Index of Imperial Russian Weights & Measures

In order to find and use specific types of Russian records, researchers need to be able to identify and understand some key terms in the Russian language. The following index contains Imperial Russian weights and measures (transliterated from Russian) and their conversion into smaller Imperial Russian units, Imperial and metric (columns left to right). The terms included here are those that you are likely to find in Russian genealogical sources. If the term you are looking for is not on this list, please consult a Russian-English dictionary. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Index — Weights – Liquid Measures – Dry Measures – Linear Measures – Monetary Terms – Other Terms

Weights

Rad

14 pud

505.58 lbs

229.33 kilograms

Berkovets

10 pud

361 lbs

163.74 kilograms

Korob

7 pud

252 lbs

114.30 kilograms

Pud

40 funt

36.11 lbs

16.38 kilograms

Funt

96 zolotnik

12.0 oz

409.5 grams

Lot

3 zolotnik

0.99 oz

12.74 grams

Zolotnik

1/96 funt

0.33 oz

4.26 grams

Dolia

1/96 zolotnik

0.0034 oz

0.044 grams

Liquid Measures

Bochka

40 vedro

121 gallons

492 liters

Chetvert

.25 bochka

32.5 gallons

123.01 liters

Vedro

3.25 gallons

12.3 liters

Butylka

1/20 vedro

0.16 gallons

0.61 liters

Dry Measures (Mostly Grains)

Chetvert

.25 rad

126.39 lbs

57.33 kilograms

Osmina

½ chetvert

63.19 lbs

28.67 kilograms

Chetverik

1/8 chetvert

15.8 lbs

7.16 kilograms

Linear Measures

Verst

500 sazhen

.663 miles

1.0668 km

Sazhen

3 arshin

7 feet

2.133 m

Arshin

16 vershok

28 inches

72.12 cm

Fut

12 diuim

1 foot

30.48 cm

Chetvert

.25 arshin

7 inches

18.03 cm

Vershok

1.75 inches

4.445 cm

Diuim

1 inch

2.54 cm

Desiatina

2400 square sazhen

2.7 acres

1.0925 ha

Chetvert

1/2 desiatina

1.35 acres

.273 ha

Monetary Terms

Chervonets

10 rubles;

(in ancient times 3 rubles)

Poltora

1 ½ ruble; 150 kopek

Ruble

100 kopek

(roughly corresponding to a dollar)

Poltina

50 kopek; ½ ruble

Chetvertak

25 kopek

Dvugrivenny

20 kopek; 2 grivennik

Pyatialtynny

15 kopek; 5 altyn

Grivna; Grivennik

10 kopek

Pyatak

5 kopek

Altyn

3 kopek; 6 den’ga

Dvushka

2 kopek; 4 den’ga

Kopek

2 den’ga

(roughly corresponding to a penny)

Den’ga

½ kopek

Notes

Specific weights and measures in Imperial Russia often changed values over time and sometimes held more than one value at the same time.  In 1918, all weights and measurements in the Soviet Union were changed to the metric system.

Other Russian Terms

Bibliography

  • Dal, V.I. Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka. (Moscow, 1999).

  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail I. Correspondence to the author re: Russian genealogical terms. September, 2006.

  • Mueller, V.K. English-Russian Dictionary. 24th Ed. (Moscow, 1995).

  • Pushkarev, Sergei G. Dictionary of Russian Historical Terms from the Eleventh Century to 1917 (Yale, 1970).

Index of Russian Date and Calendar Terms

In order to find and use specific types of Russian records, researchers need to be able to identify and understand some key terms in the Russian language. The following index contains terms relating to time, dates and calendars transliterated from Russian (left column) and their English translations (right column). The terms included here are those that you are likely to find in Russian genealogical sources. If the term you are looking for is not on this list, please consult a Russian-English dictionary. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Index — Units of Time – Time of Day – Days – Months – Seasons – Old/New Calendar – Other Terms

Units of Time

Sekunda

second

Minuta

minute

Chas

hour

Den’

day

Nedelya

week

Mesyats

month

God

year

Leto

year

Desyatok

decade

Vek

century; generation

Stoletie

century

Time of Day

Den’

day; afternoon

Noch’

night

Polden’

noon; midday

Polnoch’

midnight

Utro

morning; forenoon

Vecher

evening

Days of the Week

Ponedel’nik

Monday

Vtornik

Tuesday

Sreda

Wednesday

Chetverg

Thursday

Pyatnitsa

Friday

Subbota

Saturday

Voskresen’e

Sunday

Months of the Year

Yanvar’

January

Fevral’

February

Mart

March

Aprel’

April

Mai

May

Iyun’

June

Iyul’

July

Avgust

August

Sentyabr’

September

Oktyabr’

October

Noyabr’

November

Dekabr’

December

Seasons

Vesna

spring

Leto

summer

Osen’

autumn

Zima

winter

Old/New Calendar

Imperial Russia operated on the ‘old-style’ Julian calendar (staryi stil’), which was in common use in Europe after it was authorized by Julius Caesar in 46 B.C.  However, after 1582, most Western European countries adopted the ‘new-style’ Gregorian calendar (novyi stil’) proclaimed by Pope Gregory XIII, which abolished the leap year for centenary years not exactly divisible by 400. By the 19th century, the old-style calendar was 12 days behind the new-style calendar (13 days behind in a leap-year). In February 1918, the Soviet Union adopted the new-style calendar; however, the Russian Orthodox Church still used the old-style calendar. In the calculation of any historical dates, therefore, one must take into account whether the old-style or new-style calendar was in use.

Other Russian Terms

Bibliography

  • Dal, V.I. Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka. (Moscow, 1999).

  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail I. Correspondence to the author re: Russian genealogical terms. September, 2006.

  • Mueller, V.K. English-Russian Dictionary. 24th Ed. (Moscow, 1995).

  • Pushkarev, Sergei G. Dictionary of Russian Historical Terms from the Eleventh Century to 1917 (Yale, 1970).

Index of Russian Genealogical Terms

In order to find and use specific types of Russian records, researchers need to be able to identify and understand some key terms in the Russian language. The following index contains general genealogical terms transliterated from Russian (left column) and their English translations (right column). The terms included here are those that you are likely to find in Russian genealogical sources. If the term you are looking for is not on this list, please consult a Russian-English dictionary. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Index — A – B – Ch – D – E – F – G –I – K – L – M – N – O – P – R – S – T – U – V – Y – Z – Other Terms

Genealogical Terms

A

Adres

address

B

Bednyi

indigent; poor

Beremennaya

pregnant

Bezdetnyi

childless

Bezobraznyi

deformed

Biblioteka

library

Bibliya

Bible

Bog

God

Bolezn’

disease; sickness

Bol’noy

sick

Bol’shoy

large; great

Ch

Chast’

part; portion; share

Cherespolosnyi

property scattered among several plots of land

Cherta

line; boundary

Chislo

number; figure; quantity

Chto

what; that

D

Devich’ya Familia

maiden name

Dar

dower

Data

date

Data Rozhdeniya

date of birth

Data Smerti

date of death

Den’gi

money

Den’ Angela

name-day; festival of the anniversary of one’s saint

Den’ Rozhdeniya

birthday

Dlya

for

Dolya

part; portion; share

Dom

home; house

Domokhoziain

household head; landlord

Dovod

proof; argument; evidence

Drug

friend

Dusha

soul; person

E

Ee

her

Ego

him

Emigrant

emigrant

Etnicheskaya Prinadlezhnost’

ethnicity

Eto

it

F

Familia

surname

Fotografiya

photograph

G

Gazeta

newspaper

Gde

where

Genealogiya

genealogy

Genealogicheskoe Drevo

family tree

Geograficheskii Spravochnik

gazetteer

Geral’dika

heraldry

Gerb

coat-of-arms

Glukhoy

deaf

Gospodin

Mister; Mr.

Gospozha

Mrs.

Grazhdanin / Grazhdanka

citizen (m/f)

Grazhdanstvo

citizenship

Grob; Grobnitsa

tomb; grave; coffin

I

I

and; also

Ili

either; or

Imenie

property; holding; estate

Imeniny

name-day; one’s Saint’s day

Immigrant

immigrant

Imperskii

imperial

Imushchestvo

chattels

Imya

name

Inostranets / Inostranka

foreigner (m/f)

Ispytanie

trial; investigation; examination

Istoriya

history

Iz

from; out of

Izba

house; hut

Izgnannik / Izgnannitsa

exile (m/f)

K

Kak

how

Kalandr

calendar

Karta

map

Khleb

bred; crops; grain

Khromoy

crippled

Kladbishche

cemetery; graveyard

Kniga

book

Kogda

when

Korova

cow

Kto

who

Kyl’tura

culture

L
Laskatel’noe Imya pet name

Let

years old

Lineinyi

lineal

Loshad’

horse

Lyudi

people

M

Malen’kii

small

Materinskii

maternal

Mertvorozhdennyi

stillborn

Mestnyi

local

Mesto Rozhdeniya

place of birth

Mesto Smerti

place of death

Mesto Zhitel’stva

residence

Mir

peasant council in Imperial Russia that held assemblies, voted on matters affecting the village and organized collective undertakings

Mladshii

youngest; younger; (name) the Younger

Mogila

grave; mound

Muzei

museum

Muzhik

little man; peasant; man of a lower class

My

we

N

Na

on; upon; to

Narod

nation

Naselenie

population

Naslednik

heir

Naslednitsa

heiress

Nasledovanie

inheritance

Natsional’nost’

nationality

Nazvanie

name; appellation

Nemets / Nemka

(archaic) foreigner (m/f)

Nemoy

mute

Nenazvannyi

unnamed; nameless

Ne Sostoyashchii V Brake

unmarried; single

Nesovershennoletnii

underage

Novobrachnyi newly-wedded; newly-married

Novoobrashcheniyi

convert

Novorozhdennyi

newly-born; newborn

Novoselets / Novoselka new settler (m/f)
O

O

about; concerning

Obrok

poll tax or fixed payment paid by peasants in Imperial Russia

Obshchestvo

society; community; association

Obshchina

peasant commune or community

Obyvatel’ / Obyvatitsa

inhabitant (m/f)

Odnofamilets / Odnofamilitsa

person with same surname (m/f)

Ona

she

Ona umerla

(she) died

On

he

Oni

they

On umer

(he) died

On zhe

called; also known as

Ostavlennyi

left; left-hand

Ostrog

prison; jail

Otchestvo

patronymic (middle name)

Otecheskii

paternal

Otechestvo

homeland; native land

Otsovskii

paternal

P

Paskha

Easter

Pereselenets / Pereselenka

emigrant

Pereselenie

emigration; removal to; transmigration

Pis’mo

letter; correspondence

Plemya

family; kin; relatives; tribe

Po Angliskii

in English

Pochemu

why

Pod

under; near; to

Podat’

tax

Podlis’

signature

Pogost

churchyard; cemetery

Pokoynyi

deceased

Pomest’e

real estate; landed property

Poselenets / Poselenka

settler; colonist; deportee (m/f)

Poselyanin / Poselyanka

villager; peasant (m/f)

Potomstvo

offspring; issue

Po Russkii

in Russian

Pozhitki

property; chattels; moveable property; belongings

Pravo

right; law; code of laws

Pravyi

right; right-hand

Predostavlenie

grant; bestowal; reservation

Preklonnykh Let

of great age

Prestunnik / Prestunnitsa

convict (m/f)

Priblizitel’no

circa; approximately

Prichina Smerti

cause of death

Pridanoe

dowry

Proiskhozhdenie

lineage

Proizvodnoe Imya derivative (diminutive) name

Pros’ba

prayer

Prozvanie

nickname

Prozvishche

nickname

Psevdonim

alias

Put’

way; road; passage

R

Rabota

work; job

Rasa

race

Remeslo

handicraft; trade; profession

Religiya

religion

Rod

gender; clan

Rodina

homeland; Motherland

Rodoslovnaya

pedigree

Rodstvo

kinship

Rossia

Russia

Rozhdestvo Khristovo

Christmas

S

Segodnya

today

Semeistvo

family

Semeinoe Polozhenie

marital status

Sem’ya

family

Sever

north

Slaboumnyi

weak-minded; imbecile; crazy

Slepoy

blind

Smert’

death

Sobranie

assembly; meeting; gathering

Sobstvennost’

property; ownership

Soslovie

class; estate; rank

Sovet

advice; counsel; agreement; assembly

Ssylka

exile; deportation; banishment

Ssyl’nyi

exile; outlaw; convict

Starinnyi

ancient; old

Starobytnyi

ancient; old; old-fashioned

Starost’

old age

Starozhilets / Starozhilka

old inhabitant; long-term resident (m/f)

Starshii

oldest; older; (name) the Elder

Staryi

old; aged; elderly

Stradanie

suffering

Sud

trial court

Svakha

match-maker

Svatostvo

match-making; wooing

Sverstnik / Sverstnitsa

person of the same age or rank (m/f)

Svidetel’

witness

Svoistvo

relationship by marriage

T

Tezka

namesake

Tovar

goods; merchandise; wares

Tovarishch

comrade; companion; colleague

Traditsiya

tradition; custom

Trup

corpse

Tsar

sovereign; ruler of Imperial Russia

Tsarevich

son of the Tsar

Tsarevna

daughter of the Tsar

Tsaritsa

Tsar’s wife

Tsarstvo

Tsardom; realm

Tserkov’

church

U

Udocherenie

adoption (of a girl)

Udostoverenie

evidence; testimony

Ulitsa

street

Umen’shitel’noe Imya diminutive name

Urodlivyi

deformed

Usynovlenie

adoption (of a boy)

V

V

into; towards; on; at

Vchera

yesterday

Veche

town meeting or assembly

Vechnaya Pamyat’

eternal memory

Vera

faith; creed; religion

Vostok

east

Vozrast

age

Vremya

time

Y

Yazyk

language

Yug

south

Z

Zanyatie

occupation

Zapad

west

Zavtra

tomorrow

Zemlevladenie

land ownership in Imperial Russia

Zhenatyi

married

Zhilets / Zhilitsa

(archaic) inhabitant (m/f)

Zhizn’

life

 

Other Russian Terms

Bibliography

  • Dal, V.I. Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka. (Moscow, 1999).

  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail I. Correspondence to the author re: Russian genealogical terms. September, 2006.

  • Mueller, V.K. English-Russian Dictionary. 24th Ed. (Moscow, 1995).

  • Pushkarev, Sergei G. Dictionary of Russian Historical Terms from the Eleventh Century to 1917 (Yale, 1970).

Index of Russian Nationality, Religion & Class Terms

In order to find and use specific types of Russian records, researchers need to be able to identify and understand some key terms in the Russian language. The following index contains terms relating to nationality, religion and class in Imperial Russia transliterated from Russian (left column) and their English translations (right column). The terms included here are those that you are likely to find in Russian genealogical sources. If the term you are looking for is not on this list, please consult a Russian-English dictionary. Compiled by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Index — Nationality – Religion – Class – Other Terms

Nationality

Anglichanin / Anglichanka

English (m/f)

Armyanin / Armyanka

Armenian (m/f)

Azerbaidzhanets / Azerbaidzhanka

Azerbaijani (m/f)

Bashkir / Bashkirka

Bashkir (m/f)

Belorus / Beloruska

Belorussian (m/f)

Bolgarin / Bolgarka

Bulgarian (m/f)

Chuvash / Chuvashka

Chuvash (m/f)

Estonets / Estonka

Estonian (m/f)

Gruzin / Gruzinka

Georgian (m/f)

Grek / Grechanka

Greek (m/f)

Kazak / Kazashka

Kazakh (m/f)

Khokhol / Khokholka

(vulgar) Ukrainian (m/f)

Kirgiz / Kirgizka

Kirghiz (m/f)

Latviets / Latviika

Latvian (m/f)

Litovets / Litovka

Lithuanian (m/f)

Maloross / Malorosska

(archaic) Little Russian; Ukrainian (m/f)

Moldavanin / Moldavanka

Moldavian (m/f)

Mongol / Mongolka

Mongol (m/f)

Mordvin / Mordvinka

Mordvin (m/f)

Nemets / Nemka

German (m/f)

Polyak / Pol’ka

Pole (m/f)

Rumyn / Rumynka

Romanian (m/f)

Russkii / Russkaya

Russian (m/f)

Shved / Shvedka

Swede (m/f)

Tatarin / Tatarka

Tatar (m/f)

Tsygan / Tsyganka

Gypsy (m/f)

Turkmen / Turkmenka

Turkmen (m/f)

Turok / Turchanka

Turk (m/f)

Ukrainets / Ukrainka

Ukrainian (m/f)

Uzbek / Uzbechka

Uzbek (m/f)

Vengerets / Vengerka

Hungarian (m/f)

Religion

Baptist / Baptistka

Baptist (m/f)

Besermenin / Besermenka

Moslem (m/f)

Buddist

Buddhist (m/f)

Dukhoborets / Dukhoborka

Doukhobor (m/f)

Edinoverets / Edinoverka

Religious dissenter (m/f)

Evrei / Evreika

Jew (m/f)

Inoverets / Inoverka

dissenter; non-Christian (m/f)

Iudei / Iudeika

Judaic (m/f)

Katolik / Katolichka

Catholic (m/f)

Khlyst

Khlyst; Flagellant (m/f)

Khristianin / Khristianka

Christian (m/f)

Lyuteranin / Lyuteranka

Lutheran (m/f)

Menonit / Menonitka

Mennonite (m/f)

Molokan / Molokanka

Molokan (m/f)

Musul’manin / Musul’manka

Moslem (m/f)

Pravoslavnii / Pravoslavnaya

Russian Orthodox (m/f)

Protestant / Protestantka

Protestant (m/f)

Raskol’nik / Raskol’nitsa

Schismatic / Old Believer (m/f)

Sektant / Sektantka

Sectarian (m/f)

Shtundist / Shtundistka

Stundist (m/f)

Staroobryadets / Staroobryadka

Old Ritualist / Old Believer (m/f)

Starover / Staroverka

Old Believer (m/f)

Subbotnik / Subbotnitsa

Sabbatarian (m/f)

Uniat / Uniatka

Uniate (m/f)

Zhid / Zhidovka

(vulgar) Jew (m/f)

Class

Dvoryanin / Dvoryanka

member of the nobility (dvoryanstvo) in Imperial Russia (m/f); persons of this class were entitled, through inheritance or earned through state service noble status, either inherited or earned through state service, entitled the holder to own land and serfs, enter civil service, freedom from military service and other privileges

Svyashchennik

member of the clergy (dukhovenstvo) in Imperial Russia

Kupets / Kupchikha

member of the merchant class (kupechestvo) in Imperial Russia (m/f); persons of this class were divided into three guilds by wealth and status

Meshchanin / Meshchanka

member of the citizen class (meshchane) in Imperial Russia (m/f); urban dweller of lower social status; petty bourgeois townsman

Krest’yanin / Krest’yanka

member of the peasant class (krest’yane) in Imperial Russia (m/f); persons of this class possessed their own household and held a small plot of land (owned by themselves or others) with appurtenances and owed an obligation to perform military service and pay taxes; persons of this class were divided into numerous sub-classes of free and bonded peasants

Odnodvorets / Odnodvorka

one-homesteader (m/f); persons of the one-homesteader (odnodvortsy) class descended from military servitors settled on the southern and eastern frontiers of the Empire and had the right to own their own lands and serfs and the obligation to perform military service and pay taxes; this class, which stood between the nobility and peasantry, eventually was transferred to the state peasant class

Kazak / Kazachka

Cossack (m/f); the Cossack class (kazaki) were an elite military force in Imperial Russia made up of free-spirited adventurers, employed by the Tsars as an auxiliary to its regular troops in the more remote southern areas of the Empire; a person of this category owed an obligation to perform military service but not to pay taxes

Inorodets / Inorodka

native tribesman (m/f); members of native tribes and ethnic groups (inorodtsy) in Siberia and the Far East held special legal status and privileges

Other Russian Terms

Bibliography

  • Dal, V.I. Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka. (Moscow, 1999).

  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail I. Correspondence to the author re: Russian genealogical terms. September, 2006.

  • Mueller, V.K. English-Russian Dictionary. 24th Ed. (Moscow, 1995).

  • Pushkarev, Sergei G. Dictionary of Russian Historical Terms from the Eleventh Century to 1917 (Yale, 1970).

Origin and Meaning of Doukhobor Surnames

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

A study of the origin and meaning of Doukhobor surnames reveals many clues about our family history. In some cases they indicate the first name, trade or occupation, descriptive nickname, or ethnic or geographic origin of an early ancestor. Some family names are very common and widely distributed in Russia, whereas others have uniquely Doukhobor origins. The form and spelling of many Doukhobor surnames have changed significantly over the past three centuries. This glossary contains roots and meanings of 714 Russian surnames occurring among the Doukhobors, together with the original Cyrillic spelling, transliterated English spelling, and over 2,600 English spelling variations. Note: to search for a particular surname, use the alphabetical index below or else use your browser’s <find> function by pressing <Control F> and typing in the name.

Index – AB – ChD –   E –   F –   G/H –   I –   K –   L –   M –   N –   O –   P –   R –   S –   T –   U –   V –   Y –   Z

 

A –

Ababkov
nicknameАбабков. This surname originates from ababok, the dialect term for a type of mushroom. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Ababkovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code A112]

Abakumov
firstnameАбакумов. This patronymic surname is derived from Abakum, a diminutive form of the men’s name Avakum. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A125]

Abrosimov
firstnameАбросимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Abrosim, a diminutive form of the men’s name Amvrosy. The Abrosimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abrosimoff, Abrossimoff, Obrosimoff, Abrosimow, Abrosimove, Abrosimo.  [Soundex Code A162]

Afanas’ev
firstnameАфанасьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Afanasy. The Afanas’evs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code A152]

Agafonov
firstnameАгафонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Agafon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A215]

Ageev
firstnameАгеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Aggei. The Ageevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A210]

Akimov
firstnameАкимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Akim. The Akimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A251]

Aleksandrov
firstnameАлексадров. This surname is derived from the men’s name Aleksander, or less commonly, from the women’s name Aleksandra.  Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Pozdnyakov family in Canada in the early 20th century, whose matriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alexandroff.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alekseev
firstnameАлексеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Aleksei. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A421] 

Alekseishin
firstnameАлексейшин. Alekseishin is derived from Alekseisha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aleksei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Fofanov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code A422]

Amosov
firstnameАмосов. Amosov is derived from the men’s name Amos. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Samoylov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name, most likely as a nickname. [Soundex Code A520]

Andreev
firstnameАндреев. Andreev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Andrei. The Andreevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A536]

Androsov
firstnameАндросов. This patronymic surname is derived from Andros, a diminutive form of the men’s name Andron. The Androsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Androsoff, Andrasoff, Androsow, Andersov, Androsove.  [Soundex Code A536]

Anikushin
firstnameАникушин. Anikushin is derived from Anikusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Anikei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A522]

Anisin
firstnameАнисин. Anisin is derived from the men’s name Anisii or the women’s name Anisia. Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A525]

Antyufeev
firstnameАнтюфеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Antyufei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Antifii. The Antyufeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Antufaeff, Antifave, Antifayeff, Antifaeff, Antifaev, Antifaoff, Antifeau, Antiufeeff, Antifeoff, Antifeiff, Antifeyew, Antyufeev, Antyufeyev, Antiufeyev, Antifeev, Antifeyev, Antufeev, Antufeyev, Antufeyff, Antoofeiff, Antufeaff, Antufaiff, Antufeiff, Antifeiv, Antifay.  [Soundex Code A531]

Anyutushkin
firstnameАнютушкин. This matronymic surname is derived from Anyutushka, a diminutive form of the women’s name Anna. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Peter “Lordly” Verigin to the offspring of his sister Anyutushka, some of whom bore the Semenov family name and some of whom bore the Podovinnikov family name. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Anootushkin, Anutushkin, Anutooshkin, Anootooshkin, Anootoshkin, Anatyshkin, Anatooskin, Anatooshkin, Anutushken.  [Soundex Code A532]

Arekhov
firstnameАрехов. Arekhov is derived from Arekha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Arefei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Verigin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Arekhoff, Arekoff, Orekoff. [Soundex Code A621]

Areshin
firstnameАрешин. Areshin is derived from Aresha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Arefei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Verigin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code A625]

Argatov
occupationalАргатов. This surname originates from argat, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning “labourer”, especially an agricultural, seasonal or itinerant labourer. The Argatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Argatoff, Argotoff, Arhatoff, Argatow, Arhatow, Arhatov, Argatove.  [Soundex Code A623]

Arishchenkov
firstnameАрищенков (Арищенко). Among the Doukhobors, Arishchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Arishchenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from Arishka, a diminutive form of the women’s name Arina or the men’s name Arinei. The Arishchenkovs (Arishchenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Arishenkoff, Areshenkoff, Arishenkow, Areshenkow, Arishenko, Arishenkov, Arischenko, Arischenkov, Arishchenko, Arischenkoff, Arishenkove.  [Soundex Code A625]

Arkhipov
firstnameАрхипов. Arkhipov is derived from the men’s name Arkhip. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Savenkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code A621]

Artemev
firstnameАртемев. This surname is derived from the men’s name Artemei. There were two unrelated branches of Artemevs among the Doukhobors; one that originated from the Don in the 18th century; and another that resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A635]

Aseev
firstnameАсеев. Aseev is derived from Asei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Evsevei. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. [Soundex Code A210]

Astafurov
firstnameАстафуров. This surname is derived from Astafura, a diminutive form of the men’s name Astafei. The Astafurovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stafurov, Astafooroff, Ostoforoff, Astoforoff, Astofooroff, Astaforoff, Ostaforoff, Ostofuroff, Ostafooroff, Ostofooroff, Astafurow, Ostaforow, Ostofaroff.  [Soundex Code A231; O231]

Atamanenko
occupationalАтаманенко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term ataman, meaning “leader” or “chief” of a Cossack settlement. At war the ataman was a military officer with unlimited power; in peace, an administrator who carried out decisions of the local Cossack assembly and kept order in the community. An Atamanenko family, originally of non-Doukhobor Ukrainian ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century.  [Soundex Code A355]

Atamanov
occupationalАтаманов. Atamanov is derived from the term ataman, meaning “leader” or “chief” of a Cossack settlement. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Golubov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the late 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name as a title or nickname. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members in Russia.  [Soundex Code A355]

Azarov
firstnameАзаров. This surname is derived from Azar, a diminutive form of the men’s name Azarii.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term azar, meaning “to help”.  The Azarovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A261]

– B –

Babaev
nicknameБабаев. This surname is of nickname origin and derives from the Tatar term babai, meaning “grandfather”. This should not be confused with the more familiar Russian term baba, meaning “grandmother” or “old woman”. The Babaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Babayeff, Babaeff, Babaew, Babayev.  [Soundex Code B110]

Babanin
nicknameБабанин. This surname originates from babanya, a diminutive form of the term baba, meaning “grandmother”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Babakaev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code B155]

Babakaev
nicknameБабакаев. This surname originates from the Tatar term babakai, meaning “grandfather”.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Russian dialect term babakoi, meaning “grandmother”.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Babakaeff, Babakieff, Babakaiff, Babakioff, Babakaew, Babakayew, Babakayev, Babakave.  [Soundex Code B121]

Babiychuk
nicknameБабийчук . This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term babiy, meaning “womanizer”. This nickname has a rather indecent or obscene connotation and may have been given to a lover, philanderer or lecher. The Babiychuks among the Doukhobors originated from Kiev province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B122]

Baev
nicknameБаев. This surname originates from the dialect verb bait’ meaning “to speak” or “to tell”. Bai was the term given to a “chatterer” or “storey-teller”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term bai, meaning “lord” or “noble”. The Baevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Bayoff, Baioff. Baeff, Baiff, Bayev.  [Soundex Code B100]

Balabanov
nicknameБалабанов. This surname originates from balaban, a term borrowed from the Turkic language for a species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Note that this term also referred to a silly, crude or talkative person.  The Balabanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B415]

Balychev
nicknameБалычев. This surname originates from the term balyk, a type of salted, dried sturgeon fillet popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Balychevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B421]

Barabanov
nicknameБарабанов. This surname originates from the term baraban, meaning “drum”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the drum, a drum-maker or perhaps a loud, boisterous individual. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Barbin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barabanoff, Barbonoff, Barabonow, Barabanow, Borobanoff, Barabonoff, Barabanove, Barbano.  [Soundex Code B615]

Baranov
nicknameБаранов. This surname originates from the term baran, meaning “ram”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ram, perhaps a gentle, affectionate personality. The Baranovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kamchatka region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B651]

Barbin
nicknameБарбин. This surname originates from the dialect verb barabat’ meaning “to dig”, “to rummage”, to “grasp” or “to appropriate”.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term barba, meaning “broad and thick of beard”.  The Barbins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Barabanov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B615]

Barchukov
nicknameБарчуков. This surname originates from the term barchuk, meaning a young barin (nobleman). Note that this term also referred to a lazy or idle individual. The Barchukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B622]

Barovsky
locationalБаровский (Оборовский). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Oborovsky. The “O” was droppedin the second half of the 19th century. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Obor, Obara or Obarov, so called from the Ukrainian term obora, meaning “cattle enclosure” or “stable”. The Barovskys (Oborovskys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Oborovsky, Oborovskii, Abarovsky, Abarovskii, Barosky, Baroski, Barousky, Barofsky, Barovski, Borovskii, Barowski, Barowsky, Barovskie, Borovskiy, Borovskij, Barovskii, Barovskiy, Barovskij, Barowskoff, Boroskoff.  [Soundex Code B612]

Baturin
locationalБатурин (Батуриненко). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Baturinenko. The -enko suffix ending was dropped in the second half of the 19th century. It indicates an ancestor who originated from the Ukrainian town of Baturin, so called from the Turkic term batur, meaning “great hero”. The Baturins (Baturinenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Baturen, Batoorin, Baturinskii, Baturinskij, Baturinskiy, Baturinski. [Soundex Code B365]

Baturinsky
locationalБатуринский. This name is properly Baturinenko (Baturin). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Baturinenko (Baturin) family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code B365]

Baulin
nicknameБаулин. This surname originates from the term baul (pronounced bawool) meaning “chest” or “trunk”. Note that this term also referred to a “stutterer” or “stammerer”. The Baulins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bawoolin, Bawolin, Baulen, Bowulin, Bowlin, Boulin, Bowolin.  [Soundex Code B450]

Bazilevsky
firstnameБазилевский. This surname is derived from Bazil, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vasily. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy. The Bazilevskys among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B241]

Bedinov
nicknameБединов (Бедин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Bedin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term beda, meaning “woe” or “misfortune”. The Bedinovs (Bedins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bidinoff, Bidenoff, Bidinow, Bedenow, Bedinoff, Bedinove.  [Soundex Code B351]

Beloivanov
nicknameБелоиванов. This surname originates from the term belyi (“white”) + the men’s name Ivan. It refers to “Ivan with the white hair or fair complexion”. Note that Ivan was a very popular and widespread name in Old Russia and frequently all the sons in a family received this name. To distinguish one Ivan from the others, they might be nicknamed White Ivan, Black Ivan, Big Ivan, Little Ivan, Middle Ivan, etc. The Beloivanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belavanoff, Belovanoff, Beloivanoff.  [Soundex Code B415]

Beloperstov
nicknameБелоперстов. This surname originates from the term belyi (“white”) + perst (“finger”) or “white-finger”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B416]

Belousov
nicknameБелоусов. This surname originates from the term belyi (“white”) + us (“moustache”) or “white-moustache”. The resulting nickname belous (pronounced belowoos) was given to someone with a white, light or greyish moustache. The Belousovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B421]

Belovodov
locationalБеловодов. This surname originates from the dialect term belovod’e, meaning “free” or “unpopulated” land, and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. The Belovodovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B413]

Bezborodin
nicknameБезбородин. This surname originates from the term bez (“without”) + boroda (“beard”) and means “one without a beard” or “beardless”.  Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gubanov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code B216]

Bezlepkin
nicknameБезлепкин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term bezlepka, meaning “without beauty” or “ugly”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a homely, plain individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B241]

Bezperstov
nicknameБезперстов. This surname originates from the term bez (“without”) + perst (“finger”) or “missing-finger”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone missing a finger as a result of some mishap. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B216]

Biryukov
nicknameБирюков. This surname originates from biryuk, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning “wolf”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. The Biryukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Berekoff, Berikoff, Berukoff, Birukoff, Barikoff, Birokoff, Burikoff, Berekow, Berikow, Berukow, Birookoff, Birukow, Biryoukoff, Bierukoff, Birekoff, Biriukov, Biriukove, Berukove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Blokhin
nicknameБлохин. This surname originates from the term blokha, meaning “flea”. The Blokhins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B425]

Bludov
nicknameБлудов. This surname originates from the verb bludit’ meaning “to play pranks”, “to lead a dissolute life” or “to be lewd”. This nickname has a rather indecent or obscene connotation and may have been given to a lover, philanderer or lecher. The Bludovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bludow, Bloudoff, Bludoff, Bloodoff, Bloodow, Bludove.  [Soundex Code B431]

Bogatyrev
occupationalБогатырев. This surname originates from the term bogatyr’ meaning “warrior” or “great hero”. The Bogatyrevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B236]

Bokov
nicknameБоков. This surname originates from the term bok, meaning the “side” or “flank” of one’s body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. The Bokovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B210]

Bokovoy
nicknameБоковой. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term bok, meaning the “side” or “flank” of one’s body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. The Bokovoys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bokovoi, Bokovoj, Bokoff, Bokov.  [Soundex Code B210]

Bondarev
occupationalБондарев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term bondar, meaning “cooper”, a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for cooper – bochkar) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. The Bondarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bondareff, Bonderoff, Bondoreff, Bondaroff, Bondarow, Bondariff, Bonderove, Bonderow.  [Soundex Code B536]

Borisenkov
firstnameБорисенков (Борисенко). Among the Doukhobors, Borisenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Borisenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Boris. The Borisenkovs (Borisenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisenkoff, Borisinkoff, Borisenkoff, Borisenko, Barisenkov, Borisenkow, Barisenkow, Barisenko, Baresinkoff, Barisinkoff, Barisenkove, Borisenkove.  [Soundex Code B625]

Borisov
firstnameБорисов. Borisov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisoff, Barieso, Bariesoff, Berisoff, Borisoff, Barisow, Bariso, Borisow, Borisove, Barisove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Borovkov
nicknameБоровков. This surname originates from borovko, a diminutive form of the term borov (“boar”) meaning “little boar”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term bor, meaning “forest”. The Borovkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B612]

Bortsov
nicknameБорцов. This surname originates from the term borets, meaning “wrestler”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Borits, a diminutive form of the men’s name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bartsoff, Bortsoff, Bartsow, Bartzoff, Bartsove, Bortsove.  [Soundex Code B632]

Bosov
nicknameБосов. This surname originates from the term bosoi, meaning “barefooted” or “barelegged”. According to tradition, Ivan Bosov was an early leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B210]

Botkin
nicknameБоткин. This surname originates from the term botka, a tall pole used by fishermen in Old Russia to strike upon the water surface and stun fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool, or perhaps to a tall, lean person. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B325]

Boyarintsev
nicknameБояринцев. This surname originates from boyarinets, a possessive form of boyarin (“noble”), meaning someone belonging to a nobleman. The Boyarintsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B653]

Bozhiy
nicknameБожий. This surname originates from the term bozhii, meaning “God’s” or “divine”. According to tradition, this name was given by Doukhobor leader Peter “Lordly” Verigin (1859-1924) to a member of the Medvedev family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bojey, Bojay, Bozjhey, Bozhei, Bozhey. [Soundex Code B200]

Bryunin
nicknameБрюнин. Bryunin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the Byelorussian term biryuna, meaning “brother”. The Bryunins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B655]

Brusnitsov
nicknameБрусницов. This surname originates from the term brusnika, meaning “whortleberry”. The Brusnitsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B625]

Bubnov
nicknameБубнов. This surname originates from the term buben, meaning “tambourine”. Note that this term also referred to an “impoverished”, “idle” or “wasted” individual. The Bubnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B151]

Budaev
occupationalБудаев. This surname derives from the term buda, a mill or factory for the manufacture of potash, tar and saltpeter. Budai was the name given to a labourer at such a plant. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B310]

Bulanov
nicknameБуланов.  This surname originates from bulanii, a term borrowed from the Turkic language describing the “dun” or “tan” coloring of a horse. By analogy this term may have been given as a nickname to a brown-haired person. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Bulin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bullanoff, Boulanoff, Boulonoff, Boolinoff, Boolanoff, Bulanoff, Boulinoff, Bolinoff, Bulanow, Boulanow, Bulnoff, Boolinow, Bollinoff, Bulanove, Bulnov.  [Soundex Code B451]

Bulgakov
nicknameБулгаков. This surname originates from the Turkic term bulgak, meaning “troublesome”. The Bulgakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B422]

Bulin
nicknameБулин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term bulya, meaning “lump”, “swelling” or “bulb”. Note that this term may also be a diminutive form of tsybulya (“onion”) or bulka (“bread roll”). The Bulins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Bulanov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B450]

Bul’kov
nicknameБульков. Bul’kov is derived from the dialect term bul’k, the perceived sound (in Russian) of water gurgling or bubbling. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bulanov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the early 20th century. [Soundex Code B421]

Burlakov
occupationalБурлаков. This surname originates from the term burlak, meaning “barge-hauler”. The burlaki were workers in Old Russia’s dangerous river shipping industry, often serving as human draught animals to pull barges and boats upstream against the current. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B642]

Burlin
nicknameБурлин. This surname originates from the dialect term burla, meaning “storm”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was stormy or unstable, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon.  The Burlins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B645]

Burnashev
nicknameБурнашев. This surname originates from the dialect verb burnashit’ meaning “to rage”, “to brawl” or “to quarrel”.  Burnash was the name given to someone who often squabbled, quarreled or brawled. The Burnashevs among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B652]

Bushkov
nicknameБушков. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term bushui, meaning “storm”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a brawling or naughty child, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Bushkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B221]

Butuzin
nicknameБутузин. This surname is derived from the term butuz, meaning “chubby child” or “kiddy”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description, or as a term of endearment to a child or loved one. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Markin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code B325]

Buyanov
firstnameБуянов. This surname is derived from the term buyan, meaning “brawler”, “bully”, “fighter”, “daring” and “exuberant”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. The Buyanovs among the Doukhobors originated from Saratov province, Russia in the 18th century, resided in the Tomsk region of Russia in the early to mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B510]

Bychkov
nicknameБычков. This surname originates from the term bychok, meaning a “young ox” or “bullock”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bychkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kostroma, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B221]

Bykanov
nicknameБыканов. This surname originates from bykan, a diminutive form of the term byk (“bull”) meaning “little bull”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bykanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bakanoff, Bukanoff, Bikanoff, Bikanov, Bikanove, Bykanove.  [Soundex Code B251]

Bykov
nicknameБыков. This surname originates from the term byk meaning “bull”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Bykovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B210]

Bykovsky
locationalБыковский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Byk, Bykovo or Bykovskiy, so called from the term byk meaning “bull”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B212]

Butsky
locationalБуцкий. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named ButkaButki or Butskoy, so called from the term butka, meaning “structure”, “building” or “shelter”. The Butskys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B320]

– Ch –

Chekmarev
nicknameЧекмарев. This surname originates from chekmar, a term borrowed from the Turkic language meaning “wooden hammer”, “bat”, “beetle” or “club”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool or perhaps a persistent and persevering individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chikmaroff, Chikmoroff, Chigmaroff, Chikmarow, Chickmaroff, Chigmarow, Chigmoroff, Chekmarov, Chekmaryov, Chekmariov, Czekmarow, Czekmarev, Chekmarove.  [Soundex Code C256]

Chentsov
occupationalЧенцов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term chenets, meaning “monk”, a man who is a member of a Russian Orthodox religious order and lives in a monastery. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C532]

Cheparov
occupationalЧепаров. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term chepar, meaning “messenger” or “courier”.  It is also suggested that it may derive from the Tatar term chapar, meaning “soldier” or “guard”,  the dialect term chipar, meaning “plane” tree or the dialect term chipor, meaning “sleet”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code C161]

Cherkashev
locationalЧеркашов (Черкашин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Cherkashin. The -ev suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from cherkashenin, the Old Russian term for an inhabitant of the Ukrainian town of Cherkasy. The Cherkashevs (Cherkashins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cherkashin, Cherkasoff, Cherkaseff, Cherkashoff, Cherkasow, Cherkashov, Cherkashyov, Cherkashiov, Cherkassoff. [Soundex Code C622]

Chernenkov
nicknameЧерненков (Черненко). Among the Doukhobors, Chernenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Chernenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. It originates from the term chernoi, meaning “black”. This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. The Chernenkovs (Chernenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the thirteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernenkoff, Chernenkow, Chernenko, Cherenkoff, Tchernenkoff, Chernencoff, Chernencove, Chernenkove, Chernenkof, Czernenkow, Czernenkov, Chernen.  [Soundex Code C655]

Chernov
nicknameЧернов (Черной). This surname originates from the term chernoi, meaning “black”. This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. There were two unrelated branches of Chernovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. The original surname of the latter branch was Chernoy, a Ukrainian surnamed Russianized by adding an -ov suffix ending in the first half of the 19th century. In 1970 it was found to be the second most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernoy, Chernoi, Chernof, Chernoff, Chernow, Chernove, Cernoff, Tchernoff, Czernov, Czernow, Chirnow.  [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyshov
nicknameЧернышов. This surname originates from chernysh, a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning “black”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C652]

Chireikov
nicknameЧирейков. This surname originates from the dialect term chirei, meaning “boil”, “furuncle” or “abscess”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with this skin condition. The Chireikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C621]

Chistyakov
nicknameЧистяков. Chistyakov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term chistyak, meaning “cleanser”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as a title or nickname for Peter Petrovich Verigin (1881-1939), leader of the Middle Party of Doukhobors in Russia from 1906-1927 and the Community Doukhobors in Canada from 1927-1939.  [Soundex Code C232]

Chivil’deev
nicknameЧивильдеев (Чувильдеев). This surname was originally written as Chuvil’deev.  It may derive from the Russian dialect term chuvil’ meaning “birdie”, from the Tatar term chuval’ meaning “hearth” or “fireplace” or from the Tatar term chuvil,a type of woven sack used to store or transport goods. In any case, it does not derive from the more familiar Russian term chivil, meaning “sparrow”, as its current spelling might suggest. The Chivil’deevs (Chuvil’deevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the sixteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chevelday, Childeff, Cheveldov, Cheveldave, Cheveldae, Chivildeff, Chiveldeff, Chivildeyev, Chevaldaew, Chivildeev, Chivildeyev, Cheveldeaw, Cheveldeff, Cheveldeoff, Cheveldieff, Chivildave, Cheveldaoff, Cheveldaev, Cheveldeyeff, Cheveldayeff, Chevildeau, Chiveldave, Cheveldayoff, Cheveldeaoff, Chevaldaeff, Chiveldaeff, Cheveldeiff, Cheveldaeff, Chuvildeev, Tchevildeev, Ciwildieff, Chiwildiaff, Chevildeyev, Chiwildieff, Cheweldeiff, Chivildeeff, Chevaldeyeff, Czevildeev.  [Soundex Code C143]

Chizhev
nicknameЧижев. Chizhev originates from the term chizh, meaning “siskin” or “green finch”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chuchmaev
nicknameЧучмаев (Чучмай). Among the Doukhobors, Chuchmaev is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Chuchmai. The -ev suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the Tatar term chochamiy, meaning “lark”. The Chuchmaevs (Chuchmais) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C251]

Chulkov
nicknameЧулков. Chulkov originates from the term chulok, meaning “stocking” or “sock”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kazakov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code C421]

Chursinov
firstnameЧурсинов (Чурсин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Chursin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Chursa, a diminutive form of the men’s name Chur. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chursinoff, Chursonoff, Chursanoff, Chursinow, Chursenoff, Chursinuff, Chersinoff, Churseneff, Chursinove, Czursinov.  [Soundex Code C625]

Chutsenko
locationalЧуценко. This name is properly Chutsky. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutsky family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code C321]

Chutskov
locationalЧуцков (Чуцкий). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Chutsky. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named ChutChuts or Chutski, so called from the term chutkiy, meaning “quick of ear” or “sharp of hearing”. The Chutskovs (Chutskys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chutskoff, Chutskow, Chutskove, Chuzkoff, Chuckoff, Chutskoer, Chudskov, Chutsenko, Chutsenkov, Czucsky, Chutsky, Chutski, Chutskii, Chutskiy, Chutskij, Chutskoy, Chutskoi.  [Soundex Code C321]

D –

Danilov
firstnameДанилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Danill. The Danilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D541]

Danshin
firstnameДаншин. This patronymic surname is derived from Dansha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Danill. The Danshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Danshen, Danschen.  [Soundex Code D525]

Dar’in
firstnameДарьин. Darin is derived from the men’s name Darii or the women’s name Daria. Among the Doukhobors, it is derived from the latter and originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Daren, Dargin.  [Soundex Code D650; D625]

Davydov
firstnameДавыдов. Davydov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name David. The Davydovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tver, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Davidoff, Dovedoff, Davidow, Davidove, Daveidoff, Dawedow, Dowedoff.  [Soundex Code D131]

Dement’ev
firstnameДементьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Dementii. The Dementevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D551]

Deminov
firstnameДеминов (Демин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Demin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Deoma, a diminutive form of the men’s names Demian and Dementii. The Deminovs (Demins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demenoff, Deminoff, Demenow, Deminove.  [Soundex Code D551]

Denikarev
firstnameДеникарев. Denikarev is derived from Denika, a diminutive form of the men’s name Denis. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kireev family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. [Soundex Code D526]

Denisov
firstnameДенисов. Denisov is derived from the men’s name Denis. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Denisoff, Dennisoff, Denisow, Dennisow, Denisove.  [Soundex Code D521]

Dergausov
nicknameДергаусов. Dergausov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the verb dergat’ (“to tug or pull”) + us (“moustache”). The resulting nickname dergaus (pronounced dergawoos) may have been given to someone who habitually pulled, tugged or preened his moustache. The Dergausovs among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dergousoff, Derhousoff, Dergowusoff, Derhusoff, Derhousow, Dergausoff, Dergousow, Dergosoff, Derhausov, Dergausove, Derhausoff, Dergousove, Derhouson. [Soundex Code D622; D621]

Dirin
nicknameДирин. This surname originates from the term dira, meaning “hole”. The Dirins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code D650]

Dmitriev
firstnameДмитриев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Dmitry. The Dmitrievs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D536]

Dobrov
nicknameДобров. Dobrov is derived from the term dobroi, meaning “good” or “kind”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code D161]

Dodonov
firstnameДодонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Dodon. The Dodonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D351]

Dorodlev
nicknameДородлев. This surname originates from the term dorodnyi, meaning “portly” or “stout”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D634]

Dorofeev
firstnameДорофеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Dorofei. The Dorofeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dorofaeff, Dorofeef, Dorafeyeff, Dorofeeff, Darafayeff, Dorofeeoff, Dorafeeff, Dorrofu, Dorofeyew, Darafeiff, Drofeiff, Dorofeyev, Dorofave, Dorofay.  [Soundex Code D611]

Drobyshev
nicknameДробышев. This surname originates from the dialect term drobysh, meaning someone who takes small, fractional steps. The Drobyshevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D612]

Drozdov
nicknameДроздов. This surname originates from the term drozd, meaning “blackbird” or “thrush”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a blackbird, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. The Drozdovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drozdoff, Drazdoff, Drozdow, Drazdow, Drozdove, Drazdove.  [Soundex Code D623]

Dubasov
nicknameДубасов. This surname originates from the verb dubasit’ meaning “to cudgel” or “to give a sound thrashing to”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was a fighter or squabbler. The Dubasovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dubasoff, Doubosoff, Dubasow, Doubosiff, Dubosoff, Dubasove.  [Soundex Code D121]

Dubinin
nicknameДубинин. This surname originates from the term dubina, meaning a “cudgel” or “bludgeon”. Note that this term also referred to a “hard”, “forceful”, “obstinate” or  “foolhardy” individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dubenin, Doubinin, Doobenen, Doobinin, Doobenin, Dubinoff.  [Soundex Code D155]

Dukhoborov
nicknameДухоборов. This uniquely Doukhobor surname originates from the name of the sect, from dukho (“spirit”) + borets (“wrestler”). It may have been adopted by a member of the Doukhobor sect or given as a nickname to a non-Doukhobor Russian who originated from an area dominated by the sect. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D216]

Dulov
nicknameДулов. This surname derives from the term dulo, meaning “barrel”, “muzzle” or “bore”. The Dulovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D410]

Dunaev
locationalДунаев. This surname indicates a family that originated from the river Dunai (Danube). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D510]

Dutov
nicknameДутов. This surname originates from the term dutii, meaning “haughty”, “inflated” or “boastful”. The Dutovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dutoff, Dootoff, Doutoff, Dotoff, Dutow, Dutove.  [Soundex Code D310]

Dvortsov
locationalДворцов. This locative name derives from dvorets, meaning “palace”. It may refer to an inhabitant of a palace or any one of several settlements named Dvorets in Old Russia, or any inhabitant of a dvor (household). A Dvortsov family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Yakutsk, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Ryl’kov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dvortsoff, Dvortsow, Dwortsoff.  [Soundex Code D163]

D’yachenko
occupationalДьяченко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term d’yak, meaning “clerk” or “scribe”, a literate individual employed to write or copy documents, letters and manuscripts. The Dyachenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D252]

D’yachkov
occupationalДьячков. This surname originates from the term dyachok, meaning “church reader”. The dyachok was an ecclesiastical official assigned to read, chant and give responses during Russian Orthodox church services. Note that this term also referred to a “clerk” or “scribe”. The Dyachkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Diatchkoff, Datchkoff, Ditchkoff, Diachkoff, Diachkow, Dyatchkoff, Dechkoff, Diachkove, Diachkov, Dyachkove, D’iachkov, D’yachkov.  [Soundex Code D221]

D’yakov
occupationalДьяков. This surname originates from the term d’yak, meaning “clerk” or “scribe”, a literate individual employed to write or copy documents, letters and manuscripts. The Dyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Diakoff, Deacove, Diekoff, Deakove, Diakove, Deakoff, Deikoff, Diakow, Diakov, D’iakov, D’yakov.  [Soundex Code D210]

Dyatlov
nicknameДятлов. This surname derives from the term dyatel, meaning “woodpecker”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a woodpecker, perhaps a loud or persistent individual. The Dyatlovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D341]

Dymovsky
locationalДымовский (Дымовсков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named DymovDymovka or Dymovsk, so called from the term dym, meaning “smoke” as well as “log hut” and “courtyard”. The Dymovskys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. It was later modified to Dymovskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demosky, Dimosky, Demofsky, Demovsky, Demovski, Demovskii, Demovskij, Demovskiy, Dimovski, Dimovskii, Dimovskij, Dimovskiy, Dimowsky, Domofsky, Dimofsky, Dimofski, Dimofskie, Dimowskie, Demoskoff, Demofskoff, Demovskoff, Dimovskoff.  [Soundex Code D512]

– E –

Efanov
firstnameЕфанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Efan (pronounced Yefan), a diminutive form of the men’s name Epifan (pronounced Yepifan). There were two unrelated branches of Efanovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Efanoff, Effonoff, Efonoff, Efanow, Efonow, Yofonoff, Yefanov, Yefanoff, Efanove, Yefanove.  [Soundex Code E151]

Efimov
firstnameЕфимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Efim (pronounced Yefim). There were two unrelated branches of Efimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E151]

Efremov
firstnameЕфремов. Efremov is derived from the men’s name Efrem (pronounced Yefrem). The original Efremovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Note that Efremov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kireev family in Elizavetpol province, Russia, as well as a branch of the Evdokimov family in Tiflis province, Russia, in the mid-19th century, whose patriarchs bore this name.  [Soundex Code E165]

Egorov
firstnameЕгоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Egor (pronounced Yegor). The Egorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Egoroff, Egorow, Egroff, Egeroff, Yegorov, Yegoroff, Ehoroff, Yehoroff.  [Soundex Code E261]

Emel’yanov
firstnameЕмельянов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Emelyan. The Emelyanovs among the Doukhobors originated from Ekaterinoslav province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E545]

Eletsky
locationalЕлецкий (Елецков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the Russian city of Elets (pronounced Yelets), so called from the term el’ meaning “fir tree”. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Eletskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Eletsky, Eletski, Eletskii, Eletskiy, Eletskij, Yeletsky, Yeletski, Yeletskii, Yeletskiy, Yeletskij, Yeletskov, Eletskov, Eletskow, Eletskoff, Elitzkoff, Eleskoff, Eletscoff.  [Soundex Code E432]

Erin
firstnameЕрин. This patronymic surname is derived from Era, a diminutive form of the men’s names Ermil, Ermolei and Erofei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term era, meaning a “cheat” or “mischievous person’. The Erins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E650]

Ershkov
nicknameЕршков. This surname originates from the term ersh, meaning “ruff” fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ruff. The Ershkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E622]

Esaulov
occupationalЕсаулов. This surname is derived from esaul (pronounced yesawool), the term for a Cossack “captain”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Esauloff, Evsouloff, Esovoloff, Esawoloff, Esaooloff, Isavooloff, Yesawuloff, Esovooloff, Esouloff, Esowoloff, Esooloff, Esaulow, Yesaulov, Yesauloff, Esaulove.  [Soundex Code E241; E214]

Esipov
firstnameЕсипов. This patronymic surname is derived from Esip (pronounced Yesip), a diminutive form of  the men’s name Osip. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E211]

Evdokimov
firstnameЕвдокимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Evdokim (pronounced Yevdokim). There were two unrelated branches of Evdokimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Voronezh and the Don in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Evdokimoff, Evdakimoff, Kimoff, Evdokimow, Evdokimiff, Evdekimoff, Yevdokimov, Yevdokimoff, Evdokimove.  [Soundex Code E132]

Evseev
firstnameЕвсеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Evsei (pronounced Yevsei).  The Evseevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E121]

Evsyukov
firstnameЕвсюков. This patronymic surname is derived from Evsyuk (pronounced Yevsyuk), a diminutive form of the men’s name Evsevei (pronounced Yevsevei). The Evsyukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E122]

– F –

Fedin
firstnameФедин. Fedin is derived from Fedya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Fyodor. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kazakov family, whose patriarch bore this name, in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code F350]

Fedorov
firstnameФедоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Fyodor. The Fedorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F361]

Fedosov
firstnameФедосов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Fedosei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fedosoff, Fedosow, Fedosove.  [Soundex Code F321]

Fedotov
firstnameФедотов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Fedot. The Fedotovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F331]

Fetisov
firstnameФетисов. This patronymic surname is derived from Fetis, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Feoktist. The Fetisovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F321]

Filip’ev
firstnameФилипьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Filipii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Filipp.  The Filip’evs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F411]

Filippov
firstnameФилиппов. Filippov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Filipp. The Filippovs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filipoff, Fillipoff, Phillipoff, Philipoff, Filapoff, Filipow, Filipove, Philipove, Phillips.  [Soundex Code F411]

Finashin
firstnameФинашин. Finashin is derived from Finasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Finogen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code F525]

Finasov
firstnameФинасов. Finasov is derived from Finas, a diminutive form of the men’s name Finogen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code F521]

Florov
firstnameФлоров, Фролов. This patronymic surname, sometimes also written as Frolov, is derived from Flor, a diminutive form of the men’s names Frol, Florian and Florentii. The Florovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code F461]

Fofanov
firstnameФофанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Fofan, a diminutive form of the men’s name Feofan. The Fofanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fofanoff, Fofonoff, Fofenoff, Fofonow, Fofon, Fofanow, Fofanove, Foffonoff, Fofonove, Fafanow, Hohanoff, Khokhanoff.  [Soundex Code F151]

Fominov
firstnameФоминов (Фомин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Fomin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Foma. The Fominovs (Fomins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Famenoff, Faminoff, Fominoff, Faminow, Fomenoff, Fomonoff, Fominow, Fominove, Faminove, Feminoff, Khominov, Khominoff, Khaminoff. [Soundex Code F551; F550]

Frolov
firstnameФролов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Frol. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zbitnev family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code F641]

– G/H –

Galaktionov
firstnameГалактионов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Galaktion. The Galaktionovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G423]

Gankin
firstnameГанкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Gan’ka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Gavriil. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G525]

Gavrilov
firstnameГаврилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Gavriil. The Gavrilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G64]

Gavrushin
firstnameГаврушин. Gavrushin is derived from Gavrusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Gavriil. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shchukin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code G162]

Gerasimov
firstnameГерасимов. Gerasimov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Gerasim. The Gerasimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Herasimoff, Harasemow, Herasemoff, Harasymoff, Garasimoff, Gerasimoff, Harasimoff, Gerasimow, Herasimow, Harrasomoff, Herasimov, Harasamow, Gerasimove, Herasimove, Harasmoff.  [Soundex Code G625; H625]

Gibanov
nicknameГибанов. This surname originates from gibat’ meaning “to be flexible” or “to be bendible”. The term giban may have referred to a flexible or bendible person. The Gibanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Krasnoyarsk, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G151]

Gilev
nicknameГилев. This surname originates from the dialect term gil’ meaning “bullfinch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bullfinch, perhaps a stocky, bull-headed or singing individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term gilyami, meaning “prankster” or “joker”. There were two unrelated branches of the Gilevs among the Doukhobors: the first resided in the Irkutsk region, and the second resided in the Tobolsk-Yenisei region and later the Amur region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Glagolev
nicknameГлаголев. This surname originates from the Church Slavonic term glagol, meaning “word” or “verb”. This term has a specific religious connotation and refers to the “Word of the Gospel”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hlaholoff, Glagoloff, Glagoleff, Glegoloff, Glagolow, Hlaholow, Glagolieff, Glagolov, Hlaholov, Glagolove.  [Soundex Code G424; H441]

Glaskov
nicknameГласков. This surname originates from glasok, a diminutive form of the term glas (“voice”) meaning “little voice’. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term glaz, meaning “eyes”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Glasgoff, Glaskoff, Hlaskoff, Glaskow, Hlaskow, Glaskov, Glaskove.  [Soundex Code G421]

Glebov
firstnameГлебов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Gleb. The Glebovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hleboff, Gleboff, Kleboff, Hlebow, Glaboff, Glebow, Hlebov, Glebove, Hlebove.  [Soundex Code G411; H411]

Glukhov
nicknameГлухов. This surname originates from the term glukhoi, meaning “deaf”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was deaf or hard of hearing. The Glukhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hlookoff, Hlukoff, Hlookow, Hlukow, Holukoff, Glukhoff, Gulokoff, Glookoff, Hlukhov, Hlokoff, Glukove, Luekov.  [Soundex Code G421; H421]

Gnezdilov
nicknameГнездилов, Гнездилин. This surname, sometimes also written as Gnezdilin,  originates from the verb gnezdit’sia meaning “to make nests”. Gnezdilo was the nickname given to a “nest builder”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gnezdiloff, Gnezdeloff, Gnesdeloff, Gnusdeloff, Grusdeloff.  [Soundex Code G523]

Golenishchev
nicknameГоленищев. This surname originates from golenishche, meaning “leg of the boot”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or wearer of footwear.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb golenit’ meaning “to shout moderately” or “to be lazy”.  The Golenishchevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G452]

Golishchev
nicknameГолыщев. This surname originates from golishche, a diminutive form of the term golyi, meaning “naked”, “bare” or “impoverished”. The Golishchevs among thиe Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Golischev, Golishcheff, Golischeff, Halisheff, Halishoff, Galisheff, Halishow, Galishoff, Holishchev.  [Soundex Code G421; G422]

Gololobov
nicknameГололобов. This surname originates from the term golyi (“bare”) + lob (“forehead”) or “bare-forehead”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone balding or without a cap. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G441]

Golovanov
nicknameГолованов. This surname originates from golovan, an augmentative form of the term golova (“head”) meaning “big head”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a large head, or perhaps a clever and acute individual. The Golovanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G415]

Golovin
nicknameГоловин. This surname originates from the term golova, meaning “head”. This term may refer to the anatomy or to the leader of a household, village or military unit. The Golovins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G415]

Golubenko
nicknameГолубенко. This name is properly Golubov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Golubov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code G411]

Golubov
nicknameГолубов. Golubov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term golub, meaning “pigeon” or “dove”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a keeper of doves, an amourous person, or someone mild and gentle as a dove. The Golubovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Holuboff, Goluboff, Goloboff, Holoboff, Holobow, Golobow, Golobeff, Holubow, Hulobow, Holubov, Golubev, Globoff, Golubove, Holubove.  [Soundex Code G411; H411]

Goncharov
occupationalГончаров. This surname originates from the term gonchar, meaning “potter”, a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay. The Goncharovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hancheroff, Hancharoff, Hencheroff, Hancherow, Honcharoff, Goncharoff, Hancharow, Honcharow, Hanchoroff, Honchareff, Goncharow, Honcharov, Hancheroe, Goncharove, Honcharove, Hanch.  [Soundex Code G526; H526]

Gontarenkov
occupationalГонтаренков (Гонтаренко). Among the Doukhobors, Gontarenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Gontarenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term gontar’, meaning “roofer”, a craftsman who built, shingled and repaired roofs. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G536]

Gontsov
occupationalГонцов. This surname is derived from the term gonets, meaning “messenger” or “courier”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G532]

Gordeev
firstnameГордеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Gordei. The Gordeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G631]

Gorelkin
nicknameГорелкин. This surname originates from the dialect term gorelka, meaning “vodka”, “cornbrandy” or “spirits”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a brewer or drinker of such beverages. lEnglish spelling variants include: Harelkin, Harelken, Horelken, Horelkin, Garelkin.  [Soundex Code G642; H642]

Gor’kov
nicknameГорьков, Горькин. This surname, sometimes also written as Gor’kin, originates from the term gor’kiy, meaning “bitter” or “sour”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Gor’ka, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Georgii, Gorazd, Gordei, Gorislav, Grigori and Egor. The Gor’kovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the eighth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorkoff, Horkoff, Horokoff, Horcoff, Gorkow, Horkow, Harcoff, Harkoff, Horkov, Gor’kov, Gorkove, Horkove. [Soundex Code G621; H621]

Gorlov
nicknameГорлов. This surname originates from the term gorlo, meaning “throat”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bykanov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. A second unrelated Gorlov family of Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G641]

Gorshenin
occupationalГоршенин. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term gorshenya meaning “potter”, a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay. The Gorshenins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Harshenin, Harshenyin, Harshenen, Horshenin. [Soundex Code G625; H625]

Gorshkov
nicknameГоршков. Gorshkov is derived from gorshok, meaning “pot”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gorshenin family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code G625]

Gremyakin
nicknameГремякин. Gremyakin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the dialectic term gremyaka, meaning “roaring”, “thundering” or “rattling”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with an exceptionally loud and thundering voice. The Gremyakins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hrimakin, Grimakin, Gremakin, Hremakin, Gremiakin, Hremiakin, Hremyakin.  [Soundex Code G652; H652]

Grigor’ev
firstnameГригорьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Grigory. There were two unrelated branches of the Grigor’evs among the Doukhobors: the first originated in Tambov province in the 18th century, and the second resided in the Tobolsk-Yenisei region and later the Amur region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G626]

Gritchin
firstnameГритчин. This patronymic surname is derived from Gritka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Grigory. The Gritchins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gretchen, Gretchin, Gritchin, Grichin, Gritchen, Hrychyn.  [Soundex Code G632]

Grobovshchikov
occupationalГробовщиков. This surname derives from the term grobovshik, meaning “undertaker” or “coffin-maker”, someone who prepared dead corpses for burial. The Grobovshchikovs among the Doukhobors originated from Voronezh province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G611]

Grushkin
locationalГрушкин. This surname originates from the term grushka, meaning “pear tree” and may refer to someone who lived near a pear tree or orchard. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Grushka, a diminutive form of the women’s names Agrafena and Tigriya.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Hrooshkin, Grooshkin, Hrushkin.  [Soundex Code G622; H622]

Gubanov
nicknameГубанов. This surname originates from guban, an augmentative form of the term gub (“lips”) meaning “big lips”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large or prominent lips, or perhaps a sullen, pouting individual. The Gubanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hubanoff, Goobanoff, Hoobanoff, Hoobonoff, Gubanow, Hubanow, Hubonoff, Goobanow, Hoobanow, Hubanov, Gubanove, Hubanove[Soundex Code G151; H151]

Gudkov
nicknameГудков. This surname originates from the term gudok, meaning “hooter”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who hooted, shouted or hollered. The Gudkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G321]

Gulyaev
nicknameГуляев. This surname originates from the verb gulyat’ meaning “to walk” or “to stroll”. Note that this verb also means “to idle” or “to make merry”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic men’s name Gulya or from Gulya, a diminutive form of several Russian men’s names including Sergei, Georgii and Igor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Goolieff, Hoolaeff, Hoolioff, Gooliaff, Gulaeff, Guliov, Goolaeff, Goolayoff, Hoolieff, Goloff, Holoff, Golieff, Hoolaiff, Guliaiff, Gulioff, Hulaev, Gulaev, Gulyaev, Gulieff, Huliaev, Hoolaef, Hulyaev, Gooliaf.  [Soundex Code G410; H410]

– I –

Ignatov
firstnameИгнатов. Ignatov is derived from the men’s name Ignaty. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code I253]

Iglov
nicknameИглов. This surname originates from the term igla, meaning “needle”. This term may have been given as a nickname to tailor or seamstress who used a needle as part of their handiwork.  Note that this term also referred to a “sharp” or “brisk” person. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I241]

Igolkin
firstnameИголкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Igol’ka, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Ioil’. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term igolka, meaning “needle”. The Igolkins among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century, resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I242]

Il’yasov
firstnameИльясов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Il’yas. lEnglish spelling variants include: Elasoff, Elasow, Oolasoff, Olisoff, Iliasov, Il’yasov.  [Soundex Code E421]

Il’in
firstnameИльин (Ильинов). This surname is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Il’ya. The Il’ins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. It was later modified to Il’inov by some family members in the early 20th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I450]

Isakin
firstnameИсакин (Сакин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Sakin. The “I” was addedin the second half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from Saka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Isak. The Isakins (Sakins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Esakin, Esaken.  [Soundex Code I225; E225]

Ishchenkov
firstnameИщенков. Ishchenkov is derived from Ishchenko, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Samoylov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code I225]

Istrebov
nicknameИстребов. Istrebov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term istrebitel’ (“annihilator”). It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vremya istrebleniya (“time of annihilation”). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as a title or nickname for Peter Petrovich Verigin (1904-1942), son of Doukhobor leader Peter Chistiakov Verigin.  [Soundex Code Y236]

Ivanov
firstnameИванов. Ivanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Ivan. There were several unrelated branches of Ivanovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Penza and Kherson in the 18th century. Note that Ivanov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ivin family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code I151]

Ivashin
firstnameИвашин. This patronymic surname is derived from Ivash, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. The Ivashins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ewashin, Ewashen.  [Soundex Code I125]

Ivin
locationalИвин. This surname originates from the term iva, meaning “willow” and may refer to someone who lived near a willow tree or grove. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Iva, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ewin, Iven, Evin, Evan, Ewan, Evans.  [Soundex Code I150]

Ivliev
firstnameИвлиев. Ivliev is derived from Ivlii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Iolii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Krygin family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code I141]

– K –

Kabatov
nicknameКабатов. Kabatov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term kabat, a type of sleeveless coat worn in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a kabat, or perhaps a maker of such garments. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kabatoff, Cabotoff, Kabatow, Kabatove.  [Soundex Code K131]

Kablov
nicknameКаблов. This surname originates from the term kobyla, meaning “mare” (a female horse). It is also suggested that the name can derive from kobel, a male dog. The Kablovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kachalov
nicknameКачалов. This surname originates from kachalo or kachala, meaning the “drunk”, “idler” or “squanderer”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kakhov
nicknameКахов. This surname originates from the dialect verb kokhati, meaning “to love”.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kokh, meaning “basket”. The Kakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kalachev
nicknameКалачев. Kalachev is derived from the term kalach, meaning “loaf” (of bread). Note that this term also referred to a “rogue”, “sly” or “cunning” fellow. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Evdokimov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code K421]

Kalmykov
locationalКалмыков. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Kalmyks, a Mongol people who derived their name from the Turkic word kalmyk meaning “to remain”. It may also refer to a non-Kalmyk Russian with facial features like those of a Kalmyk. The Kalmykovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. This surname was borne by several Doukhobor leaders including Vasily Kalmykov (1792-1832), Ilarion Kalmykov (1816-1841), Peter Kalmykov (1836-1864) and Lukeria Kalmykova (1841-1886). lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalmakov, Kalmikov, Kolmakov, Kolmykov, Kalmokov, Calmakov, Kalmakoff, Kalmacoff, Kalmokoff, Kalmikoff, Kalmeikoff, Kolmokoff, Kalmykoff, Kolmakoff, Kolmakof, Kalmykow, Kalmakow, Kolmekow, Kolmikow, Kolmakow, Kalmikove, Kalmakove.  [Soundex Code K452]

Kanygin
firstnameКаныгин. This patronymic surname is derived from Konyga, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konon. The Kanygins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kanigan, Kanegin, Kanigin, Konegen, Kanegan, Konigan, Konigin, Konygin, Kanigen.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kapustin
nicknameКапустин. This surname originates from the term kapusta, meaning “cabbage”. Note that this surname was borne by Savely Kapustin (1743-1820), leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia from 1792-1805 and in Tavria province, Russia from 1805-1820. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K123]

Karaivanov
nicknameКараиванов. Karaivanov is derived from the Turkic term kara (“black”) + the Russian men’s name Ivan to form the nickname “Black Ivan”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code K615]

Karev
nicknameКарев. This surname originates from the term karii, meaning “brown” or “hazel” eye colouring. Note that this term was also used in some Russian dialects to refer to someone with a brown and swarthy complexion. The Karevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kareff, Karoff, Kariff. [Soundex Code K610]

Kasagov
locationalКасагов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term kasag, meaning “Circassian” and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Circassians in the North Caucasus. Note that this term also means “Cossack” in Old Russian. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kosagov, Kasogov, Kasagoff, Kasahoff, Kasohoff[Soundex Code K221]

Kashkov
nicknameКашков. Kashkov is derived from the Tatar term kashka, meaning “bald”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Obed’kov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K221]

Katasonov
locationalКатасонов. This surname indicates a family that originated from the North Caucasian town of Katason. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katasonoff, Katasanoff, Katasonow, Kotusonoff, Katasonove.  [Soundex Code K325]

Katunin
firstnameКатунин. Katunin is derived from Katunya, a diminutive form of the women’s name Ekaterina. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code K355]

Kazakov
locationalКазаков. This locative name originates from kazak, meaning “Cossack”. The Cossacks descend from runaway Russian and Ukrainian serfs and independent Tatar groups who established free self-governing communities on the southern steppes in the 15th century. Renowned horsemen, adventurers, frontiersmen, warriors, rebels, freebooters and bandits, the Cossacks established their own independent cultural tradition and were granted special freedoms and privileges by Russian, Polish and Turkish rulers in return for military service. The Kazakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fourth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cazakoff, Kazakoff, Kazakow, Kozakoff, Casacove, Kazakove, Kasikoff, Kasakoff.  [Soundex Code K221]

Khabarov
nicknameХабаров. This surname originates from the Old Russian term khabar, meaning “lucky”, “happy” or “profitable”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a fortunate individual or to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kaboroff, Kabaroff, Khabarow, Khabarove, Kabarow, Chabaroff, Habaroff.  [Soundex Code K161]

Kharin
firstnameХарин. This patronymic surname is derived from Kharya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Khariton. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code K650]

Khilimov
firstnameХилимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Khilim, a diminutive form of the men’s name Filimon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K451]

Khimin
firstnameХимин. This patronymic surname is derived from Khima, a diminutive form of the men’s names Efim and Arkhimed. The Khimins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K550]

Khodykin
nicknameХодыкин. This surname originates from the term khodyka, meaning “walker”, “pacer” or “foot-messenger”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hadekin, Hadikin, Khadekin, Hadiken, Hadican, Hudekin, Hadikan, Khodikin, Khadikin, Chodikin.  [Soundex Code K325; H325]

Khokhlin
nicknameХохлин. This surname originates from the term khokhol, meaning a “forelock”, “tuft” or “crest” of hair on a head. Note that khokhol was also a derogatory Russian term for a Ukrainian. The Khokhlins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hohlen, Hohlin.  [Soundex Code K245; H450]

Kholodinin
nicknameХолодинин. This surname originates from the term kholodnii, meaning “cold”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kholodinins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolodinin, Kalidin, Holodinin.  [Soundex Code K435]

Khramtsov
firstnameХрамцов. This patronymic surname is derived from Khromets, a diminutive form of the men’s names Khromei, Vakhromei and Varfolomey. It is also suggested that the name can derive from khromets, the term for a “lame” person. The Khramtsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E653]

Khrolov
firstnameХролов. Khrolov is derived from Khrol, a diminutive form of the men’s name Frol. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K641]

Khudyakov
nicknameХудяков. This surname originates from the term khudyak, meaning a “thin” or “poor” person. The Khudyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Khudyakov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Tomilin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code L550] lEnglish spelling variants include: Hoodikoff, Hoodicoff, Foodikoff, Fudikuf, Hoodecoff, Hudakoff, Hudakow, Hoodakow, Khudiakoff, Hudikoff, Chudyakow, Chudiakow, Chudiakoff, Hudjakoff, Hoodakoff, Khudiakov, Hoodikove, Hudikove.  [Soundex Code K321; H321]

Khvenyatkin
firstnameХвеняткин. Khvenyatkin is derived from Khvenyatka or Fenyatka, a diminutive form of the women’s name Fedosia. Among the Doukhobors it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the D’yakov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose matriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K153]

Kinyakin
firstnameКинякин. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Kinyaka. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kinyakin, Kinakin, Kinaken.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kireev
firstnameКиреев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kirei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kirill. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kereiff, Keraiff, Karaioff, Kireiff, Kiraoff, Kireyev, Kureev, Kureyev.  [Soundex Code K610]

Kirilov
firstnameКирилов. Kirilov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Kirill. The Kirilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kiselev
nicknameКиселев. This surname originates from the term kisel’, a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Kiselevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kislin
nicknameКислин. Kislin originates from the term kislii, meaning “sour”, “acid” or “tart”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gor’kov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code K245]

Kislyakov
nicknameКисляков. This surname derives from the term kislii, meaning “sour”, “acid” or “tart”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from kislyai, the nickname for a “languid” or “moppish” fellow. The Kislyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K242]

Kitaev
firstnameКитаев. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Kitai. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K310]

Kliment’ev
firstnameКлиментьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Klimentii. The Kliment’evs among the Doukhobors resided in the Amur region in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K455]

Klimov
firstnameКлимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Klim. The Klimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K451]

Klyuev
nicknameКлюев. This surname originates from the term klyui, meaning “peck”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who pecked, either in the literal sense of striking or picking at something, or in the figurative sense of criticizing, carping or bothering persistently. The term may also refer to someone with a long aquiline nose similar to a beak (klyuv). Note that this term also meant “sleepy” in some Russian dialects. The Klyuevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K410]

Kobzenko
nicknameКобзенко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kobza, a type of round string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played or manufactured the kobza. The Kobzenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kochatov
firstnameКочатов. This surname originates from the Mordvinian men’s name Kochat.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term kochet, meaning “cock” (rooster). The Kochatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K 231]

Kolbasov
nicknameКолбасов (Колбаса). Among the Doukhobors, Kolbasov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Kolbasa. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the Ukrainian term kolbasa, meaning “sausage”. The Kolbasovs (Kolbasas) among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K412]

Kolbov
nicknameКолбов. This surname originates from the dialect term kolob, meaning a “small, round loaf” (of bread). Note that this term also referred to a round, portly individual. The Kolbovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K411]

Kolesnik
occupationalКолесник. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning “wheelwright”, a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carriages, etc. The Kolesniks among the Doukhobors originated from the Poltava-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolesnikov
occupationalКолесников. This surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning “wheelwright”, a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carriages, etc. Note that this surname was borne by Selivan Kolesnikov, leader of the Doukhobors in Ekaterinoslav province, Russia from 1740-1775. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolesnikoff, Kalesnikoff, Kalesniko, Kolesnikow, Koolesnikoff, Kalesnikow, Kolesnikove.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolodin
nicknameКолодин. This surname derives from the term koloda, meaning “block” or “log”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Kolosov
nicknameКолосов. Kolosov originates from the term kolos, meaning “ear” (of corn, wheat, etc). Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kolosoff, Klasoff, Kolosow. [Soundex Code K421]

Kondrashev
firstnameКондрашев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kondrasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kondratii. The Kondrashevs among the Doukhobors resided in Samara province, Russia in the early- to mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K536]

Kondrat’ev
firstnameКондратьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Kondratii.  The original Kondrat’evs among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. No members of this family immigrated to Canada. However, a second family of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Strukov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondratoff, Kondratieff, Kondratow.  [Soundex Code K536]

Konforkin
nicknameКонфоркин. Konforkin is derived from the dialect term konforka, meaning “spirit-lamp”, a lamp or burner that burns alcohol. Note that this term also refers to the “crown” of a samovar where tea is warmed. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the D’yakov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K516]

Konkin
firstnameКонкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Konka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konon. Note that kon’ka is also a diminutive form of the term kon’ (“horse”) meaning “little horse”. The Konkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the third most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konken, Conkin.  [Soundex Code K525]

Konovalov
occupationalКоновалов. Konovalov is derived from the term konoval, meaning “horse doctor” – someone whose trade involved the care and treatment of horses for disease and injuries, birthing and gelding. Among the Doukhobors, it originated in the late 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a family from Tiflis province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified.  [Soundex Code K514]

Kopylov
nicknameКопылов. This surname originates from the dialect term kopyl‘ meaning “post”, “strut”, “staff”, “distaff” or “column”. Note that this term also refers to an “obstinate”, “proud” or “uncompromising” person. The Kopylovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Korenev
nicknameКоренев. This surname originates from the term koren‘ meaning “root”. Note that this term also refers to an “obstinate”, “severe” or “avaricious” person. The Korenevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K651]

Korolev
nicknameКоролев. This surname originates from the term korol, meaning “king”. It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term “king” was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Karaloff, Karoloff, Koroleff, Koraleff, Karaleff, Karloff, Korolov, Koroliov, Korolyov, Korolove, Korolow.  [Soundex Code K641]

Korpusov
nicknameКорпусов. This surname originates from the Latin term korpus, meaning a “large body” or “collection” of writings. Latin-derived surnames arose almost exclusively from among the Russian Orthodox clergy. Hence, this nickname may have been given to an Orthodox monk or seminary student who was particularly well-read and studious. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K612]

Korovnikov
occupationalКоровников. This surname derives from the term korovnik, meaning “cow dealer” or “cow breeder”. The Korovnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K615]

Kostikov
firstnameКостиков. Kostikov is derived from Kostik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konstantin. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Salykin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code K232]

Kostrikov
nicknameКостриков. This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Note that this term also refers to “fire” as well as a “growling” or “grumbling” person.  The Kostrikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kastrukoff, Castrucow, Castrukow, Kastrukow, Kostrukow, Kostrikoff, Kostrikow, Kostrukoff, Kastrukove, Kostrikove.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kotel’nikov
occupationalКотельников. This surname originates from the term kotel’nik, meaning “brazier”, a craftsman who manufactured kettles, pots, samovars, cauldrons and other metal vessels. The Kotel’nikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotelnikoff, Katelnikoff, Kotelnikow, Katelnikow, Kotel’nikov, Kotelnikove.  [Soundex Code K345]

Kotov
nicknameКотов. Kotov originates from the term kot, meaning “tom-cat”. Another possible origin is from the first name Kotya, a diminutive form of Konstantin. There were two unrelated branches of Kotovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Voronezh and Omsk in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotoff, Katoff. [Soundex Code K310]

Kovalev
occupationalКовалев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term koval, meaning “blacksmith”, a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for blacksmith – kuznets) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. The Kovalevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kavaloff, Kavaleff, Kovaleff, Kowaleff, Kawaleff, Kafaleff, Kovalov, Kovaliov, Kovalyov, Kovalove.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kozhokin
nicknameКожакин. This surname originates from the term kozha, meaning “leather”, “hide” or “skin”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term kozhukh, a sheepskin coat worn by peasants in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K225]

Kozlachkov
nicknameКозлачков. This surname originates from the term kozlochka, meaning “kid” (a young goat). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. The Kozlachkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K242]

Kozlov
nicknameКозлов (Козёл). This surname originates from the term kozyol, meaning “goat”.  There were four unrelated branches of Kozlovs among the Doukhobors. First, Kozlov occurred as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family of Doukhobors in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century. Second, male and female members of a Kozlov family, originally of Molokan ancestry, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century after marrying into SamoylovChernov and Kanygin families. Third, female members of a Kozlov family, originally of Russian Orthodox ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Yakutsk province, Russia in the late 19th century after marrying into the Dergausov and Morozov families. Fourth, a Kozyol family, originally of Belarusian ancestry from Brest province, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century after marrying into the Terekhov family. Thereafter, they Russianized their Belarusian surname to Kozlov with the addition of an -ov suffix ending. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozlow, Koslow, Kaslow, Kozloff.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kozodoev
nicknameКозодоев. This surname originates from the dialect term kozodoy, meaning “nightjar” (bird species). It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term koza (“goat”) + doit’ (“to milk”) and refer to somone who “milked goats”. The Kozodoevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K231]

Kozorev
nicknameКозорев. This surname originates from the term kozyr, meaning “trump”, a playing card of a suit that won over a card of a different suit.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a card-player. Note that this term also referred to a courageous, quick or brisk person, as well as a proud, haughty or dandy person.  The Kozorevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K261]

Krasnikov
nicknameКрасников. This surname originates from the Old Russian term krasnyi, meaning “beautiful” or “handsome”. Note that since this surname was formed, the term krasnyi has come to mean “red” in Russian and the term krasivyi is now used to decribe “beautiful” or “handsome”. The Krasnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krasnikoff, Krasnikow, Krasnikove.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krechetov
nicknameКречетов. This surname originates from krechet, meaning “gyrfalcon”, the largest species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. The Krechetovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kherson, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K623]

Krikunov
nicknameКрикунов (Крикун). Among the Doukhobors, Krikunov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Krikun. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the Ukrainian term krikun, meaning “crier”, “shrieker” or “screamer”. The Krikunovs (Krikuns) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krikunoff, Krikunow.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krivobokov
nicknameКривобоков. This surname originates from the term krivoi (“crooked” or “curved”) + bok (“side”), meaning “lop-sided” or “crippled”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  The Krivobokovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K611]

Krivorukov
nicknameКриворуков. This surname is derived from the term krivoi (“crooked” or “curved”) + ruka (“hand” or “arm”), meaning “crooked-armed”. The Krivorukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K616]

Krivov
nicknameКривов. This surname originates from the term krivoi, meaning “crooked” or “curved”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. The Krivovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K 611]

Kruglov
nicknameКруглов. This surname originates from the term kruglyi, meaning “round”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of round and portly build. According to tradition, members of this family adopted the new surname Uglov after joining the Doukhobor movementAmong the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K624]

Krygin
nicknameКрыгин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term kryga, meaning “fishing net”. Note that this term also referred to ice floating on a body of water. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kreehin, Kragin, Krigin, Krihin, Kreagin, Kreihin.  [Soundex Code K625]

Krylov
nicknameКрылов. This surname is derived from the term krylo, meaning “wing”. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and had a specific religious connotation of “angel wings”. The Krylovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K641]

Kryuchkov
nicknameКрючков. This surname originates from the term kryuchok, meaning “hook”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. The Kryuchkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Moskov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K621]

Kryukov
nicknameКрюков. This surname originates from the term kryuk, meaning “hook”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Krukoff, Krukow, Kriukov.  [Soundex Code K621]

Kuchaev
firstnameКучаев. This surname originates from the Mordvinian men’s name Kuchai. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kuchin
nicknameКучин. This surname originates from the term kucha, meaning “heap”, “pile”, “mound”, “crowd” or “mob”. Note that this term also referred to a “pig sty” or “chicken coop”. The Kuchins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koochin, Kootchin, Kouchin, Kutchin.  [Soundex Code K250]

Kudinov
firstnameКудинов. This patronymic surname is derived from Kudin, a diminutive form of the men’s name Akindin.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term kudai, meaning “God” or “Allah”. The Kudinovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K351]

Kudrin
nicknameКудрин. This surname originates from the term kudra, meaning “curly haired” and was given to someone who matched this physical description. Note that this term also referred to a “trickster” or “joker”. The Kudrins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koodrin, Kodrin.  [Soundex Code K365]

Kudryavtsev
nicknameКудрявцев. This surname originates from the dialect term kudryavtsa, meaning “curly haired” and was given to someone who matched this physical description. The Kudryavtsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Saratov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K361]

Kukhtin
nicknameКухтин. This surname originates from the term kukhta, meaning “hoarfrost”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kukhtins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K235]

Kukhtinov
nicknameКухтинов (Кухтин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Kukhtin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term kukhta, meaning “hoarfrost”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. The Kukhtinovs (Kukhtins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koftinoff, Kooftinoff, Kuftinoff, Koftinow, Kooftinow, Kuftinow, Kaftinoff, Kuchtinoff, Kuftinove, Kuftin, Kuftinov, Kukhtinoff.  [Soundex Code K235] 

Kukanov
nicknameКуканов. Kukanov is derived from the dialect term kukan, a rope used by fisherman to string caught fish. Note that this term also refers to someone put in bondage. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Dement’ev family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code K251]

Kulichkin
nicknameКуличкин. This surname derives from the dialect term kulichek, meaning “snipe”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kulichka, a type of “sweet cake”. The Kulichkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K422]

Kunavin
firstnameКунавин. This surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Kunava. The Kunavins among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K515]

Kurbatov
nicknameКурбатов. This surname originates from the Turkic term kurbat, meaning “short” or “fat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of short and stocky build. The Kurbatovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koorbatoff, Kurbatoff, Kurbatow, Korbatoff, Koorbatow.  [Soundex Code K613]

Kurenev
firstnameКуренев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kuren, a diminutive form of the men’s names KirillKir and Kuprian. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term kuren, meaning “peasant hut” or “Cossack village”. The Kurenevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kernoff, Kurnoff, Kurenoff, Kernow, Kurenow, Korenoff, Karenoff, Kareneff, Kurenov, Kureniov, Kurenyov, Kuranov, Kurenove.  [Soundex Code K651]

Kurnavin
nicknameКурнавин. This surname originates from the dialect term kurnava, meaning “curly” or “twisted”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb kurnyavit’ meaning “to sing quietly or muffled”. The Kurnavins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K651]

Kuskov
nicknameКусков. This surname originates from the terms kusok or kuska, meaning “piece”, “morsel” or “bit”.  The Kuskovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kutyrkin
nicknameКутыркин. Kutyrkin is derived from the dialect term kutyrka, meaning “glutton” or “greedy eater”. Note that this term also referred to someone who upsets, capsizes, somersaults or falls over. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zhuravlev family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code K362]

Kutnyakov
nicknameКутняков. This surname originates from the term kutnik, meaning “cellar”, “exit”, “corner”, “counter” and “molar” in various dialects. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kutnya, meaning “barn”, “tent”, “top” or “molar”. The Kutnyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kootnikoff, Kootnekoff, Kootenekoff, Kutnikoff, Kootnakoff, Kutnikow, Kootnikow, Kutniakov, Kutnikove, Kutnekoff, Kutniakoff.  [Soundex Code K352]

Kuzin
firstnameКузин. Kuzin is derived from Kuzya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kuzma. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Sherstobitov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koozin, Koozen, Kuzen.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuzmin
firstnameКузмин. Kuzmin is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Kuzma. The Kuzmins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuznetsov
occupationalКузнецов. Kuznetsov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from the term kuznets, meaning “blacksmith”, a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. There were several unrelated branches of Kuznetsovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and Voronezh as well as the Don region. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kooznetsoff, Kooznitsoff, Kouznitsoff, Kusnetsoff, Kusnetzoff, Kuznetzoff, Kuznitsoff, Kuznitzoff, Kuznetsow, Kuznetsove.  [Soundex Code K253]

– L –

Lakhtin
firstnameЛахтин. This patronymic surname is derived from Lakta, a diminutive form of the men’s name Galaktion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term lakhta, meaning “sea gulf” or “bay”. The Lakhtins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lactin, Lacton, Lackton, Latkin, Lachtin, Lakten, Lacktin, Laktin.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lapin
nicknameЛапин. This surname is derived from the term lapa, meaning “paw” or “pad”. The Lapins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L150]

Lapshinov
nicknameЛапшинов (Лапшин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Lapshin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term lapsha, meaning “noodles”. The Lapshinovs (Lapshins) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lapshinoff, Lopshinoff, Lapshinow, Lapshinove.  [Soundex Code L125]

Laptev
nicknameЛаптев. Laptev is derived from the term lapot’ meaning “bast shoe”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Skachkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code L131]

Larin
firstnameЛарин. This patronymic surname is derived from Larya, a dimunitive form of the men’s name Ilarion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the nickname lar, meaning “chest” or “strongbox”. The Larins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Laren.  [Soundex Code L650]

Lavrenchenkov
firstnameЛавренченков (Лавренченко). Among the Doukhobors, Lavrenchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Lavrenchenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from Lavrenka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lavrentii. It was later shortened to Lavrenov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lavrenchenko, Lavrenchenkoff, Lavrenchenkow, Lawrenchenkoff, Lavrenchinkoff, Lovrenchenkoff, Lavrench, Lovernoff, Lovernow, Lawrenow, Loverenow, Lawrenoff, Lawreno. [Soundex Code L165]

Lavrent’ev
firstnameЛаврентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Lavrentii. The Lavrent’evs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code L165]

Lavrov
firstnameЛавров. Lavrov is derived from Lavra, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lavrentii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bondarev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Loveroff, Lavroff.  [Soundex Code L161]

Lavrushin
firstnameЛаврушин. Lavrushin is derived from Lavrusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lavrentii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bondarev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L162]

Lazarev
firstnameЛазарев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Lazar. The Lazarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazareff, Lazaroff, Lazeroff, Lazarow. [Soundex Code L261]

Lazunin
firstnameЛазунин. Lazunin is derived from Lazunya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lazar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl’kov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L255]

Lebedev
nicknameЛебедев. Lebedev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term lebed, meaning “swan”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a swan, perhaps a graceful, pure or beautiful individual. The Lebedevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebedoff, Lebidoff, Lebedeff, Lebedow, Lebedove.  [Soundex Code L131]

Leonov
firstnameЛеонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Leon. The Leonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Leonoff, Leonow.  [Soundex Code L510]

Lepekhin
nicknameЛепехин. This surname originates from the term lepekha, meaning “pancake” or “flat cake”. Note that this term also referred to a “slow, portly person”. The Lepekhins among the Doukhobors originated from Astrakhan province, Russia in the 18th century, resided in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L125]

Leshchenko
firstnameЛещенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Leshka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Alexei. The Leshchenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L252]

Lesnikov
locationalЛесников. This surname originates from the term lesnik, meaning “forester”, an inhabitant of a forest (les) or wood. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L252]

Letyagin
nicknameЛетягин. This surname originates from the verb letat’ meaning “to fly” or “to take flight”. Letyaga was the nickname given to one who flies or takes flight. Note that it also referred to a species of bat. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L325]

Levanov
firstnameЛеванов. Levanov is derived from Levan, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lev. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code L151]

Levadny
locationalЛевадний. This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term levada, meaning “pasture” or “meadow” and may refer to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L135]

Lezhebokov
nicknameЛежебоков. This surname originates from the term lezheboka, meaning “sluggard”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lazy or idle individual who preferred to lie (lezhat’ ) on his side (bok) rather than work. The Lezhebokovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Legebokoff, Legebokow, Legebow, Lezhebokoff, Ledgebokoff, Lidkobakoff, Lishabokoff, Legebekoff, Lezhebokow, Lejebokoff, Lezhebokove.  [Soundex Code L212]

Likharev
nicknameЛихарев. This surname originates from the term likhar, meaning “sorcerer”. Note that this term also referred to an “ill-natured” person, a “daring fellow” and a “userer”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L261]

Lipatov
firstnameЛипатов. Among the Doukhobors, Lipatov is derived from the dialect verb lipet’ meaning “to adhere”, “to stick” or “to be linked”. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname is commonly derived from Lipatii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ipatii. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lobintsev
locationalЛобинцев. This surname originates from Lobinets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Lobin or Lobni in Old Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term lobanets, meaning “high-brow”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebentsoff, Lobintsoff, Labintsoff, Lebentseff, Lobintseff, Labinsoff, Lobinsoff, Lobintsove.  [Soundex Code L152]

Loktev
nicknameЛоктев. This surname originates from the term lokot’ meaning “elbow”. The Loktevs among the Doukhobors originated from Tavria (Tauride) province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L231]

Lomazov
nicknameЛомазов. This surname originates from the verb lomat’ meaning “to break”. The Lomazovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L521]

Lukin
nicknameЛукин. This surname originates from the term luka, meaning “onion”. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Luka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lukyan. The Lukins among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Luk’yanov
firstnameЛукьянов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Lukyan. The Luk’yanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lukianoff, Lukanoff, Lukyanoff, Lukenoff, Loukianoff, Lukanow, Lukyanov, Loukianow, Lukanove.  [Soundex Code L251]

Lunin
nicknameЛунин. Lunin is derived from the term lun, meaning “kestrel”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Lunya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lukian. The original Lunins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Note that Lunin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Svetlichny family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, as well as a branch of the Kalmykov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century.  [Soundex Code L550]

Luponosov
nicknameЛупоносов. This surname is derived from the verb lupit’ (“to peel”) + nos (“nose”), meaning “peel the nose”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term luponoska, a type of wild duck. The Luponosovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L152]

Lyubimov
nicknameЛюбимов. This surname originates from the term lyubimyy, meaning “beloved” or “favorite”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a beloved child by his or her parents. The Lyubimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L151]

– M –

Makarov
firstnameМакаров. Makarov is derived from the men’s name Makar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaroff, Makareff, Makarow.  [Soundex Code M261]

Makaseev
occupationalМакасеев (Мукосеев). This surname was originally written as Mukoseev and is derived from the term mukosei, meaning “flour-sifter” or “meal-sifter”. This name was given to a baker’s assistant who prepared flour for baking. The Makaseevs (Mukoseevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century.lEnglish spelling variants include: Makasaeff, Mokasayeff, Makasoff, Makoseoff, Makasaieff, Makasaew, Mukoseev, Mukoseev, Makaseyeff, Makaseiff, Mokaseyeff, Makosiaeff, Mokosiaeff, Makaseyev, Makasave.  [Soundex Code M221]

Makeev
firstnameМакеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Makei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Makedonii. The original Makeevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Makeev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaeff, Makaoff, Makaiff, Makaiv, Makeef, Makeif, Makeiff, Makeiv, Makeyff, Mackave, McKaeff, Makayeff, Makioff, Makieff, Makayoff, Makeyeff, Makeoff, Makiev, Makeyev, Makave, McKave.  [Soundex Code M210]

Makhonin
occupationalМахонин. This surname is derived from the term makhonya, meaning “the signaler on a vessel”.  Note that this term also referred to a “ingenuous”, “gloomy”, “slight”, “bad” or “unkempt” person in various dialects. There were two unrelated branches of Makhonins among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makonen, Mahonin, Mahonen, Makonin.  [Soundex Code M255]

Makhortov
nicknameМахортов (Мухортов). This surname was originally written as Mukhortov and is derived from mukhort, a term borrowed from the Turkic language describing the “bay” or “chestnut” coloring of a horse. By analogy this term may have been given as a nickname to a brown-haired person. Note that this term also referred to a “thin”, “weak” or “sickly” individual. The Makhortovs (Mukhortovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fifteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makortoff, Mahortoff, McKortoff, Muchortov, Makortow, Makortaff, Makhortow, Macortoff, Makorto, Mukhortov, Makhortove, Mukhortove.  [Soundex Code M263; M631]

Malakhov
firstnameМалахов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Malakhei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term malakhai, meaning “fur cap”. The Malakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malakoff, Malikoff, Malekow, Malekoff, Malokoff, Malahoff, Malakow, Malakoe, Molachoff, Malakhow, Malakove.  [Soundex Code M421]

Malen’kov
nicknameМаленьков. This surname originates from the term malen’kii, meaning “little” or “small”. This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M452]

Malikov
nicknameМаликов. This surname originates from malik, a diminutive form of the term malo, meaning “small”. This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turko-Arabic term malik, meaning “lord” or “noble”. The Malikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malakoff, Malikoff, Malekow, Malekoff, Malahoff, Malakow, Malikove.  [Soundex Code M421]

Malov
nicknameМалов. This surname originates from the term malo, meaning “small”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone small and slight of stature, or perhaps to the youngest child in a family. The Malovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Maloff, Malloff, Malow, Malove, Mallow, Meloff, Mallo.  [Soundex Code M410]

Mamonov
nicknameМамонов. This surname originates from the Turkic term mamon, meaning “modest” or “mild”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Russian dialect term mamon, meaning “belly” or “stomach”. The Mamonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Saratov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M551]

Markin
firstnameМаркин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Mark. The Markins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the sixth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Marken.  [Soundex Code M625]

Markov
firstnameМарков. Markov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Mark. There were several unrelated branches of Markovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav, Penza and Don regions of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Markoff, Marcoff, Markow.  [Soundex Code M621]

Martinov
firstnameМартинов. Martinov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Martin. There were two unrelated branches of Martinovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M635]

Mashkin
firstnameМашкин, Машков. This matronymic surname, sometimes also written as Mashkov, is derived from Mashka, a diminutive form of the women’s name Maria. The Mashkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M225]

Maslov
nicknameМаслов. This surname originates from the term maslo, meaning “butter” or “oil”. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Masloff, Masslow, Maslow, Maslove.  [Soundex Code M241]

Matrosov
occupationalМатросов. This surname is derived from the term matros, meaning “sailor”, a member of a ship’s crew or a serviceman in the navy. The Matrosovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Matrosoff, Matrosow, Matrosove.  [Soundex Code M362]

Matveev
firstnameМатвеев. Matveev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Matvei. The Matveevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M311]

Matveyenko
firstnameМатвеенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Matvei. A Matveyenko family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Lebedev family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Matvenko, Matveenko.  [Soundex Code M315]

Medvedev
nicknameМедведев. This surname originates from the term medved, meaning “bear”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bear, perhaps a great, awkward, hulking, powerful individual. There were two unrelated branches of Medvedevs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Ekaterinoslav and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Medvedeyeff, Medvedeff, Medvedoff, Medvedove, Medwedeff. [Soundex Code M313]

Men’shagin
nicknameМеньшагин. This surname originates from the dialect term men’shaga, meaning “younger son” or “younger brother”. This term may have been given to the youngest male child in a family. The Men’shagins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M522]

Menshov
nicknameМеншов. This surname originates from the term menshoi, meaning “youngest”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the youngest child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Menyakin
nicknameМенякин. This patronymic surname is derived from the verb menyat’sya, meaning “to change” or “to exchange”. Menyaka was the term given to someone who was an “exchanger”, “barterer” or “swapper” by nature. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M525]

Merekin
nicknameМерекин. This surname is derived from the dialect verb merekat’  meaning “to guess” or “to comprehend”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from merek, the name of the malicious fairytale spirit that dirties and spoils things. The Merekins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Merkulov
firstnameМеркулов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Merkul. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M624]

Mezentsev
locationalМезенцев. This surname originates from Mezenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the shores of the Mezen River which flows into the White Sea. It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Mezen in Old Russia. The Mezentsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M253]

Mikhailov
firstnameМихаилов. Mikhailov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men’s name Mikhailo. The Mikhailovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Mikhin
firstnameМихин. This patronymic surname is derived from Mikha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mikhailo. The Mikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M250]

Mikin
firstnameМикин. Mikin is derived from Mika, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mikhailo. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Mitin family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Meekin, Meakin, Meaken.  [Soundex Code M250]

Mikishin
firstnameМикишин. Mikishin is derived from Mikisha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Nikita or Nikifor. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code M225]

Mikitin
firstnameМикитин. Mikitin is derived from Mikita, a variant form of the men’s name Nikita. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Markin family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code M235]

Mikolenkov
firstnameМиколенков. Among the Doukhobors, this surname is derived from from Mikolenka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Nikolai, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Mikolenko, derived from the men’s name Nikolai.  [Soundex Code M245]

Mikulin
firstnameМикулин. This patronymic surname is derived from Mikula, a diminutive form of the men’s name Nikolai. The Mikulins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M245]

Milovanov
nicknameМилованов. This surname originates from milovan, the dialect term for a “merciful”, “forgiving” or “loving” person.  The Milovanovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M415]

Minakov
firstnameМинаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Minak, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mina. A Minakov family, originally of Molokan ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Russia in the early 20th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Mironov
firstnameМиронов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Miron. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Miroshnikov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. [Soundex Code M651]

Miroshin
firstnameМирошин. This patronymic surname is derived from Mirosha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Miron. The Miroshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Poltava, Russia in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Miroshnikov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Miroshnikov
occupationalМирошников. This surnameoriginates from the Ukrainian term miroshnik, meaning “miller” – someone who owned or operated a mill for grinding grain into flour or meal. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Miroshin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Meroshnekoff, Meroshnikoff, Miroshnikow, Mirosnikov, Miroshnikoff, Miroshnikove.  [Soundex Code M625]

Mishikov
firstnameМишиков. Mishikov is derived from Mishik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mikhail. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gubanov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code M221]

Mitin
firstnameМитин. This patronymic surname is derived from Mitya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Dmitry. The original Mitins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. Note that Mitin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. lEnglish spelling variants include: Miten, Mytyn, Mytin, Meetin.  [Soundex Code M350]

Mitrov
firstnameМитров. Mitrov is derived from Mitro, a diminutive form of the men’s name Dmitry. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code M361]

Mizginov
nicknameМизгинов. This surname originates from the dialect verb mizgat’ meaning “to cry”, “to whine” or “to weep”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb mizgatisya, meaning “to woo”, “to court” or “to make love”. The Mizginovs among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Mochalov
nicknameМочалов. This surname originates from the term mochalo, meaning “bast”. Peasants in Old Russia used bast – the inner bark of certain trees – for making rope, matting, netting, etc. The Mochalovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Kavkaz (Caucasus)  in the 18th century, resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M241]

Mokronosov
nicknameМокроносов. This surname derives from the term mokrii (“wet”) + nos (“nose”) or “wet-nosed”. This nickname may have been given to a child with a cold or running nose. A Mokronosov family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Perm, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Salykin family. The name was later shortened to Mokronov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makronosoff, Mokronosoff, Makronoff, Mokronoff, Mokronosove.  [Soundex Code M265]

Molchanov
nicknameМолчанов. This surname originates from the term molchan, meaning a “silent”, “taciturn” or “reserved” individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M425]

Mordovin
locationalМордовин. This surname originates from the term mordva, and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. The Mordovins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Morgunov
nicknameМоргунов. This surname originates from the verb morgat’ meaning “to wink”. Morgun was the nickname given to someone who winks. The Morgunovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M625]

Morozov
nicknameМорозов. Morozov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term moroz, meaning “frost” or “cold”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Morosoff, Morozoff, Marozoff, Moroso, Moraso, Morozow, Morosow, Morosof, Morsoff, Morozove. [Soundex Code M621]

Mudrov
nicknameМудров. This surname originates from the term mudrii, meaning “wise”, “sage”, “intelligent”, “prudent” and “clever”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M361]

Mukovnin
nicknameМуковнин (Муковников). This surname originates from the dialect term makovna, meaning “poppy seed”. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Mukovnikov, from the dialect term makovnik, meaning “poppy seed cake”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M215]

Mzhachev
nicknameМжачев. This surname originates from the dialect verb mzhat’, meaning “to doze”, “to be sleepy” or “to be somnolent”.  The term mzhach may have been given as a nickname to someone who exhibited this characteristic. The Mzhachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M221]

Mzhel’sky
locationalМжельский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the princely estate of Mzhel’sk in Old Russia, so called from the men’s name Muzhilo. The original Mzhelskys among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. According to tradition, the name was later adopted by a member of the Makeev family after the original male line of the Mzhelskys became extinct. Therefor the present day Mzhelskys among the Doukhobors are actually a branch of the Makeevs. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mojelsky, Mojelski, Mujelsky, Moojalsky, Moojelsky, Mzhelski, Mzhelskii, Mzhelskiy, Mzhelskij, Muzhilsky, Muzhilski, Muzhilskii, Muzhilskij, Muzhilskiy, Mojelskoff, Moojelskoff.  [Soundex Code M242]

– N –

Nadein
firstnameНадеин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Nadei. The Nadeins among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nadane, Nadain.  [Soundex Code N350]

Nagornov
locationalНагорнов (Нагорний). Among the Doukhobors, Nagornov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Nagorny. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term na (“up” or “on”) + gor (“mountain”) and refers to a “highlander” or “hill-dweller”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nagornoy, Nagornoff, Nahornoff, Nagornow, Nahornow, Nahornov, Nahornove. [Soundex Code N265]

Naidenov
nicknameНайденов. This surname originates from the term naidenishei, meaning “foundling”. The Naidenovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N351]

Narezhny
nicknameНарежний. This Ukrainian surname originates from the Ukrainian term narezhny, meaning “corner”.  This term may have been given as a nickname, in the figurative sense, to someone important or significant, or in the literal sense to someone who lived on a corner (either a road corner or corner of land).  It is also suggested that this name may derive form the verb narezat‘meaning “to cut” or “to apportion”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N625]

Nazarov
firstnameНазаров. Nazarov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Nazar. There were two unrelated branches of Nazarovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nazaroff, Nasaroff, Nazarow, Nazarove, Nazar.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nechvolodov
firstnameНечволодов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Nechvolod. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nechevolodoff, Nichvolodoff, Nichwolodoff, Nechvalodoff, Nichvalodoff, Nechwalodoff, Nichvolodov, Nichevalodoff, Nicholodoff, Nechivalodoff, Nitchvolodoff, Nechvolodoff, Nichevolodoff, Nichvolodow, Nichvoldow, Nechvolodove.  [Soundex Code N214]

Nefedov
firstnameНефедов. This patronymic surname is derived from Nefed, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mefodii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N131]

Negreev
nicknameНегреев. This surname originates from the term ne (“not”) + the verb gret’ (“to warm”) meaning “one who does not give out warmth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold. The Negreevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Negraeff, Negrave, Negrieff, Negreff, Negraff, Negreiff, Negreeff, Negreoff, Negreyev, Nigreoff, Nehraeff, Nechreiff, Negraiff, Negreyeff.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nemanikhin
nicknameНеманихин. Nemanikhin is a rare surname in Russia. It originates from the term ne (“not”) + manikha (“tempter” or “deceiver”) meaning “one who does not deceive”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest, straightforward, upright, trustworthy person. The Nemanikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kursk, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nemanikin, Nimanikin, Nemanicken, Niminikin, Nemonechen, Nimonichin, Nimanichan, Neimanichon, Nimanichin, Nymanychyn, Nemanishen, Nemanikhen, Niminiken, Neimanikhen, Nemaniken, Nemanischen, Nemaneshen, Neimanikhen.  [Soundex Code N552]

Nemakhov
nicknameНемахов. This surname is derived from the term nemak, meaning “mute”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term nemaka, meaning “little” or “few”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N521]

Neronov
firstnameНеронов. This patronymic surname is derived from Neron, a diminutive form of the men’s name Miron. The Neronovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N651]

Nestorov
firstnameНесторов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Nester. A Nestorov family, originally of Baptist ancestry from the province of Kiev, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Konkin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nesteroff, Nestiroff.  [Soundex Code N236]

Nikiforov
firstnameНикифоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Nikifor. The Nikiforovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K216]

Nikishev
firstnameНикишев. This surname originates from Nikisha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Nikita or Nikifor. The Nikishevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M221]

Nikitin
firstnameНикитин. This surname originates from the men’s name Nikita. There were two unrelated branches of Nikitins among the Doukhobors that originated from the Tambov-Penza region and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. Note that Nikitin also occurred independently in the 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a Doukhobor family from Tiflis province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified. [Soundex Code N235]

Nikolenkov
firstnameНиколенков. Among the Doukhobors, this surname is derived from from Nikolenka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Nikolai, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernov family in Tiflis and Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Nikolenko, derived from the men’s name Nikolai.  [Soundex Code N245]

Nosov
nicknameНосов, Носков. This surname, sometimes also written as Noskov, originates from the term nos, meaning “nose”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a large or prominent nose. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N210]

Novikov
nicknameНовиков. Novikov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term novii, meaning “new”. This term may have been given as a nickname to any amateur or newcomer. It is also suggested that the name can derive from novik, a term given to young soldiers and recruits meaning “novice”. Note that Novikov occurred among the Doukhobors as an official surname, and independently, as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century. [Soundex Code N121]

Novokshonov
nicknameНовокшонов. This surname originates from the term novokreschony, meaning “newly-baptised” or “newly-converted”. This nickname was given to those who accepted the Russian Orthodox faith, especially non-Christians and non-Russians such as Turks, Tatars, Mordvins, etc. From the 16th to 18th century, novokreschony in Russia were granted special incentives and privileges for converting, such as tax and military service exemptions, which distinguished them from the ordinary peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Novokshonoff, Nevokshoneff, Nevokshonoff, Nevacshonoff, Novokshoneff, Novakshonoff, Nevakshonoff, Novoshonoff, Nowakshanoff, Niwakshonoff, Navakshonoff, Novokshonow, Novokshonove, Nevok.  [Soundex Code N125]

Novosadov
locationalНовосадов. This surname is derived from the term novo (“new”) + sad (“garden”) and may refer to someone who planted or lived near a new garden. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N123]

Novosil’tsev
locationalНовосильцев. This surname originates from the term novoselets, meaning “new settler” and refers to a newcomer to a locality. The Novosil’tsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N124]

Nozhkin
nicknameНожкин. This surname originates from the term nozhki, meaning “small feet” or “small legs”, and was given to someone who matched this physical description. A Nozhkin family, originally of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Chernenkov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Noshkin. [Soundex Code N225]

– O –

Obedkov
nicknameОбедков. This surname is derived from the term obedki, meaning “meal leftovers” or “scraps”. The Obedkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abetkoff, Obiatkoff, Obiedkoff, Obietkoff, Obedkoff, Abietkoff, Obetkoff, Obetkow, Abedkoff, Obetkov, Obet’kov, Obetkove, Abetkove.  [Soundex Code O132; A132]

Obolentsev
locationalОболенцев. This surname originates from Obolenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the Russian city of Obolensk on the Oka river. The Obolentsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O145]

Okovantsev
nicknameОкованцев. This surname originates from the term okovanets, meaning “one who is fettered” or “one who is shackled’. The term may have been given as a nickname to a prisoner. The Okovantsevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O215]

Ordikov
firstnameОрдиков. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Ordik. The Ordikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O632]

Orekhov
nicknameОрехов. This surname originates from the term orekh, meaning “nut”. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Orekha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Arefy. The Orekhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Moskov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code O621]

Osipov
firstnameОсипов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Osip. The Osipovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O211]

Oslopov
nicknameОслопов. This surname originates from the term oslop, a large bludgeon or cudgel with iron spikes. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this weapon, or perhaps a hard, forceful individual. The Oslopovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O241]

Ostrikov
nicknameОстриков. This surname originates from the term ostrik, meaning “sharp”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a sharp or witty person. The Ostrikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ostrikoff, Ostrekoff, Ostrikow, Ostrikove.  [Soundex Code O236]

Ovchinnikov
occupationalОвчинников. This surname originates from the term ovchinnik, which refers to a furrier who manufactured sheepskin (ovchina) for garments and accessories. The Ovchinnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O125]

Ozerov
locationalОзеров. This surname originates from the term ozer, meaning “lake” and refers to someone who lived near a lake. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ozeroff, Ozoroff, Azeroff, Oseroff, Ozerow, Ozerove.  [Soundex Code O261]

– P –

Panferkov
firstnameПанферков. Panferkov is derived from Panferka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Parfenkov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panferov
firstnameПанферов. Panferov is derived from Panfer, a diminutive form of the men’s name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Antyufeev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panin
firstnameПанин. This patronymic surname is derived from Panya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Pavel, Panteleimon and Polien. There were three unrelated branches of Panins among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Tambov, Voronezh and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P550]

Pankov
firstnameПанков. This patronymic surname is derived from Panko, a diminutive form of the men’s name Pavel. The Pankovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pankoff, Pankow, Panko, Pankove.  [Soundex Code P521]

Panov
firstnameПанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Panya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Pavel, Panteleimon and Polien. The Panovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P510]

Pankratov
firstnameПанкратов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Pankrat. The Pankratovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P526]

Parakhin
firstnameПарахин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parakha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Paramon. The Parakhins among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Paraheen, Parkin, Parakin, Parahin.  [Soundex Code P625]

Paramonov
firstnameПарамонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Paramon. The Paramonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P655]

Parazikhin
nicknameПаразихин. This surname originates from the verb porazit’ meaning “to astonish”. Porazikha was the nickname given to “one who astonishes”. The Parazikhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P622]

Parfenkov
firstnameПарфенков (Парфёнов). Among the Doukhobor, this name was originally Parfenov. The “k” was addedin the first half of the 19th century. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Parfen. The Parfenkovs (Parfenovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Parfenko, which is derived from the men’s name Parfen. lEnglish spelling variants include: Parfenov, Parfionov, Parfyonov, Parfionkov, Parfyonkov, Parfenkoff, Parfenkow, Parfenkove.  [Soundex Code P615]

Parkin
firstnameПаркин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Paramon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Paraheen, Parkin, Parakin, Parahin.  [Soundex Code P625]

Parshin
firstnameПаршин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parsha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Parfen. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Pasynkov
nicknameПасынков. This surname originates from the term pasynok, meaning “step-son” or “foundling”.  This term would have been given as a nickname to the son of one’s husband or wife by a former spouse. The Pasynkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P252]

Pavlov
firstnameПавлов. Pavlov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from Pavlo, a diminutive form of the men’s name Pavel. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P141]

Pechersky
locationalПечерский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the shores of the Pechora River which flows into the Arctic Ocean in northern Russia. It may also refer to an ancestor who originated from the city of Pechery in Pskov province, Russia. The Pecherskys among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P262]

Pentsov
firstnameПенцов. This patronymic surname is derived from Penets, a diminutive form of the men’s names Peon and Feopent and perhaps Pavel, Pamfil, Pankrat, Pantelii and Parfenii.  The Pentsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P532]

Pepin
firstnameПепин. This patronymic surname is derived from Pepa, a diminutive form of the men’s name Petr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term pepa, meaning “simpleton”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Peipin, Pepen, Pipin, Pypin.  [Soundex Code P150]

Peregudov
nicknameПерегудов. This surname originates from the term peregud, meaning a “strong or vociferous shout”. The Peregudovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Perehudoff, Perehoodoff, Peregudoff, Peregoodoff, Peregudow, Perehudow, Perechudoff, Perehudov, Perehudove[Soundex Code P623; P631]

Perevalov
nicknameПеревалов. This surname originates from the term pereval, meaning a “mountain pass”. Note that this term also referred to a “waddler”, a “thief”, a “cloudburst”, “dragging across” and a “passage” in various dialects. The Perevalovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Russian province of Irkutsk in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.[Soundex Code P614]

Perepelkin
nicknameПерепелкин. This surname originates from the term perepel, meaning “quail”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a hunter or keeper of quails, or perhaps an amourous or timid individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Perepelkin, Perepalkin, Perapolkin, Perepiolkin.  [Soundex Code P614]

Pereverzev
nicknameПереверзев. This surname originates from the verb pereverziti, meaning “to muddle” or “to distort” in saying. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who turned every saying around so as to give it a distorted meaning. The Pereverzevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pereverseff, Pereversoff, Perverziff, Pereverzoff, Pereverzew, Perverseff, Periversoff, Perversoff, Perewersiv, Perewerziv, Perewersif, Perewerziff, Pereverzeff, Persoff.  [Soundex Code P616]

Perov
nicknameПеров. This surname originates from the term pero, meaning “feather”. Note that this term also referred to a “fin” (of a fish) and a “blade” (of an oar). The Perovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P610]

Petrenko
firstnameПетренко. This surname is properly Petrov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.  [Soundex Code B365]

Petrov
firstnameПетров. Petrov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Petr. The Petrovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Tambov region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petroff, Petrow.  [Soundex Code P361]

Pichugin
nicknameПичугин. This surname originates from the term pichuga, meaning “small bird” or “birdie”. This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. The Pichugins among the Doukhobors originated from the Azov region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P225]

Pimenov
firstnameПименов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Pimen. The Pimenovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Plaksin
nicknameПлаксин. This surname originates from the term plaksa, meaning “crier”, “whiner” or “weeper”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Plaxin, Plaxen, Plaskin, Ploxin.  [Soundex Code P425]

Plastun
occupationalПластун. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the plastun, the term for a special Cossack infantryman, a foot scout who moved on all fours, flat and low, on his stomach. The Plastuns among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P423]

Planidin
nicknameПланидин (Планида). Among the Doukhobors, Planidin is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Planida. The -in suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the Ukrainian term planida, meaning one’s “fate” or “destiny”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Planedin, Planiden, Plonidin, Planedyin, Planaden, Planydyn, Planden, Planida.  [Soundex Code P453]

Plokhov
nicknameПлохов (Плохий). Among the Doukhobors, Plokhov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Plokhiy. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the term plokha, meaning “badly” or “poorly”. The Plokhovs (Plokhiys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P421]

Plotnikov
occupationalПлотников. This surname originates from the term plotnik, meaning “carpenter”, a craftsman whose work was building with wood. The Plotnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the seventeenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Plotnikoff, Plotnicove, Plotniko, Plotnikow, Platnikoff, Plotnikove.  [Soundex Code P435]

Pobirokhin
occupationalПобирохин. Pobirokhin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It is derived from the Old Russian term pobirukha, meaning “beggar”. Note that this surname was borne by Ilarion Pobirokhin, leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia from 1765-1790. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P162]

Podkolozov
locationalПодколозов (Подколзин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Podkol’zin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term pod (“under”) + kolozen‘ (“log”), meaning one who abides under a log. This nickname was given to a traitorous or malicious individual. The Podkolozovs (Podkolzins) among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P324]

Podkovalnikov
occupationalПодковалников. This surname originates from the verb podkovat’, meaning “to shoe a horse”. Podkovalnik was the name given to someone who shoed horses. The Podkovalnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P321]

Podomarev
occupationalПодомарев. Podomarev is derived from podomar, a variation of the term ponomar meaning “sexton”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ponomarev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podmoroff, Pudmoroff, Podmarow, Padmoroff, Podmaroff, Podmerow, Podmeroff, Podmoreoff, Pudmaroff, Padmeroff, Podmorow, Pudmoreff, Podmorrow, Podmore, Podmarove.  [Soundex Code P356]

Podovinnikov
locationalПодовинников, Подовильников. This surname, also written as Podovil’nikov, is derived from the term pod (“under”) + ovin (“threshing barn”). Podovinnik was the term for the fire pit in the lower floor of a peasant’s threshing barn, used for drying the sheaves before threshing. Podovinnik was also the name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit that place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podovinikoff, Podovinnikoff, Podovinnikof, Padowinikoff, Podovennikoff, Podovelnikoff, Podavinikoff, Podovilnikoff, Podavinnikow, Podevilnikoff, Podowilnikoff, Podovinnekov, Padavelnecoff, Podovinnikove, Padavell, Podovin, Podavin, Podawin, Podwin, Podov.  [Soundex Code P315]

Podovsky
locationalПодовский. This name is properly Podovinnikov. It originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Podovinnikov family in Tiflis and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Padowsky, Podowsky, Padowski, Padowskii, Podovski, Podovskii, Podovskij, Podovskiy, Podowski, Podosky, Podowisky.  [Soundex Code P312; P320]

Pogozhev
nicknameПогожев, Погожин (Погожий). This surname, sometimes also written as Pogozhin, is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Pogozhy. The -ov or -in suffix endings were added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term pogozhii, meaning “serene”, “fresh” or “pure”. The Pogozhevs (Pogozhys) among the Doukhobors originated from Kavkaz (Caucasus) province, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pohozeff, Pohozoff, Pohozhev, Pogozhii, Pogozhiy.  [Soundex Code P221]

Poletaev
nicknameПолетаев. This surname originates from the dialect verb poletai, meaning to do something “flying”, “fast” or “quick”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. The Poletaevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P431]

Polikarpov
firstnameПоликарпов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Polikarp. The Polikarpovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P426]

Poluektov
firstnameПолуектов. This surname is derived from Poluekt, a diminutive form of the men’s name Polievkt. The Pouektovs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P423]

Polovnikov
occupationalПоловников. This surname originates from the term polovnik, meaning “sharecropper”. The polovniki were a class of free, unindentured peasants who agreed to farm and remain on the land of a feudal lord or nobleman for a set number of years, and to pay a share of their crop to the landlord as rental. Note that this term also referred to a “ladle”. The Polovnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Polovnikoff, Polonikoff, Polonicoff, Polovnicoff, Polonikow, Polovnikove.  [Soundex Code P415; P452]

Poltinov
nicknameПолтинов. Poltinov is derived from the term poltina, meaning “half a rouble”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code P435]

Polyakov
locationalПоляков. Polyakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term polyak, meaning “Pole” and indicates an ancestor who originated from Poland. There were two unrelated branches of Polyakovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tavria (Tauride) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P421]

Ponomarev
occupationalПономарев. Ponomarev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term ponomar, meaning “sexton”, an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. The Ponomarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ponamaroff, Ponomarow, Ponomarov, Ponamoroff, Panamaroff, Ponomaroff, Ponomareff, Ponomarove, Ponomariov, Ponomaryov.  [Soundex Code P556]

Popov
occupationalПопов. Popov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term pop, a Russian Orthodox “priest”. There were several unrelated branches of Popovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Tambov, Ekaterinoslav, Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Kherson and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Popoff, Popove, Papove, Papov, Papoff, Popow, Papoe.  [Soundex Code P110]

Postnikov
nicknameПостников (Посников). This surname was originally written as Posnikov and is derived from the term posnik (or postnik), meaning “one who fasts”. This nickname refers to the Russian Orthodox ritual of abstaining from certain foods during fast-days and other religious holidays. It may have been given to a particularly pious and zealous worshipper. The Postnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the fifth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Posnekoff, Posnikoff, Postnikoff, Postnekoff, Posnikow, Pasnekoff, Posnicoff, Postnikow, Posniakoff, Pastnikoff, Postnickoff, Pasnikoff, Posnikov, Postnikove.  [Soundex Code P235]

Potapov
firstnameПотапов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Potap. The Potapovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Potapoff, Potopoff, Potapow, Potopov.  [Soundex Code P311]

Povalyaev
nicknameПоваляев. This surname originates from the dialect verb povalyati, meaning “to throw down”, “to tumble” or “to roll about”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P141]

Pozdnyakov
nicknameПоздняков (Позняков). This surname was originally written as Poznyakov and is derived from the term poznii (or pozdnii), meaning “late”. Pozdnyak was the name given to a child born past the expected date or a child born to older parents. There were two unrelated branches of Pozdniakovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pozdnikoff, Poznekoff, Poznikoff, Poznoff, Pozney, Pozdniakoff, Pozdniakow, Paznekoff, Pozdnekoff, Poznyakov, Pozdnyakov, Poznikow, Poznicov, Poznecov, Pozniakov, Pozdnikove.  [Soundex Code P235]

Prokofiev
firstnameПрокофиев. This patronymic surname is derived from Prokofy, a diminutive form of the men’s name Prokopy. The Prokofievs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P621]

Prokopenko
firstnameПрокопенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Prokopy. A Prokopenko family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors in the late 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Prokopenkoff.  [Soundex Code P621]

Prokudin
nicknameПрокудин. This surname originates from the dialect term prokuda, meaning a “prank”, “tomfoolery”, “joke” or “naughtiness”. The Prokudins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P623]

Prudnisky
locationalПрудниский. Prudnisky is derived from the dialect term prudnii, meaning “pond”, “dam” or “embankment” and refers to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutskov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code P635]

Pryamorukov
nicknameПряморуков. Pryamorukov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term pryama (“straight” or “direct”) + ruka (“hand” or “arm”), meaning “straight-handed”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a frank, honest, direct, straightforward person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pramarukoff, Premarukoff, Primorookoff, Pramorukoff, Priamorukov, Premaruko, Primerukoff, Primarukoff, Premerokoff, Pramarukove.  [Soundex Code P656]

Pudov
firstnameПудов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Pud. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term pud, a unit of measure used in Old Russia. The Pudovs among the Doukhobors originated from Amur province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P310]

Pudovkin
nicknameПудовкин. This surname is derived from the pudovka, the term for a measure of volume of grain or other bulk materials. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose collected duties and measured weights, the maker of barrels and kegs used to carry this volume of material, or perhaps a short, stout and stocky individual. The Pudovkins among the Doukhobors originated from Voronezh province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P312]

Pugachev
nicknameПугачев. This surname originates from the term pugach, meaning “owl”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an owl, perhaps a wise, alert or keen-sighted individual. Note that this term was also given to someone “who frightens”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Poogacheff, Poogachoff, Pugachoff, Poohachow, Poohochoff, Poohachoff, Poogochoff, Pugacheff, Poogocheff, Pogocheff, Puhacheff, Puhachoff, Pugachov, Puhachov, Puhachev, Pugachiov, Pugachyov, Pugachove.  [Soundex Code P221; P210]

Pugin
nicknameПугин. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term puga, a type of whip or strap attached to a pole used to prod livestock. This term may have been used as nickname for someone who made or used this implement, or perhaps a “scary” or “intimidating” individual. Note that in some Russian dialects, this term also referred to an “egg”, “heel”, “dead-end” or “pillow”. The Pugins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P250]

Pusov
firstnameПусов. Pusov is derived from Pusya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Pavel. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Bludov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code P210]

Putilin
firstnameПутилин. This patronymic surname is derived from Putilo, a diminutive form of the men’s name Putislav. The Putilins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P345]

Pykhtin
locationalПыхтин. This surname originates from the term pykhta, meaning “silver fir” tree, and may refer to someone who lived near a fir tree or grove. The Pykhtins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pictin, Picton, Picten, Peichtin, Pectin, Pikhtin.  [Soundex Code P235]

– R –

Rakitin
nicknameРакитин. This surname originates from the term rakita, meaning “brittle willow”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Rakitins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tula, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R235]

Rasskazov
nicknameРассказов. This surname originates from the term rasskaz, meaning “tale” or “story”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a talented narrator or story-teller, or perhaps an individual prone to exaggeration. The Rasskazovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

Razinkin
firstnameРазинкин, Разинков. This surname, sometimes also written as Razinkov, is derived from Razenka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Razumnik and Erazm. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term razinya, meaning “scatter-brain”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rozinkin. [Soundex Code R252]

Remezov
nicknameРемезов (Ремезь). Among the Doukhobors, Remezov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Remez’. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It originates from the term remez, meaning “tomtit” or “wren”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an wren, perhaps an industrious, talkative or singing individual. The Remezovs (Remezs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Remezoff, Remizove, Reimizoff, Rymizoff, Remizoff, Remesoff, Remisove, Remisoff, Ramsoff, Ramazoff, Remizove, Remizon.  [Soundex Code R521]

Repin
nicknameРепин. This surname originates from the term repa, meaning “turnip”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Repins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rapin, Rypin, Ripin.  [Soundex Code R150]

Reshetnikov
occupationalРешетников. This surname originates from the term reshetnik, meaning “sieve-maker”. The Reshetnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R235]

Rezantsev
locationalРезанцев. This surname is derived from Riazanets, the term for an inhabitant of Riazan province, south-east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from rezanets, the nickname given to a man cut or wounded in a fight. In 1970 it was found to be the fourteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rezanseff, Rezansoff, Rizansoff, Rezantsoff, Rezansow, Rezanoff, Rezanov, Rezanuoff, Riezanuoff, Rouzanuoff, Rezanson.  [Soundex Code R253; R252]

Reznikov
occupationalРезников. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term reznik, meaning “butcher”, someone whose job was to kill animals for meat and prepare meat for sale. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for butcher – myasnik) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R252]

Rodionov
firstnameРодионов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Rodion. The Rodionovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R351]

Roldugin
nicknameРолдугин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term rolduga, meaning “manufactured deer skin” or “buckskin”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a tanner or perhaps a maker or wearer of deer skin garments and footwear.  The Roldugins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R432]

Romanov
firstnameРоманов. Romanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Roman. The Romanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R551]

Rozhnov
nicknameРожнов. This surname originates from the dialect term rozhon, meaning a “sharp stake” used as a weapon.  Note that this term also referred to an “aggressive”, “obstinate” or “dangerous” person. The Rozhnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Rudenko
nicknameРуденко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term ruda, meaning “ochre-colored”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. The Rudenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria (Tauride), Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R352]

Rudnev
nicknameРуднев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term rudnyi, meaning “ochre-colored”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. The Rudnevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R351]

Rybalkin
occupationalРыбалкин. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term rybalka, meaning “fisherman”, someone whose occupation was catching fish. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for fisherman – rybaka) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ribalkin, Rebalkin, Reebalkin, Reibalkin, Riebalkin, Ribalken, Balkan.  [Soundex Code R142]

Rybin
nicknameРыбин (Рыбан). Among the Doukhobors, Rybin is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Ryban. The -in suffix ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term ryba, meaning “fish”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a fisherman, fish seller or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fish, perhaps a good swimmer. The Rybins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ryban, Reibin, Reiben, Rebin, Reban, Riben, Reeben, Reabbin, Riebin, Ribin.  [Soundex Code R150]

Rybkin
nicknameРыбкин. This surname originates from rybka, a diminutive form of the term ryba (“fish”) meaning “little fish”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a fisherman, fish seller or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fish, perhaps a good swimmer. The Rybkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R125]

Rykunov
nicknameРыкунов. This surname originates from the term ryk, meaning “growl”. Rykun was the name given to someone who growled. The Rykunovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kiev, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Ryl’kov
nicknameРыльков, Рылькин. This surname, sometimes also written as Ryl’kin,  originates from the term rylo, meaning “face”, “mug”, “muzzle” or “snout”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent face, mouth or nose. There were two unrelated branches of Ryl’kovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tavria (Tauride) and Tambov in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rilkoff, Reilkoff, Rielkoff, Relkov, Rilcof, Relkow, Relkoff, Rilcoff, Rilkov, Rilkow, Rilkove.  [Soundex Code R421]

Ryzhkov
nicknameРыжков. This surname originates from the term ryzhko, meaning “red”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

– S –

Saburyaev
nicknameСабуряев. This is a Russianized Turkic surname derived from the term Sabur, meaning “The Patient” – one of the Turkic names of God. Surnames of this type were frequently borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. The Saburyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. According to tradition, members of this family adopted the new surname Solovyov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S161]

Sadkov
firstnameСадков. This patronymic surname is derived from Sadko, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sadok. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term saduk, meaning “upright”, “honest”, “forward” and “sincere”. The Sadkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sadkoff, Satkoff, Sutkoff.  [Soundex Code S321]

Salamatin
nicknameСаламатин. This surname originates from the term salamata, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Salamatins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S453]

Salychev
firstnameСалычев. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Salych. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S421]

Salykin
firstnameСалыкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Salyk, a diminutive form of the men’s names Selivan and Salaman. The Salikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Salikin, Salekin, Salikene, Saleken, Salukin, Saliken, Salikan.  [Soundex Code S425]

Samoilov
firstnameСамойлов. This patronymic surname is derived from Samoilo, a diminutive form of the men’s name Samuil. The Samoilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samoyloff, Samoylow, Samoiloff, Samoylov, Samoylove, Somoyloff, Samoilove.  [Soundex Code S541]

Samorodin
nicknameСамородин. Samorodin is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term samo (“one’s self”) + rodinii (“to deliver or give birth”) meaning “one who gives birth to one’s self”. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Tolmachev family in recognition of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, the surname is commonly derived from the term smorodina, meaning “red currant” or “currant bush”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Smorodin, Smoroden, Simorodin, Samorodine, Samerodin, Semorodin, Samiroden, Samirodin, Samaroden, Samarodin.  [Soundex Code S563]

Samsonov
firstnameСамсонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Samson. There were several unrelated branches of Samsonovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov, Ekaterinoslav and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samsonoff, Samsenoff, Samsonow, Samsonove.  [Soundex Code S525]

Samylin
firstnameСамылин. This patronymic surname is derived from Samyl, a diminutive form of the men’s name Samuil. The Samylins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sanin
firstnameСанин. This patronymic surname is derived from Sana, a diminutive form of the men’s names Alexander and Disan. The Sanins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kherson, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S550]

Saplin
nicknameСаплин. This surname originates from the unflattering nickname sopli, meaning “snivel” or “snot”. The Saplins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S145]

Sapozhnikov
occupationalСапожников. This surname originates from the term sapozhnik, meaning “cobbler” or “shoemaker”. Note that this term also referred to a “hatter”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

Saprikin
firstnameСаприкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Saprika, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sofron. The Saprikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soprikin, Saprekin, Sapriken, Sapriekin, Suprican, Saprikan, Schaprickyn. [Soundex Code S162]

Sapunov
nicknameСапунов. This surname is derived from the verb sapet’ meaning to “snuffle”. Sapun was the nickname given to a sniffler, someone who breathed noisily due to a cold or congestion. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Sapun, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sapon or Sofon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sasikin
firstnameСасикин. This patronymic surname is derived from Sasik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sasonii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S225]

Savenkov
firstnameСавенков (Савенко). Among the Doukhobors, Savenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Savenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Sava. The Savenkovs (Savenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Savinkoff, Savenkoff, Sawenkoff, Saweinkoff, Savenkow, Savinkoff, Savynkoff, Savinoff, Savenkove.  [Soundex Code S152]

Savel’ev
firstnameСавильев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Savely. There were two original unrelated branches of Savel’evs among the Doukhobors that originated from Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) province and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century.  Note that Savel’ev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Strelyaev family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia as well as the Savenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia, in the mid-19th century, whose patriarchs bore this name.  [Soundex Code S141]

Savinov
firstnameСавинов. Savinov is derived from the men’s name Savin. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kozlachkov family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S151]

Savitsky
locationalСавицкий (Савицкков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Savitsy, Savichi or Savitskoye, so called from the men’s name Savva. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Savitskov by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Savitsky, Savitski, Savitskii, Savitskiy, Savitskij, Savitskoff, Sovitskoff, Soviskov, Saviskoff, Sowitzkoff, Sovietskoff, Savitzkoff, Savitskow, Savitskov, Savitskove.  [Soundex Code S132]

Sedov
nicknameСедов. This surname originates from the term sedoi, meaning “grey”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with grey hair, a grey beard or moustache or grey eyes. There were two unrelated branches of Sedovs among the Doukhobors that originated from Ekaterinoslav province and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S310]

Selivanov
firstnameСеливанов. Selivanov is derived from the men’s name Selivan. Among the Doukhobors, it originated in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for the descendants of Selivan Kolesnikov, leader of the Doukhobors in Ekaterinoslav province, Russia from 1740-1775. [Soundex Code S415]

Semenishchev
firstnameСеменищев. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenische, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. The Semenishchevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Semenishchev also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenov
firstnameСеменов. Semenov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Semyon. There were two unrelated branches of Semenovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Don Region in the 18th century and that resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. In 1970 it was found to be the twelfth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Semenoff, Simenoff, Seminoff, Siminoff, Simonoff, Semenow, Smanoff, Symenoff, Semenove.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semenyutin
firstnameСеменютин. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenyuta, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. The Semeniutins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S553]

Semin
firstnameСемин. Semin is derived from Syoma, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chutskov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code S551]

Sereda
nicknameСереда. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term sereda, meaning “Wednesday”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born on the fourth day of the week. A Sereda family, originally of Stundist ancestry from the province of Kharkov, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors in the early 20th century. [Soundex Code S 630]

Sergeev
firstnameСергеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sergei. The Sergeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Sergiev
firstnameСергиев. This patronymic surname is derived from Sergii, the Old Russian form of the men’s name Sergei. The Sergievs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Penza, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Shalaev
nicknameШалаев. This surname originates from the term shalyi, meaning “madcap”, “prankish” or “mischievous”. The Shalaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S410]

Shalimov
nicknameШалимов. This surname originates from the Turkic term shalym, meaning “handful”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a baby to emphasize its diminutiveness. The Shalimovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S541]

Shamrikov
nicknameШамриков. Shamrikov originates from the dialect verb shamriti, meaning “to lisp”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shustov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code S562]

Shamshurin
nicknameШамшурин. Shamshurin originates from the term shamshura, meaning someone with a “lisp” or “burr”. Note that this term also referred to a “lady’s headdress”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Shustov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century.  [Soundex Code S526]

Shapkin
nicknameШапкин. This surname originates from the term shapka, meaning “cap” or “headgear”. The Shapkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century.  [Soundex Code S125]

Sharov
nicknameШаров. This surname originates from the term shary, meaning “spheres”, “globes” or “balls”.  Note that this term also means “eyes” in some Russian dialects.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large or prominent eyes. The Sharovs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S610]

Shashurin
firstnameШашурин. This patronymic surname is derived from Shashura, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aleksandr. It is also suggested that the name may derive from the verb shashit‘ meaning “to tinker”, “to putter” or “to fuss”.  The Shashurins among the Doukhobors originated in Voronezh province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S265]

Shchegolev
nicknameЩеголев. This surname originates from the nickname shchegol, meaning “goldfinch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goldfinch, perhaps a gregarious, whistling or singing individual.  Note that this term also referred to a “foppish”, “elegant”, “dandy”, “smart” or “boastful” individual. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S224]

Shchekinov
nicknameЩекинов (Щекин). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Shchekin. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term shcheka, meaning “cheek”. The Shchekinovs (Shchekins) among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. A second unrelated Shchekin family of Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shchekinoff, Schekinoff, Shikonoff, Chikanoff, Shikinoff.  [Soundex Code S251; S225]

Shcherbakov
nicknameЩербаков. Shcherbakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term shcherbak, meaning “pock-marked” or “gap-toothed”. Note that this term also referred to a “userer”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Scherbakoff, Shcherbakoff, Scherbekoff, Sherbakoff, Sherbakow, Sherbakove, Sherbiko.  [Soundex Code S261; S612]

Shcherbinin
nicknameЩербинин. This surname originates from the term shcherbina meaning “chink”, “crevice”, “gap”, “notch”, scratch” or “scar”. The Shcherbinins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sherbinin, Scherbinin.  [Soundex Code S261; S615]

Shchirov
nicknameЩиров. This surname originates from the dialect term shchiryi, meaning a “straight line”. Note that this term also referred to a “frank” or “sincere” person. The Shchirovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S261]

Shchukin
nicknameЩукин. This surname originates from the term shchuka, meaning “pike” fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a pike. The Shchukins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shukin, Shuken, Shookin, Schoukin, Schookin, Schukin.  [Soundex Code S250]

Shenyakin
nicknameШенякин. This surname originates from shenyaka, a diminutive form of the dialect term shenya, meaning “colt” or “foal”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a colt, perhaps a frisky, sportive or skittish individual. The Shenyakins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Poltava, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Shestakov
nicknameШестаков. This surname originates from the term shestak, meaning “sixth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the sixth child in a family. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S232]

Sheyin
nicknameШеин. This surname is derived from the term sheya, meaning “neck”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent, stiff or sore neck. The Sheyins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S500]

Sherstobitov
occupationalШерстобитов. This surname is derived from the term sherst (“wool”) + the verb obit’ (“to beat”) and refers to a “fuller”, a textile worker at a wool-spinning mill who cleaned, scoured and shook wool with a special bow to prepare it for spinning. The Sherstobitovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sherstobitoff, Sherstobetoff, Sherstabitoff, Sherstobitow, Sherstibitoff, Sherstobetieff, Sherstebitoff, Sharstobitoff.  [Soundex Code S623]

Sheverdyaev
nicknameШевердяев. This surname derives from the dialect verb shevyryat’, meaning “to stir up”, “to pick” or “to rummage”. Sheverda was the nickname given to someone who stirs something up. The Sheverdyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

Shilov
nicknameШилов. This surname originates from the term shil, meaning “awl”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who worked with an awl, or perhaps someone who was said to be as “sharp” as an awl. The Shilovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shiloff, Sheloff, Shelloff, Shilow.  [Soundex Code S410]

Shishkin
nicknameШишкин. This surname is derived from the term shishka, meaning “bump”, “cone”, “swelling” or “knob”. Note that this term was also given to a “boss”, “bigshot” or “important” individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term shish ka, meaning “swelling” or “prominence”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shishken, Shiskin. [Soundex Code S225]

Shkadronov
nicknameШкадронов. This surname is derived from the dialect term shkadron, meaning horse “squadron” or “company”. Note that this term also meant “horse tack”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to horseman or to a maker of horse saddles, bridles and other tack.  Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S236]

Shkuratov
nicknameШкуратов. This surname originates from the term shkura, meaning “skin”, “hide” or “leather”. Shkurat was the term for a “rag” or “piece” of leather. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shkuratoff, Skuratow, Shkurotoff, Shkuratove, Shkooratoff, Skuratove, Skuratoff.  [Soundex Code S263; S631]

Shlyakhov
locationalШляхов. This surname originates from the dialect term shlyakh, meaning a “steppe road” leading to the southern borderlands of Russia and may refer to someone who lived near such a place, or perhaps a road inspector. The Shlyakhovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shlakoff, Shalakoff, Shlakow, Shlakove, Shliakhov.  [Soundex Code S421]

Shmagin
nicknameШмагин. This surname originates from the dialect verb shmagati, meaning “to whip” or “to lash”.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term shumaga, meaning “money”. The Shmagins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M525]

Shtepselev
nicknameШтепселев. This surname is derived from the term shtepsel’ meaning “plug”, “switch”, “cork” or “wedge”.  Note this term may also refer to any “man” or “husband”.  Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S312]

Shuchkin
nicknameШучкин. This surname derives from the dialect term shuchka, meaning “joke”, “jest” or “banter”. The Shuchkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S225]

Shul’gin
nicknameШульгин. This surname originates from the dialect term shul’ga, meaning “left-hander”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. The Shul’gins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S425]

Shumilin
nicknameШумилин. This surname originates from the nickname shumilo, meaning “shouter” or “noisy”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shumelin. [Soundex Code S545]

Shusherin
nicknameШушерин. This surname originates from the dialect term shushera, meaning “rubbish” or “refuse”. This term may have been given as a derogatory nickname or perhaps to a rubbish-collector.  The Shusherins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S265]

Shustov
nicknameШустов. This surname originates from the term shust, meaning “smart”, “vigilant” or “fussy”. Note that this term also referred to a “greedy eater” or “glutton” and to a “ramrod” used to clean the barrels of firearms. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shustoff, Shoustoff, Shustow, Shustove. [Soundex Code S231]

Shvedov
locationalШведов. This surname originates from the term shved, meaning “Swede” and indicates an ancestor who originated from Sweden. The Shvedovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S131]

Shvetsov
occupationalШвецов. Shvetsov is derived from the dialect term shvets, meaning “tailor” – someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Vyshlov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the late 19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members in Russia. [Soundex Code S132]

Sidorov
firstnameСидоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sidor. The Sidorovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S361]

Skachkov
nicknameСкачков. This surname originates from the term skachok, meaning “leap”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was a “leaper” or “jumper”. There were two unrelated branches of Skachkovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav and the Don region of Russia. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Skibov
nicknameСкибов (Скобейко). Among the Doukhobors, Skibov is a Russianization of the Belarusian surname Skobeiko. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It is derived from the Belarusian term skoba, meaning “clamp”, “brace”, “clasp”, “latch” or “staple”. The Skibov (Skobeiko) family, originally of Belarusian ancestry from Brest province, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Parfenkov family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Skiboff, Skobeiko, Skobeyko, Skobeykoff.  [Soundex Code S110]

Skoblikov
nicknameСкобликов. This surname originates from the dialect term skoblik, meaning “gudgeon” or “minnow”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb skoblit’ meaning “to scrape” (with a scraping-knife). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S142]

Skripnichenko
occupationalСкрипниченко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term skripnik, meaning “fiddle-player”. The Skripnichenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S615]

Skripnikov
occupationalСкрипников (Скрипник). Among the Doukhobors, Skripnikov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Skripnik. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It originates from the term skripnik, meaning “fiddle-player”. The Skripnikov (Skripnik) family, originally of non-Doukhobor ancestry from the province of Kiev, Russia, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada in the early 20th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Skripnikoff, Skripnekoff, Skrepnekoff, Skripnik, Skripnek, Skrepnek.  [Soundex Code S615]

Skvortsov
nicknameСкворцов. This surname originates from the term skvorets, meaning “starling”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a starling, perhaps a cheerful, whistling or singing individual. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S163]

Slastukhin
nicknameСластухин. This surname originates from the dialect term slastukha, meaning a sweet “dainty” or “pastry”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or ate this pastry, or perhaps as a term of endearment to a child or loved one.  The Slastukhins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slastookin, Slastuchin, Slastukin.  [Soundex Code S423]

Slepov
nicknameСлепов. Slepov is derived from the term slepoi, meaning “blind”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Antyufeev family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slepoff.  [Soundex Code S411]

Slobodin
locationalСлободин. This surname originates from sloboda, the term for a settlement of free peasants or cossacks in Old Russia, and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. Note that this term also means “free” or “freedom” in some dialects. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S413]

Smagin
nicknameСмагин. This surname originates from the term smaga, meaning “soot”, “pitch”, “heat”, “thirst”, “blackness”, “burnt”, “dark” and “swarthy” in various dialects. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description.  The Smagins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Smirnov
nicknameСмирнов. Smirnov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term smirnyi, meaning “timid”, “quiet” or “peaceful”. The Smirnovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S565]

Smolin
nicknameСмолин. This surname derives from the term smola, meaning “tar”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with black hair, or perhaps an annoying, constant person. The Smolins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sofonov
firstnameСофонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sofon. The Sofonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Safonov, Safonoff, Sofonoff. Sofonow, Safonove, Sophonoff, Saphanow, Sophonow.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sokolov
nicknameСоколов. This surname originates from the term sokol, meaning “falcon”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. There were two unrelated branches of Sokolovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the provinces of Moskov and Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S241]

Solov’ev
nicknameСоловьев. This surname originates from the term solovei, meaning “nightingale”. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Saburyaev family whose singing voice was beautiful like that of a nightingale. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soloveoff, Soloveow, Soloveyov, Solovov, Solovioff, Solovev, Soloviov, Solovyov, Solovyev, Solovave.  [Soundex Code S411]

Sopov
nicknameСопов. This surname originates from the verb sopiit’ meaning to “snore”, “snort” or “wheeze”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who breathed violently and noisily while awake or asleep. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Sopa, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sapon or Sofon. The Sopovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sopoff, Sopow, Supoff, Sopove.  [Soundex Code S110]

Sorokin
nicknameСорокин. This surname originates from the term soroka, meaning “magpie”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a magpie, perhaps a cunning, noisy or pilfering individual. The original Sorokins among the Doukhobors hailed from the province of Astrakhan, Russia in the 18th century. No members of this family immigrated to Canada. Sorokin was also the name of a controversial non-Doukhobor Ukrainian from Kharkov, Russia, Stefan Soroka (1902-1984) who Russianized his name to Sorokin and assumed leadership of the “Sons of Freedom” Doukhobors in the 1950’s.  [Soundex Code S625]

Sotnikov
occupationalСотников. This surname is derived from sotnik, the term for a Cossack “squadron commander”. The Sotnik was the officer in charge of a sotnia, a Cossack squadron of a hundred men. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sotnikoff, Sotnekoff, Sotnikow, Sotnikove.  [Soundex Code S352]

Stangvilov
nicknameСтангвилов (Стангвила). Among the Doukhobors, Stangvilov is a Russianization of the Lithuanian surname Stangvila. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It originates from the Lithuanian terms stang (“solid” or “resilient”) + vil (“to wish” or “to desire”). The Stangvilov (Stangvila) family, originally of non-Doukhobor ancestry, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Konkin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stangviloff, Stanviloff.  [Soundex Code S352]

Starchikov
nicknameСтарчиков. Starchikov is derived from the term starichok, meaning “elder” or “oldster”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Kars province, Russia in the late 19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code S362]

Starodubov
nicknameСтародубов. This surname originates from the term staryi (“old”) + dub (“oak”). The resulting nickname starodub, literally meaning “old oak”, referred to a “wise”, “honest”, “strong” or “steadfast” individual. The Starodubovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Starodubtsev
locationalСтародубцев. This surname is derived from Starodubets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Starodub, south-west of Moscow. The Starodubtsevs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Startsev
nicknameСтарцев. This surname originates from the term starets, meaning “old man” or “elder”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term staritsa, meaning “old woman” or “nun”. The Startsevs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Stepanov
firstnameСтепанов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Stepan. The Stepanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Storozhev
occupationalСторожев. This surname originates from the term storozh, meaning “guard”, “watchman”, “gaoler” or “porter”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Storjeff, Storgeoff, Storgoff, Starshiff, Starjeff, Starjiff, Storgeff, Sturgeoff, Storgow, Storeshaw, Storsheff, Storgove.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strelyaev
nicknameСтреляев. This surname originates from the verb strelyat’ meaning “to shoot” an arrow (strela). The Strelyaevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the ninth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Strelaeff, Strelieff, Strelioff, Streleff, Strelive, Strelieve, Strelove, Straloff, Striloff, Streleoff, Strilioff, Strelaioff, Streloff, Strelov, Strellioff, Strilaeff, Stroloff, Stralieff, Streliaoff, Strilieff, Strilaiff, Strilaeff, Strelaff, Strelow, Strelaev, Strelayev, Streliaev, Streliev, Strealieff, Strellaeff, Streliaff, Strelaeff, Strelayeff, Strilive, Streliaeff, Streleaff, Strelaif, Streliaiff, Streleiff, Strelleaff, Strelau, Strulow. [Soundex Code S364]

Strel’nikov
occupationalСтрельников. This surname originates from the term strelnik, meaning “archer”. The Strelnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code S364]

Stroev
nicknameСтроев. This surname originates from the term stroi, meaning “build”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a builder or perhaps a well-built individual. Note that this term also referred to a cripple or beggar. The Stroevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S361]

Stroganov
nicknameСтроганов. This surname originates from the term strogii, meaning “severe”, “strict” or “vigilant”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb strogat’ meaning “to plane” or “to shave”. The Stroganovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strukov
nicknameСтруков. This surname originates from the term struk, meaning “pod”, “conch” or “shell”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone small or undersized in stature. The Strukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Strukoff, Strookoff, Strukow, Strookow, Strukove.  [Soundex Code S362]

Stuchnov
nicknameСтучнов (Штучнов, Штучний). Among the Doukhobors, this surname was originally written as Shtuchnov and is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Shtuchniy. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the Ukrainian term shtuchnii, meaning “skillful”, “cunning” or “crafty”. The Shtuchnovs (Shtuchniys) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 the name was found to be the tenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoshnof, Stushnoe, Stoochinoff, Stoochnof, Stoochnoff, Stushnaff, Stoochnow, Stooshinoff, Stoshnoff, Stooshnof, Stooshnov, Stooshinoff, Stoushnow, Stushnoff, Steuchnoff, Stushnow, Stocknow, Stooshnoff, Stuchnow, Stuchinoff, Stuchnoff.  [Soundex Code S325]

Studenikin
nicknameСтуденикин. This surname originates from the dialect term studen’ meaning “icy cold” or “December”.  Studenik was the name given to a “cold” or “chilly” person.  The Studenikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S335]

Stupnikov
occupationalСтупников. This surname originates from the term stupnik, someone who made or sold stupni (“mortar”) or stupnyami (“footwear”). Note that this term also referred to a “beaten, even track” in a forest. The Stupnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Penza in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoopnikoff, Stupnikoff, Stoopnekoff, Stupnikow.   [Soundex Code S315]

Subbotin
nicknameСубботин. This surname originates from the term Subbota, meaning “Saturday”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born on the seventh day of the week. There were two unrelated branches of Subbotins among the Doukhobors, the original of which did not immigrate to Canada. However, a second family of non-Doukhobor Russian ancestry from the province of Yakutsk, Russia, immigrated to Canada with the Doukhobors after marrying into the Zbitnev family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soobotin, Subotin.  [Soundex Code S135]

Sukhachev
nicknameСухачев. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term sukhach, meaning a “dry”, “thin” or “hard’ person. Note that this term also referred to a “dry wine”. The Sukhachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookocheff, Sookachoff, Soukocheff, Sukochoff, Sokocheff, Sookotcheff, Sookochoff, Soukochoff, Souhachoff, Soohochoff, Sookochow, Sukachev.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sukharev
nicknameСухарев. This surname originates from the term sukhari, meaning “hardtack”, a hard, dry biscuit eaten by travellers and soldiers in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Sukharevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soukeroff, Soukoreff, Soukoroff, Sookoroff, Sukoroff, Sookeroff, Sukhoreff, Sukorow, Sookro, Sukorove, Sookero.  [Soundex Code S261]

Sukhodolin
locationalСуходолин. This surname originates from the term sukhodol, meaning a “dry, waterless valley” and may refer to an inhabitant of such a place. The Sukhodolins among the Doukhobors resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the early 19th century, the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Sukhorukov
nicknameСухоруков. This surname is derived from the term sukhoi (“dry”) + ruka (“arm”), meaning “dry-armed”. This term was given as a nickname to someone with a lame, paralyzed or missing arm. The Sukhorukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookarookoff, Saukarookoff, Sookorookoff, Sukharukoff, Saukerookoff, Soukerookoff, Sookorukoff, Suchorukoff, Suchorykoff, Sookerokoff, Soukorokoff, Sokorokoff, Sukerokoff, Sukorukoff, Sukorukow, Soukorookoff, Sukarukoff, Sukorokoff, Sookerukoff, Sukhorokoff, Sukorukove.  [Soundex Code S262]

Sukhoveev
nicknameСуховеев. This surname originates from sukhovei, the term for a “hot dry wind” on the Russian steppes. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Sukhovkin family after joining the Doukhobor movement. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sookavieff, Sookoveoff, Sukoveoff, Sookovieff, Sukovaoff, Sukavieff, Sukoveow, Sookaveiff, Sukhoveyev, Sukhovyev, Sukhoviev, Sukhovyov, Suchaveiff, Suhawieff, Suchovioff, Suchoweff, Sukhovioff, Soukovioff, Suchowew, Sukhoviov, Sukovave. [Soundex Code S211]

Sukhovkin
nicknameСуховкин. This surname is derived from the term sukhoi, meaning “dry”. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Sukhovka river in northern Russia or any one of several towns named Sukhovka or Sukhovo throughout Russia. The Sukhovkins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Sukhoveev after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S212]

Sukrutov
nicknameСукрутов. Sukrutov is derived from the term sukruta, meaning a “twisted rope”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trubitsin family in Tavria province, Russia in the early 19th century.   [Soundex Code S263]

Sulanov
nicknameСуланов. This surname may derive from the dialect term sula, meaning a “restless”, “fussy” or “fidgety” person. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic men’s name Sulan. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S451]

Sumkin
nicknameСумкин. This surname originates sumka, a diminutive form of the term suma, meaning “bag”, “satchel” or “handbag”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made, wore or used a bag. The Sumkins among the Doukhobors originated from Kiev province, Russia in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S525]

Surovtsov
nicknameСуровцов. This surname originates from the term surovets, a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Surovtsovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S613]

Surkov
nicknameСурков. This surname derives from the term surok, meaning “marmot” or “woodchuck”. The Surkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Suslin
nicknameСуслин. This surname originates from the term suslo, a type of sweet drink made from malt and flour in Old Russia.  Note that this term also refers to “mash”, a mixture of hot water and crushed grain used to produce malt beverages. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or drank suslo. The Suslins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Suslov
nicknameСуслов. This surname originates from the term suslo, a type of sweet drink made from malt and flour in Old Russia.  Note that this term also refers to “mash”, a mixture of hot water and crushed grain used to produce malt beverages. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or drank suslo. The Suslovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S241]

Susoev
firstnameСусоев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Susoi. The Susoyevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Susoyeff, Susoeff, Sosoyoff, Sysoyev.  [Soundex Code S210]

Suvorin
nicknameСуворин. This surname originates from the term suvor, meaning “gloomy”, “unsociable” or “severe”. The Suvorins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S165]

Suvorkin
nicknameСуворкин. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term suvorka, meaning “grim”, “gloomy” or “unsociable”. The Suvorkins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S162]

Suzdal’tsev
locationalСуздальцев. This surname is derived from Suzdalets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Suzdal, north-east of Moscow. The Suzdaltsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Svetlichny
locationalСветличний (Светличнов, Светлищев, Светличков). This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term svetlitsa, meaning a “white log hut”, “weaver’s log hut” or the “front room” or “drawing room” of a hut and may refer to someone who lived at such a place.  It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several places named Svetlitsa in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Svetlichkov, Svetlichnov and Svetlishchev by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Svetlichny, Svetlichnii, Svetlichnyi, Svetlichnij, Svetlichnov, Svetlichnoff, Swetlishnoff, Swetleshnoff, Swetlishneff, Swetlow, Svetlishchev, Svetlischev, Svetlishcheff, Swetlisheff, Swetlishoff, Svetlisheff, Svetlishoff, Swetlischeff, Swetlishow, Svetlischeff, Switlishoff.  [Soundex Code S134]

Svetlikov
nicknameСветликов. This surname originates from the term svetlik, a diminutive form of the term svetlyi (“light”) meaning “little light”. Note that this term also means “eyebright” (euphrasy), a type of flowering plant.  According to historical records, this surname was adopted by members of the Svetlov family after joining the Doukhobor movement.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Swetlikoff, Swetlikoe, Svetlikoff, Swetlikow, Sviatlikoff, Swetlicoe, Svetlikove, Svitlekoff, Swetlikove.  [Soundex Code S134; S342]

Svetlov
nicknameСветлов. Svetlov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term svetlo, meaning “light”, “bright” or “shining”. According to historical records, members of this family adopted the new surname Svetlikov after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S134]

Sviridov
firstnameСвиридов. This patronymic surname is derived from Svirida, a diminutive form of the men’s name Spiridon. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

– T –

Tanyushin
firstnameТанюшин. Tanyushin is derived from Tanyusha, a diminutive form of the women’s name Tatyana. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl’kov family in Tavria province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code T525]

Tarabukin
nicknameТарабукин. This surname originates from the term tarabuka, a type of string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the tarabuka, a maker of the instrument or perhaps a loud or shrill individual. The Tarabukins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T612]

Taranov
firstnameТаранов, Таранков. This patronymic surname, sometimes also written as Tarankov, is derived from the men’s name Taran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Taranoff, Terinoff, Taranow, Tarankov, Tarankoff. [Soundex Code T651]

Tarasiev
firstnameТарасиев. This patronymic surname is derived from Tarasii, the Old Russian form of the men’s name Taras. The Tarasievs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T621]

Tarasov
firstnameТарасов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Taras. There were two unrelated branches of Tarasovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Tambov and the Don region of Russia. In 1970 it was found to be the eighteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tarasoff, Trasov, Trasoff, Torosoff, Tarasow, Terasoff, Tarasove.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tatosov
firstnameТатосов. Tatosov is derived from the Armenian men’s name Tatos, meaning “fatherly”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Makaseev family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name, most likely as a nickname. [Soundex Code T321]

Telegin
nicknameТелегин. This surname originates from the term telega, meaning “cart”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured carts. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Novokshonov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code T425]

Telushkin
nicknameТелушкин. This surname originates from the term telushka, meaning “heifer” (a young unbred cow). Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T422]

Teplyakov
nicknameТепляков. This surname originates from the term teplyaki, a type of felt boot worn by peasants in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore teplayki, or perhaps a maker of such boots. The Teplyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T142]

Terekhov
firstnameТерехов. This patronymic surname is derived from Terekh, a diminutive form of the men’s name Terentii.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Terekoff, Terichow, Terrichoff, Terikow, Terikhoff, Terikoff, Terekove.  [Soundex Code T621]

Terent’ev
firstnameТерентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Terentii. There were two unrelated branches of Terent’evs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Kavkaz (Caucasus) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T653]

Tertishnikov
occupationalТертишников. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term tertish, meaning a “well-kneaded bread”. Tertishnik was the name given to a “dough-kneader” or “baker” of such bread. The Tertishnikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T632]

Tikhonov
firstnameТихонов. Tikhonov is derived from the men’s name Tikhon. The original Tikhonovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Note that Tikhonov also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Popov family in Tiflis and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname; it was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tehanoff, Tekanoff, Tekanow, Tickonoff, Tehanow, Tekano, Tihanoff. [Soundex Code T251]

Timofeev
firstnameТимофеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Timofei. The Timofeevs among the Doukhobors resided in the province of Irkutsk, Russia in the 19th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T511]

Tolmachev
occupationalТолмачев. This surname originates from the term tolmach, meaning “interpreter”. The Tolmachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. According to tradition, some members of this family adopted the new surname Samorodin after joining the Doukhobor movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T452]

Tolstoev
nicknameТолстоев. This surname originates from the term tolstoi, meaning “fat”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. The Tolstoevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tver, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T423] 

Tomilin
firstnameТомилин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Tomila. The Tomilins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tamelin, Tamilin, Tomlin, Tameelin, Tomelin.  [Soundex Code T545]

Tretyakov
nicknameТретяков. This surname originates from the term tretyak, meaning “third”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the third child in a family. The Tretyakovs among the Doukhobors originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T632]

Trofimenkov
firstnameТрофименков. This surname is derived from the men’s name Trofim. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trofimov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century. It was later adopted as an official surname by some family members. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Trofimenko, which is derived from the men’s name Trofim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Trofimenkoff, Trofemenkoff, Trofimenko, Trafimenkoff, Trofimenkow, Trofimenkove.  [Soundex Code T615]

Trofimov
firstnameТрофимов. Trofimov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Trofim. There were two unrelated branches of Trofimovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Penza and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T615]

Trubetskoy
locationalТрубецкой (Трубецков). This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from the princely estate of Trubets in Old Russia. Among the Doukhobors, it was later modified to Trubetskov by some family members. The Trubetskoys (Trubetskovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Trubetskoi, Trubetsky, Troubetzkoy, Troobetscoff, Trubetskoff, Trubitskoff, Troubitskoff, Troobetscoff, Tribitskoff, Troobetskoff.  [Soundex Code T613]

Trubitsin
nicknameТрубицин. This surname is derived from the Old Russian term trubitsa, meaning a small “pipe” or “horn”. The original Trubitsins among the Doukhobors originated from Ekaterinoslav province, Russia in the 18th century. Note that Trubitsin also occurred independently as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Trubetskoy family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Troobitsin, Trubitzin. [Soundex Code T613]

Trushin
firstnameТрушин. Trushin is derived from Trusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Trifon. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Ryl’kov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code T625]

Tsybulin
nicknameЦибулин. This surnameoriginates from the term tsybulya, meaning “onion”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Tsybulins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsybul’kin
nicknameЦибулькин. This surnameoriginates from the term tsybulya, meaning “onion”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Tsybul’kins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Poltava in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsyplakov
nicknameЦыплаков. This surname originates from the dialect term tsyplak, meaning “chick” or “baby bird”.  This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. The Tsyplakovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Orenburg, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tulikov
nicknameТуликов. This surname derives from the dialect term tulik, meaning a “sharp”, “quick”, “nimble”, “agile” or “good” fellow. The Tulikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T421]

Tulin
nicknameТулин. This surname originates from the term tul, meaning “quiver”, a case to hold the arrows of a hunter or warrior. It is also suggested that the name may derive from the verb tulit’ meaning “to hide” or “to conceal” or that it may indicate an ancestor who originated from Tula province, south of Moscow. The Tulins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T450]

Tulinov
nicknameТулинов. This name was originally Tulin. The -ov suffix ending was added after the surname was originally formed. It originates from the term tulo, meaning “quiver”, a case to hold arrows. The Tulinovs among the Doukhobors originated in Voronezh province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T451]

Tupikin
nicknameТупикин. This surname originates from the term tupik, meaning “blockhead” or “dolt”. The Tupikins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T125]

Turtsev
nicknameТурцев. This surname derives from the term turets, meaning a small “bison” or “bull”. Note that this term may also be used to refer to a “Turk”. It is also suggested that the name indicates an ancestor who originated from the Belorussian town of Turets. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T632]

Tyurin
nicknameТюрин. This surname originates from tyurya, the term given to bread steeped in water, kvass or milk (a meal eaten by beggars and the poor). Note that this term also referred to a “languid” or “spineless” individual. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb tiurit’ meaning “to lie” or “to confuse”. The Tiurins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov), Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T650]

– U –

Uglov
nicknameУглов. Uglov is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term ugol meaning “foundation-corner”. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Savely Kapustin (1743-1820) to a member of the Kruglov family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term ugol’ meaning “coal”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ogloff, Oglow, Ohlow, Uhlov, Oglou, Oglov, Ogoloff, Uhlow, Uglove.  [Soundex Code U241]

Ulasov
firstnameУласов. This patronymic surname is derived from Ulas, a Byelorussian form of the men’s name Vlas. The Ulasovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U421]

Ul’yashin
firstnameУльяшин. Ul’yashin is derived from Ulyasha, a diminutive form of the women’s name Ulyana. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Chernenkov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose matriarch bore this name. [Soundex Code U425]

Usachev
nicknameУсачев. This surname originates from the term usach, meaning “bushy moustache”. This term would have been given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy moustache. The Usachevs among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Osachov, Osachoff, Osatchoff, Osochoff, Osachow, Osacheff, Usachov, Usachiov, Usachoff, Oosachoff, Oosatcheff, Usachow, Usachyov, Usachove, Osachove.  [Soundex Code U221; O221]

Utkin
nicknameУткин. This surname originates from the term utka, meaning “duck”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a duck, perhaps a loud, gregarious individual, or a good swimmer. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U325]

Uvarov
firstnameУваров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Uvar. The Uvarovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U161]

Uverenniy
nicknameУверенний. Uverenniy is derived from a spiritual connotation for the term uverennie, meaning “assured of” or “convinced”. According to tradition, this surname was given by Doukhobor leader Peter “Lordly” Verigin (1859-1924) to a member of the Medvedev family on account of his outstanding Doukhobor faith and beliefs. Note that this Doukhobor surname occurred only in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Overenny, Overennay.  [Soundex Code O165]

– V –

Vanin
firstnameВанин. This patronymic surname is derived from Vanya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vannin, Wanin.  [Soundex Code V550]

Vanzhov
firstnameВанжов (Ванжа). Among the Doukhobors, Vanzhov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Vanzha. The -ov suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from Vanzha, a rare diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. The Vanzhovs (Vanzhas) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vanjoff, Wanjoff, Wanjoe, Vanzhov, Vangoff, Vandjoff, Vanjove, Van Joff.  [Soundex Code V521]

Varakin
firstnameВаракин. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Varaka. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V625]

Vasilenkov
firstnameВасиленков (Василенко). Among the Doukhobors, Vasilenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Vasilenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Vasily. The Vasilenkovs (Vasilenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wasilenkoff, Waselenkoff, Wasilenko, Wasilenkow, Vasilenko, Vasilenkove, Wasilenkove.  [Soundex Code V245; W245]

Vasil’ev
firstnameВасильев. Vasil’ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men’s name Vasily. There were two unrelated branches of Vasil’evs among the Doukhobors that originated from the Russian provinces of Tambov and Ekaterinoslav in the 18th century.  Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V241]

Vereshchagin
nicknameВерещагин. This surname originates from the term vereshchaga, meaning “chatterer”, “talker”, “grumbler” or “squeeler”. There were two unrelated branches of Vereshchagins among the Doukhobors that originated from Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century and resided in Irkutsk province, Russia in the 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vereshagin, Vereschagin, Verishine, Vereshine, Vereshagen, Vershagin, Verashegan, Verishagin, Wereschagin, Wirischagin.  [Soundex Code V622]

Verigin
nicknameВеригин. This surname originates from the term veriga, meaning “chain”, “fetter”, “shackle” or “bond”. The Verigins among the Doukhobors originated from the Kharkov-Ekaterinoslav region of Russia in the 18th century. Note that this surname was borne by several Doukhobor leaders including Peter “Lordly” Verigin (1859-1924) and his son Peter “Chistyakov” Verigin (1881-1939). In 1970 it was found to be the seventh most common Doukhobor surname in Canada.lEnglish spelling variants include: Verigen, Veregin, Verehin, Vergin.  [Soundex Code V625]

Vikhrov
nicknameВихров. This surname originates from the term vikhor, meaning “forelock” or “tuft”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vikhr’ meaning “whirlwind”. The Vikhrovs among the Doukhobors resided in Amur province, Russia in the late 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V261]

Viktorenkov
firstnameВикторенков. Among the Doukhobors this surname is derived from Viktorenka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Viktor, and it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Gololobov family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this name. Among non-Doukhobor Russians, this surname may also be a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Viktorenko, derived from the men’s name Viktor.  [Soundex Code V236]

Vinogradov
nicknameВиноградов. This surname is derived from the term vinograd, meaning (grape) “vine”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Vinogradovs among the Doukhobors resided in the Tomsk region of Russia in the mid-19th century, and in the Amur region in the latter 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V526]

Vlasov
firstnameВласов. Vlasov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Vlasii. There were two unrelated branches of Vlasovs among the Doukhobors that originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) and the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wlasoff, Wolosoff, Vlasoff, Vlasow.  [Soundex Code V421]

Vodopshin
nicknameВодопшин. This surname originates from the term voda (“water”) + the verb pit‘ (“to drink”) or “water-drinker”. This nickname was probably given to a drunkard. The Vodopshins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V312]

Volobuev
occupationalВолобуев. This surname is derived from the Don Cossack term volobui, meaning “oxen-slaughterer”. This name was given to a butcher who prepared oxen meat for food or sale. There were two unrelated branches of Volubuevs among the Doukhobors, one of which originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century, and the other of which resided in the Tobolsk-Yenisei region of Russia in the early 19th century, and the Amur region in the late 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V411]

Volodin
firstnameВолодин. This patronymic surname is derived from Volodya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vladimir. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V435]

Vorob’ev
nicknameВоробьев. Vorob’ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term vorob, meaning “sparrow”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sparrow, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. The Vorob’evs among the Doukhobors originated from the Azov region of Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vorobieff, Varabioff, Worobioff, Varabieff, Verabioff, Vorobow, Vorobeyov, Vorobiov, Vorobyev, Vorobiev, Variobiev, Varabave.  [Soundex Code V611]

Voronkov
nicknameВоронков (Воронов). Among the Doukhobors, this name was originally Voronov. The “k” was addedin the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term voron (“raven”) or vorona (“crow”). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voronkoff, Warankoff, Voronkow, Voronkove.  [Soundex Code V652]

Voykin
occupationalВойкин. This surname is derived from the term voyko, a diminutive form of the term voin, meaning “soldier” or “warrior” or else the term voy, meaning “howl” or “cry”.  The Voykins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the eleventh most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voykin, Woykin, Woikin, Voyken, Woiken, Waiken, Voiken.  [Soundex Code V250; W250]

Vyatkin
locationalВяткин. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from Vyatka province, east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vyatka, meaning “band” or “crowd” or “wedge”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vatkin, Viatkin, Wetkin, Wiatkin.  [Soundex Code V325]

Vypov
nicknameВыпов. This surname originates from the term vyp’ meaning “bittern”, a type of marsh bird. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bittern, perhaps a long-legged, shy or singing individual. The Vypovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V110]

Vyshlov
nicknameВышлов. Vyshlov is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the verb vyshel, meaning “to leave” or “to walk out”. According to tradition, this name was given to the original family patriarch after leaving the Russian Orthodox Church and converting to the Doukhobor faith. lEnglish spelling variants include: Wishloff, Wishlow, Vishloff, Wishlaw, Vishlov, Vishlove, Wishlove, Wieshlow.  [Soundex Code V241; W241]

– Y –

Yakovlev
firstnameЯковлев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yakov. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y214]

Yanin
firstnameЯнин. Yanin is derived from Yan, a variation of the Old Russian men’s name Ioann.  Among the Doukhobors, it originated in the late 19th century as an unofficial alternate surname for a family in Kars province, Russia whose official surname has not been identified. [Soundex Code Y550]

Yaroshenko
firstnameЯрошенко, Ярошев. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Yarosh, a diminutive form of the men’s name Erofei.  Among the Doukhobors, it was later Russianized to Yaroshev by dropping the -enko suffix ending in the mid-19th century. The Yaroshchenkos (Yaroshevs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Y625]

Yarovenko
firstnameЯровенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Yar, a diminutive form of the men’s names Yaropolk and Yaroslav. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term yaryy, meaning “furious” or “violent”. The Yarovenkos among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Y615]

Yashchenkov
firstnameЯщенков (Ященко). Among the Doukhobors, Yashchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Yashchenko. The -v ending was added in the first half of the 19th century. This name is patronymic in origin and derives from Yashka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yakov. The Yashchenkovs (Yashchenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tavria, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Yashchenkoff, Yaschenkoff, Yashchenko, Yaschenko, Yaschen.  [Soundex Code Y252]

Yashin
firstnameЯшин. Yashin is derived from Yasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yakov. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Kalmykov family in Elizavetpol province, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code Y250]

Yudin
firstnameЮдин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yuda. The Yudins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y350]

Yukin
firstnameЮкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Yuka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yuri. The Yukins among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y250]

Yurin
firstnameЮрин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yuri. There were two unrelated branches of Yurins among the Doukhobors that originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century and Orenburg province, Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y650]

Yuritsin
firstnameЮрицин. This patronymic surname is derived from Yurits, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yuri. The Yuritsins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Voronezh, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Youritson, Iuritsin, Yourichen, Urychen, Youritzin.  [Soundex Code Y632]

– Z –

Zabrodin
locationalЗабродин. This surname is derived from the terms za (“behind”, “beyond”) + brod (“ford”) and may refer to someone who lived beyond the ford of a river. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code Z163]

Zaichikov
nicknameЗайчиков. This surname is derived from zaichik, a diminutive form of the term zaits (“hare”) meaning “small hare”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a hare, perhaps a swift, agile or timid person. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Tolmachev family in the Bogdanovka region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname.  [Soundex Code Z221]

Zaitsev
nicknameЗайцев. Zaitsev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term zaits, meaning “hare”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled a hare in some respect, perhaps a swift, agile or timid individual. The Zaitsevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. In 1970 it was found to be the nineteenth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zaitseff, Zaitsoff, Zietsoff, Zaytsoff, Zaetsoff, Zeitzoff, Zaitzoff, Zaicoff, Sayzoff, Zaitsow.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zakharov
firstnameЗахаров. Zakharov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Zakhar. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z261]

Zakharushkin
firstnameЗахарушкин. Zakharushkin is derived from Zakharushka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Zakhar. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Postnikov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century, whose patriarch bore this name.  [Soundex Code Z262]

Zamyatin
nicknameЗамятин. This surname originates from the verb zamyat’, meaning “to hush up”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a quiet, hushed or mute person. The Zamyatins among the Doukhobors resided in the Tobol’sk-Yenisei region of Russia in the 19th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zamyatkin
nicknameЗамяткин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zamyatka, meaning “hesitation”, “excitement” or “confusion”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Petrov family in Tiflis province, Russia in the late 19th century.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zamyatnin
nicknameЗамятнин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zamyatnya, meaning “excitement”, “confusion” or “restlessness”. The Zamyatnins among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z535]

Zapasnoy
nicknameЗапасной. This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term zapasnoy, meaning “spare”, “reserve” or “auxiliary”.  The term may refer to a military conscript in reserve service in Old Russia. The Zapasnoys among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z125]

Zarshchikov
firstnameЗарщиков (Зарщенков). Among the Doukhobors, Zarshchikov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zarshchenkov. The –enko suffix ending was modified to –ikov in the first half of the 19th century. It is derived from Zarshka, a diminutive form of several men’s names including SvetozarNazar and Lazar.  The Zarshchikovs (Zarshchenkovs) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarchikoff, Zarchakoff, Zarchicoff, Zarchukoff, Zarchekoff, Zarchukow, Zarchikow, Zarschikov, Zarchikov, Zarchukov, Zarschukov, Zarshchinkov, Zarshchenkov.  [Soundex Code Z622, Z625]

Zarubin
nicknameЗарубин. This surname originates from the term zaruba, meaning “mark”, “scar” or “notch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual with some distinguishing mark or scar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarubin, Zaroobin.  [Soundex Code Z615]

Zbitnev
nicknameЗбитнев (Сбитнев). This surname was originally written as Sbitnev and is derived from the term sbiten, a hot drink popular in Old Russia made of honey and spices. Note that this term also referred to a “well-fed”, “dense” or “strong” individual. The Zbitnevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zbitnoff, Zbeetnieff, Sbitneff, Sbitnieff, Zbeetnoff, Zbeetneff, Bitnoff, Zbitnew, Zbitneff, Sbitnev, Zbitniff, Zbitniv, Zbitniw, Zbetinoff, Zbetnoff, Sbitney, Sbeetneff.  [Soundex Code Z135; S135]

Zdvizhkov
nicknameЗдвижков. This surname originates from the term sdvizhka, a dialect term for Vozdvisheniya Kresta (“Exaltation of the Cross”), a Russian ecclesiastical holiday celebrated on September 14th and may refer to someone born on that date.  Note that this term also refers to a “lateral” or “side” movement. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z312]

Zharikov
nicknameЖариков. This surname is derived from zharkoi, the reddish-yellow color of hot coal. The resulting nickname zharik was given to someone with reddish-orange hair color. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zharkii, meaning “burned”. The Zharikovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarikoff, Jarikoff, Zharikoff, Sharikoff, Zarikow, Zarikove, Zharikove.  [Soundex Code Z621]

Zhdanov
nicknameЖданов. This surname is derived from the term zhdanii, meaning “long awaited”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a long awaited child. The Zhdanovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Kostroma, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zheltenkov
nicknameЖелтенков (Желтенко). Among the Doukhobors, Zheltenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zheltenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It is derived from the term zheltyi, meaning “yellow”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with yellow (blonde) hair colour. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z435]

Zhernoklev
occupationalЖерноклев. This surname originates from the dialect term zhernoklei, meaning “millstone-cutter” or “millstone-grinder”. The Zhernoklevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Tambov, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z652]

Zhikharev
nicknameЖихарев. Zhikharev is derived from the term zhikhar, meaning a “daring”, “courageous”, “popular” or “merry” fellow. Note that this term also referred to a “dweller”. Note that Zhikharev occurred among the Doukhobors as an official surname, and independently, as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Semenov family in Elizavetpol and Kars provinces, Russia in the mid-19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zikhareff, Zhikhareff, Zhikaroff.  [Soundex Code Z261]

Zhilaev
nicknameЖилаев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zhila, meaning “hoarder” or “grabber”. Note that this term also refers to a “vein” or “artery”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zhirkhov
nicknameЖирхов. Zhirkhov is derived from the dialect term zhirukha, meaning a “wretch”, “knave” or “rogue”. Note that this term also referred to a “glutton” or “fat” person. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Goncharov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code Z621]

Zhivotkov
nicknameЖивотков, Животов. This surname, sometimes also written as Zhivotov, is derived from the term zhivot, meaning “belly”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed a large belly or girth. The Zhivotkovs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Sloboda-Ukraine (Kharkov) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gevatkoff, Givotkoff, Gevatkow, Jevotkoff, Jivatkoff, Jiwatkoff, Zhiwatkoff, Zeewatkoff, Shiwatkoff, Jevatkoff, Zhivotkove.  [Soundex Code Z132; G132]

Zhmaev
nicknameЖмаев. This surname is derived from the Old Russian verb zhimat’ meaning “to press”, “to squeeze” or “to pinch”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Jmieff, Zmieff, Jmaeff, Jmaiff, Jmayoff, Zmaeff, Jmio, Zmaiff, Zmiaff, Jmiaff, Gemieff, Jemieff, Zmioff, Jamieff, Jmioff, Shmaeff, Jamaeff, Zhmayev.  [Soundex Code Z510; J510]

Zhukov
nicknameЖуков. This surname originates from the term zhuk, meaning “beetle”. Note that this term also referred to a dark-haired person. The Zhukovs among the Doukhobors originated from the Don region of Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z210]

Zhuravlev
nicknameЖуравлев. This surname originates from the term zhuravl’ meaning “crane”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a crane, perhaps a tall, thin man with long, spindly legs. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zhuravloff, Zuravloff, Juriloff, Jeraloff, Zaurowloff, Zurloff, Zurivloff, Zurovloff, Juravleff, Zuravlow, Juravloff, Geuroloff, Shurawleff, Zaruloff, Zhurawleff, Zhuravlev, Zhuravlove, Zhuravlov, Geroloff, Zhuravliov, Zhuravlyov.  [Soundex Code Z614; J641]

Zibarev
nicknameЗибарев. This surname is derived from the Turkic term zibar, meaning “handsome”, “well proportioned” or “pleasing to the eye”. The Zibarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zibareff, Zibaroff, Zebroff, Zeberoff, Ziboroff, Ziebaroff, Zeebaroff, Ziberoff, Zeebroff, Zeboroff, Zeeboroff, Zibarov, Ziborov, Ziborev, Ziberev, Ziberov, Zibarov, Zibrov, Zibarove.  [Soundex Code Z161]

Zinov’ev
firstnameЗиновьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Zinovii. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z511]

Zlotov
nicknameЗлотов (Злотий). Among the Doukhobors, Zlotov is a Russianization of the Polish surname Zloty. The -ov suffix ending was added in the first half of the 20th century. It is derived from the Polish term zlot, meaning “golden”. The Zlotov (Zloty) family, originally of Polish ancestry from Russian Poland, joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Pykhtin family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zlotoff.  [Soundex Code Z431]

Zolotarev
occupationalЗолотарев. This surname originates from the term zolotar, meaning “goldsmith” or “gilder”, a craftsman who worked with gold. Note that this term also referred to a scavenger. The Zolotarevs among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z436]

Zubkov
nicknameЗубков. This surname originates from zubok, a diminutive form of the term zub (“tooth”) meaning “little tooth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone that matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zoobkoff, Zubkoff, Zubkow, Zubkoe, Zubko.  [Soundex Code Z121]

Zubenkov
nicknameЗубенков (Зубенко). Among the Doukhobors, Zubenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Zubenko. The -v suffix ending was added in the second half of the 19th century. It originates from the term zub, meaning “tooth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with large, prominent or missing teeth. The Zubenkovs (Zubenkos) among the Doukhobors originated from the province of Ekaterinoslav, Russia in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zoobenkoff, Zubinkoff, Zubenkoff, Zubenkow, Zabankoff, Zubenko, Zubenkove.  [Soundex Code Z152]

Zubilov
nicknameЗубилов. Zubilov is derived from the term zubilo, meaning “chisel”. Among the Doukhobors, it originated as an unofficial alternate surname for a branch of the Zubkov family in the Dmanisi region of Georgia in the late 19th and early 20th century, whose patriarch bore this nickname. [Soundex Code Z141]

Zvezdilin
nicknameЗвездилин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zvezdila, meaning “the fighter, from whose fists one sees stars (zvezdi)”. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z123]

Zvonov
nicknameЗвонов. This surname originates from the term zvon, meaning “ringing” (of bells). According to tradition, Zvonov was an early leader of the Doukhobors in Tambov province, Russia in the 18th century. Among the Doukhobors, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z151]

Zwick
locationalЗвик. This German surname is derived from the term zwick, meaning “pinch”. Note that this term was given to the farmer of a triangular piece of land. A Zwick family joined the Doukhobor movement in Canada after marrying into the Shcherbinin family.  [Soundex Code Z200]

Zybin
nicknameЗыбин. Zybin is a relatively uncommon surname in Russia. It originates from the term zyba, meaning “cradle”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb zybit’ meaning “to swing”. In 1970 it was found to be the twentieth most common Doukhobor surname in Canada. The Zybins among the Doukhobors originated from the Russian province of Tavria (Tauride) in the 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ziebin, Zeebin, Zeeben, Zeeban, Zeiben, Zeibin, Zeabin, Sibin, Zubin, Zibin.  [Soundex Code Z150]

Notes

To interpret the meaning of a surname convincingly, it is necessary to trace the name backwards over the centuries. It is unwise to depend on the modern form of a surname when seeking its etymology, for it is very common for a name to have changed in such a way as to be hardly recognizable. Accordingly, I have used the original 19th century Russian (Cyrillic) spelling of each surname to determine its root and meaning. I have also sought to avoid the use of “folk” etymology, whereby the form or meaning of an obscure word is corrupted or distorted in order to resemble a more familiar, meaningful word. 

When the Doukhobors arrived in Canada in 1899, there was no standard system for transliterating Russian (Cyrillic) spellings into the English (Latin) alphabet. To complicate matters, in the South Russian dialect spoken by the Doukhobors, certain letters were capable of more than one pronounciation. Thus, the Russian letter Г may be spelt as or H in English; the Russian letter В may be spelt as or W in English; the Russian letter Ф may be spelt as F or Kh in English; and the Russian letter O may be spelt as O or A in English. Furthermore, most Doukhobor immigrants were illiterate and had no notion that any one spelling of their surname was more correct than another. As a consequence, the English spelling of Doukhobor surnames became largely a matter of choice, and many spelling variants arose for each name. With this in mind, I have used the standard spelling of each surname, based on the U.S. Library of Congress System, followed by English spelling variants. 

Surname spelling variants have been painstakingly compiled from a variety of sources including: local telephone directories, census returns, birth, marriage and death records, local histories, legislative gazettes, homestead records, published genealogies, books, newspapers and periodicals, most notably ISKRA magazine.

Some Doukhobor families had two names – an official surname and an unofficial, alternate surname or family nickname. The family nickname was used to distinguish between unrelated families with the same surname or different branches of the same family. Very often the family nickname was passed down to later generations, either in place of the original surname or in addition to it. Some branches might then keep the original surname, and some might adopt the family nickname. After several generations, it was not uncommon to completely lose the memory of the original surname, or to forget which was the original and which was the family nickname.

The Soundex is a coded last name (surname) index based on the way a name sounds rather than the way it is spelled. Surnames that sound the same, but are spelled differently, like Zubkov, Zubkoff, Zubkove and Zoobkoff, have the same code and are filed together. The Soundex coding system was developed so that you can find a surname even though it may have been recorded under various spellings. Knowing a surname’s Soundex code is useful and important, since many public archives, libraries and other institutions use Soundex-based finding aids and research tools.

Bibliography

  • Benson, M., Dictionary of Russian Personal Names (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1964).
  • Bogdan, F., Dictionary of Ukrainian Surnames in Canada (Winnipeg: UVAN, 1974).
  • Dal, V.I., Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka (Moscow, 1999).
  • Fedosiuk, Y.A., Russkie Familii: Populiarnii Etomologicheskii Slovar (Moscow, 1996).
  • Hande, D., Changes of Name: The Saskatchewan Gazette 1917-1950 (Regina: Saskatchewan Genealogical Society, 1993).
  • Inikova, S.A., Correspondence to J. Kalmakoff re: Doukhobors, 1995-present.
  • Inikova, S.A., O Dukhoborcheskikh Familiakh in ISKRA No.1889 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., March 29, 2000).
  • Khalikov, A. Kh., 500 Ruski Familii c Bulgaro-Tatarski Prouzkhog (Sofia, 1993).
  • Kroutikhin, Mikhail, Correspondence to J. Kalmakoff re: Surnames, 1998-present.
  • Lapshinoff, S., List of Doukhobors Living in Saskatchewan in 1905 (Crescent Valley: 1996). 
  • National Archives of Canada, Immigration Branch, Central Regristry Files (RG 76, Volumes 183 to 185, Parts 1 to 14)     Microfilm Reel Nos. C-7337 to C-7341. 
  • Nikonov, V.A., Slovar Russkikh Familii (Moscow: 1993).
  • Petrovskii, N.A., Slovar Russkikh Lichnikh Imen (Moscow, 1968).
  • Popoff, E.A., Stories From Doukhobor History (Grand Forks: USCC, 1992).
  • Popoff, E.A., Memo to J. Kalmakoff Re: Doukhobors on the 1905 Voyage of the SS Southwark, October 15, 1999.
  • Popoff, J.E., Doukhobor History Quiz in ISKRA No.1633 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., December 3, 1986).
  • Popoff, J.E., Doukhobor History Quiz in ISKRA No.1670 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., September 7, 1988).
  • Saskatchewan Archives Board, Regina Branch, Microfilm Reel No. R.2.46.
  • Saskatchewan Gazette 1950-1965 (Regina: Saskatchewan Queen’s Printer).
  • Unbegaun, B.O., Russian Surnames (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).

This article was reproduced by permission in ISKRA Nos.1904-1911 (Grand Forks: U.S.C.C., 2001).

Origin and Meaning of Molokan Surnames

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff with Andrew J. Conovaloff

A study of the origin and meaning of Molokan surnames reveals many clues about our family history. In some cases they indicate the first name, trade or occupation, descriptive nickname, or ethnic or geographic origin of an early ancestor. This glossary contains roots and meanings of 702 Russian surnames occurring among the Molokans, together with the original Cyrillic spelling, transliterated English spelling, and English spelling variations. Note: to search for a particular surname, use the alphabetical index below or else use your browser’s <find> function by pressing <Control F> and typing in the name.

Index – ChDEFG/HIKLMNOPRSTUVYZ

 

– A –

Abakumov
firstnameАбакумов. This patronymic surname is derived from Abakum, a diminutive form of the men’s name Avakum. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abakumoff. [Soundex Code A125]

Abramov
firstnameАбрамов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Abram. lEnglish spelling variants include: Abramoff.  [Soundex Code A165]

Adamov
firstnameАдамов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Adam. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A351] 

Afanas’ev
firstnameАфанасьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Afanasy. lEnglish spelling variants include: Afanasiv, Afansev, Afanasev, Afanaseff, Afinsoff.  [Soundex Code A152]

Afonin
firstnameАфонин. This patronymic surname is derived from Afonya, a diminutive form of the men’s names AgafonAfanasy and Afonii.  [Soundex Code A155]

Agapov
firstnameАгапов. This surname is derived from the men’s name Agapei or the women’s name Agapa. lEnglish spelling variants include: Agapoff.  [Soundex Code A211] 

Aistov
nicknameАистов. This surname originates from the term aist, meaning “stork”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps a tall-legged or long-nosed individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A231]

Aksyonov
firstnameАксёнов. This patronymic surname is derived from Aksyon, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aksentii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Aksenoff, Aksionov, Axionoff, Aksionoff.  [Soundex Code A251]

Alatyrtsev
nicknameАлатырцев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term alatyrets, meaning “abusive”, “confused” or “uncertain”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A436]

Aldokushin
firstnameАлдокушин. This patronymic surname is derived from Aldokusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aldokim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Aldakushin, Aldacushion, Aldacushon.  [Soundex Code A432]

Aleksandrov
firstnameАлексадров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alexandroff, Alexandrov, Aleksandroff.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alekseev
firstnameАлексеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Aleksei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A421] 

Alennikov
firstnameАленников. This patronymic surname is derived from Alenik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alenikov.  [Soundex Code A452]

Alent’ev
firstnameАлентьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Alentii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aletii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alentieff, Alentoff.  [Soundex Code A453]

Alyoshin
firstnameАлёшин. This patronymic surname is derived from Aliosha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aleksei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alyoshin.  [Soundex Code A425]

Alkhutov
firstnameАлхутов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Alkhat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Alkhutoff, Alkhoutoff.  [Soundex Code A423]

Andreev
firstnameАндреев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Andrei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Andreeff, Andreff, Androff, Androw, Andrews.  [Soundex Code A536]

Anfimov
firstnameАнфимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Anfim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A515] 

Anishko
firstnameАнишко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Anishka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Onisim and Anisii and the women’s names Anna and Anisia.  [Soundex Code A522]

Antipov
firstnameАнтипов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Antip. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A531] 

Antonov
firstnameАнтонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Anton. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A535] 

Anufiev
firstnameАнуфриев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Anufrii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A511] 

Apashev
firstnameАпашев. This patronymic surname is derived from Apash, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ipaty.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A121]

Aprashin
firstnameАпрашин. This surname is derived from Aprasha, a diminutive form of the women’s names Praskovia and Evpraksia.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from Abrasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Abram.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A162]

Aref’ev
firstnameАрефьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Aref’, a diminutive form of the men’s name Arefey. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A611] 

Arinin
firstnameАринин. This matronymic surname is derived from the women’s name Arina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A655]

Arishin
firstnameАришин. This patronymic surname is derived from Arisha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Arinei and the women’s name Arina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A625]

Artishchev
nicknameАртищев. This surname originates from the dialect term rtishche, meaning “big mouth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed this quality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A632]  

Arutyunyan
nicknameАрутюнян. This Armenian surname is derived from the Armenian term harutiun, meaning “resurrection”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Arataunian, Arutunian, Arutjunjan.  [Soundex Code A635]

Arzhanov
nicknameАржанов. This surname originates from the term rzhanoi, meaning “neighing”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mordvinian men’s name Arzhai. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A625]

Astakhov
firstnameАстахов. This patronymic surname is derived from Astakha, a diminutive form of the men’s names Evstafii and Evstakhii.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A232]

Avdeev
firstnameАвдеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Avdei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A131] 

Avtaikin
nicknameАвтайкин. This surname originates from avtaika, a diminutive form of the Mordvinian term avtai, meaning “bear”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a bear, perhaps a great, awkward, hulking, powerful individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code A132]

– B –

Babaev
nicknameБабаев. This surname derives from the Tatar term babai, meaning “grandfather”. This should not be confused with the more familiar Russian term baba, meaning “grandmother” or “old woman”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Babayeff, Babaeff, Bebieff, Bibaeff, Bibayoff, Bibieff, Bibioff, Bibyoff, Babaew, Bebaeff, Babayev.  [Soundex Code B110]

Babakov
nicknameБабаков. This surname originates from the dialect term babak, meaning “marmot” (groundhog or woodchuk). Note that this term also referred to a sleepy, dense, solitary, small, clumsy or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B121]

Baev
nicknameБаев. This surname originates from the dialect verb bait’ meaning “to speak” or “to tell”. Bai was the term given to a “chatterer” or “storey-teller”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term bai, meaning “lord” or “noble”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B100]

Bakholdin
nicknameБахолдин. This surname originates from the dialect term bakholda, meaning “boaster”, “idler” or “talker”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Baholden, Bakholden, Baholdin.  [Soundex Code B243]

Balakhonov
nicknameБалахонов. This surname originates from the term balakhon, a type of loose overalls worn by men in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or perhaps wearer of balakhon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B425]

Balikhin
nicknameБалихин. This surname originates from the dialect term balikhoi, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B425]

Bannikov
occupationalБанников. This surname originates from the term bannik, the “attendant” or “user” of a bathhouse (banya). Bannik was also the name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit that place. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B521]

Baranov
nicknameБаранов. This surname originates from the term baran, meaning “ram”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a ram, perhaps a gentle, affectionate personality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B651]

Barsukov
nicknameБарсуков. This surname originates from the term barsuk, meaning “badger” or in some dialects, “wild boar”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a badger or wild boar, perhaps a stubborn, wild or fierce individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B622]

Baryshev
nicknameБарышев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term barysh, meaning “profit”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich and wealthy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B621]

Bashkin
nicknameБашкин. This surname originates from the Tatar term bashka, meaning “head”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B225]

Basov
nicknameБасов. This surname originates from the dialect term basyy, meaning “beautiful” or “visible”.  It is also suggested that the name originated, among the Russian Orthodox clergy, from the Latin term basa (bass), to describe someone with a deep, bass singing voice.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B210]

Batyaev
nicknameБатяев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term batya, meaning “father”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mongol term bata, meaning “strong” or “steady”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bataeff, Bataiff, Bataoff, Batioff, Botieff, Batoeff, Batoev, Batuev, Batieff, Batueff.  [Soundex Code B310]

Bavin
nicknameБавин. This surname derives from the dialect term bava, meaning “sluggish”, “slow” or “dilatory”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bivin, Biven, Bavin, Baven.  [Soundex Code B150]

Bazykin
nicknameБазыкин. This surname originates from the dialect term bazyka, meaning “quarrelsome”, “captious” or “talker”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bazikin, Bazigin.  [Soundex Code B225]

Belikov
nicknameБеликов. This surname originates from belik, a diminutive form of the term belyi, meaning “white”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with blond, grey or white hair, a fair complexion, or perhaps a clean or pure individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belikoff, Bellcove, Beliakoff.  [Soundex Code B421]

Belogorov
locationalБелогоров. This surname originates from the term belyi (“white”) + gor (“mountain”) and refers to someone who lived near a white mountain. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B426]

Belousov
nicknameБелоусов. This surname originates from the term belyi (“white”) + us (“moustache”) or “white-moustache”. The resulting nickname belous (pronounced belowoos) was given to someone with a white, light or greyish moustache. lEnglish spelling variants include: Belousoff. [Soundex Code B421]

Belyaev
nicknameБеляев. This surname originates from belyai, a diminutive form of the term belyi, meaning “white”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with blond, grey or white hair, a fair complexion, or perhaps a clean or pure individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B410]

Bezzubtsev
nicknameБеззубцев. This surname originates from bezzubets, the term for someone without (bez) teeth (zubyi). This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B213]

Biryukov
nicknameБирюков. This surname originates from the term biryuk, meaning “wolf”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Berekoff, Berikoff, Berukoff, Birukoff, Barikoff, Berokoff, Birokoff, Burikoff, Berekow, Berikow, Berukow, Birookoff, Birukow, Biryoukoff, Bierukoff, Birekoff, Biriukov, Biriukove, Berukove.  [Soundex Code B621]

Bizyaev
nicknameБизяев. This surname originates from the dialect term bizyai, meaning “short-sighted” or “weak-sighted”. This term was given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bizyaeff, Bizayiff, Bizieff, Bezayiff, Bizayieff.  [Soundex Code B210] 

Blokhin
nicknameБлохин. This surname originates from the term blokha, meaning “flea”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B425]

Bobylyov
occupationalБобылёв. This surname originates from the term bobyl‘ meaning a “landless peasant”. Note that this term also referred to a “solitary” or “lonely” man. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bobiloff.  [Soundex Code B141]

Bobyshev
nicknameБобышев. This surname derives from bobysh, a diminutive form of the term bob, meaning “bean”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bobysheff, Bobyshov, Bobishoff, Babashoff, Babeshoff, Babishoff, Babshaw, Babshoff, Babushoff, Babshow.   [Soundex Code B121]

Bocharnikov
occupationalБочарников. This surname originates from the dialect term bocharnik, meaning “cooper”, a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B265]

Bogdanov
firstnameБогданов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Bogdan. The name Bogdan (“given by God”) was frequently given to illegitimate children and foundlings in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bagdanof, Bagdanoff, Bogdanoff, Bagdanove, Bagdonoff, Bagdanov, Baghdanov, Bogdonoff, Bogdonov.  [Soundex Code B235]

Bogunov
nicknameБогунов. This surname originates from the dialect term bogun, meaning “ledum palustre” or “labrador tea”, a type of plant with strongly aromatic leaves used in Old Russia to make herbal tea. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B251]

Bokin
nicknameБокин. This surname originates from the term bok, meaning the “side” or “flank” of one’s body or torso. This term may have been given as a nickname to a lopsided or broadsided person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B250]

Boldin
nicknameБолдин. This surname originates from the dialect term boldoi, meaning “cudgel” or “sledge hammer”. Note that this term also referred to a dense individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B435]

Boldyrev
nicknameБолдырев. This surname originates from boldyr, the term for a child of a mixed marraige, for example, the son of a Russian and Tatar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bolderoff, Boldiroff, Boldareff, Boldroff, Bolder.  [Soundex Code B436]

Bolotin
locationalБолотин. This surname originates from the term boloto, meaning “swamp” or “marsh” and refers to someone who lived near such a place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Boloten, Balotin.  [Soundex Code B435]

Bondarev
occupationalБондарев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term bondar, meaning “cooper”, a craftsman who manufactured wooden barrels, casks, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for cooper – bochkar) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or else a Russianized Ukrainian surname. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bondareff, Bonderoff, Bondoreff, Bondaroff, Bondarow, Bondariff, Bonderove, Bonderov, Bonderow.  [Soundex Code B536]

Borisov
firstnameБорисов. Borisov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Boris. lEnglish spelling variants include: Barisoff, Berisoff, Borisoff.  [Soundex Code B621]

Borodin
nicknameБородин. This surname originates from the term boroda, meaning “beard”. This term was given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy beard. lEnglish spelling variants include: Boridin, Barodin, Baradin, Baradine, Borodinoff.  [Soundex Code B635]

Bryukhin
nicknameБрюхин. This surname originates from the dialect term bryukho, meaning “belly”, “stomach” or “paunch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent belly or girth. lEnglish spelling variants include: Brukhin, Brukin. [Soundex Code B625]

Bubnov
nicknameБубнов. This surname originates from the term buben, meaning “tambourine”. Note that this term also referred to an “impoverished”, “idle” or “wasted” individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bubnow, Bubnoff. [Soundex Code B151]

Buchnev
nicknameБучнев. This surname originates from the term buchen‘ meaning “bull”, “frog”, “bumblebee” and “bittern” in various dialects. All of these animals make a sound perceived as bu-bu. lEnglish spelling variants include: Buchneff, Butchnew, Butchinoff, Butchnoff, Buchnoff, Bushneff.  [Soundex Code B251]

Budanov
nicknameБуданов. This surname originates from the dialect term budan, a type of soup made with flour for thickening. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B351]

Bugrov
locationalБугров. This surname originates from the term bugor, meaning “hill”, “hillock”, “heap” or “mound” and may refer to someone who lived or worked near such a place. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bogroff, Boogroff, Boogrove, Boogrov.  [Soundex Code B261]

Bukharov
nicknameБухаров. This surname originates from the term bukhara, meaning “ground”, “hay meadow”, “poor”, “tavern” and “fireplace” in various dialects. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Uzbek city of Bukhara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bukroff, Buckroff, Bukaroff, Bucaroff, Bukrow.  [Soundex Code B261]

Bulgakov
nicknameБулгаков. This surname originates from the Turkic term bulgak, meaning “troublesome”. Note that this surname was borne by Feodor Bulgakov (aka David Evseevich) co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Saratov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B422]

Burenin
nicknameБуренин. This surname derives from the term burenoi, meaning “brown”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with brown hair colour. lEnglish spelling variants include: Brenin.  [Soundex Code B655]

Burov
nicknameБуров. This surname derives from the term buryy, meaning “brown” or “bay”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish-brown hair colour. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B610]

Burtsev
nicknameБурцев. This surname originates from the dialect term burets, meaning “brown” or “bay”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish-brown hair colour.  Note this term also referred to an “ordinary-looking” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code B632]

Bychkov
nicknameБычков. This surname originates from the term bychok, meaning a “young ox” or “bullock”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bichkoff, Bechkoff, Batchkoff.  [Soundex Code B221]

Bykanov
nicknameБыканов. This surname originates from bykan, a diminutive form of the term byk (“bull”) meaning “little bull”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a lively, frisky or headstrong disposition. lEnglish spelling variants include: Bekanoff.  [Soundex Code B251]

– Ch –

Chekanov
nicknameЧеканов. This surname originates from the term chekan, a fighting axe with a long handle. Note that this term also referred to a “punch”, “die” or “stamp”. This nickname may have been given to someone who manufactured or used this or tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chekanoff, Chekunoff, Chicanoff, Chickanoff, Chickenoff, Chikenoff, Chickinoff.  [Soundex Code C251]

Chekushkin
nicknameЧекушкин. This surname originates from the dialect term chekushka, meaning “small hare” or “fieldmouse”. Note that this term also referred to an irrepressible chatterer or liar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Checkushkin.  [Soundex Code C222]

Chepliev
nicknameЧеплиев. This surname originates from the dialect verb cheplyati, meaning “to attach”, “to suspend”, “to fasten” and “to hang”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term chapli, meaning “heron”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C141]

Cheremisin
locationalЧеремисин. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Cheremisa, a Mordvinian people. lEnglish spelling variants include: Cherimisin, Czermisin.  [Soundex Code C652]

Cheremisov
locationalЧеремисов. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Cheremisa, a Mordvinian people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C652]

Chernikov
nicknameЧерников. This surname originates from the term chernik, meaning “bilberry” or “whortleberry”. Note that chernik is also a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning “black”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernikoff, Chernakoff, Chernekoff, Cherney.  [Soundex Code C652]

Chernobaev
nicknameЧернобаев. This surname originates from the term chernoi (“black”) + the verb bait’ ( “to speak”), meaning “one who speaks black”. This nickname was given to someone who spoke obscenely or vulgarly. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernabaeff, Chernobaeff, Chernobieff.  [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyaev
nicknameЧерняев. This surname originates from chernyai, a variant form of the term chernyi, meaning “black”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code C651]

Chernyshev
nicknameЧернышов. This surname originates from chernysh, a diminutive form of the term chernyi, meaning “black”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Chernisheff, Chernishoff.  [Soundex Code C652]

Cherny
nicknameЧерны. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term chernyi, meaning “black”. This nickname may describe someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C650]

Cheshev
locationalЧешев. This surname originates from the dialect term chesh, meaning “Czech” and indicates an ancestor who originated from the Czech lands. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chesnokov
nicknameЧесноков. This surname originates from the term chesnok, meaning “garlic”. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C252]

Chichov
nicknameЧичов. This surname originates from the dialect term chich, meaning “hay” (growing on a marsh). lEnglish spelling variants include: Chichoff, Cheechoff, Cheechov.  [Soundex Code C210]

Chindin
firstnameЧиндни. This patronymic surname is derived from Chind, a diminutive form of the Mordvin men’s names Chindyapa, Chindyava or Chindyaika. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C535]

Chugunov
nicknameЧугунов. This surname originates from the term chugun, meaning “cast-iron” or “pig-iron”. This term may have been given as a nickname to hard or brittle person or to an iron-worker who made cast-iron products. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code C251]

– D –

Dalmatov
firstnameДалматов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Dalmatii. Note that this surname was borne by Semeon Dalmatov, co-founder of the Molokan movement in Saratov province, Russia in the late 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dalmatoff, Dolmatoff, Dolmatov, Delmatoff.  [Soundex Code D453] 

Danilov
firstnameДанилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Danila. lEnglish spelling variants include: Daniloff.  [Soundex Code D541]

Dashkov
firstnameДашков. This surname, also written as Dashkin,is derived from Dashka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Darii and Dasii and the women’s names Daria, Dasia, Bogdana and Ada. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code D221]

Davydov
firstnameДавыдов. Davydov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Davyd. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D131]

Deikov
nicknameДеиков. This surname originates from the dialect verb deikati, meaning “to chatter”, “to complain” or “to speak now and then”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed these traits. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D210]

Deriabin
nicknameДерябин. This surname originates from the dialect term deriaboi, meaning “crybaby”, “squabbler”, ” fighter” and “restless”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Derabin, Driabin, Deryabin.  [Soundex Code D615]

Derkachov
nicknameДеркачов. This surname originates from the term derkach, meaning “crake”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps someone with jerky movements or someone with a voice like the cry of a crake. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D622]

Desyatov
nicknameДесятов. This surname originates from the term desyat’ meaning “ten”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the tenth child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Desatoff, Desyatov.  [Soundex Code D231]

Dirin
nicknameДирин. This surname originates from the term dira, meaning “hole”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D650]

Dmitriev
firstnameДмитриев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Dmitry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Demetrieff, Demetroff, Demetriff.  [Soundex Code D536]

Dobrynin
firstnameДобрынин. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Dobrynya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dobrenen, Dobrinen, Dobrinin, Dubrinin.  [Soundex Code D165]

Dolgopolov
nicknameДолгополов. This surname is derived from the term dolgoi (“long”) + pol (“skirt”). This nickname was frequently given to Orthodox clergy because of their robes with long skirts. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D421]

Dolgov
nicknameДолгов. This surname originates from the term dolgoi, meaning “long”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term dolg, meaning “duty”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dolgoff, Dalgoff.  [Soundex Code D421]

Donetskov
locationalДонецков. This name is properly Donetsky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. This surname indicates a family that originated from the Donets river in South Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D532]

Donskoy
locationalДонской. This surname indicates a family that originated from the Don river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Donskoi, Donskoj, Donske.  [Soundex Code D520]

Dorofeev
firstnameДорофеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Dorofei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drafeiv.  [Soundex Code D611]

Drachev
nicknameДрачев. This surname originates from the term drach, meaning “fighter” or “scrapper”.  Note that this term also means “teal” (small bird) in some dialects. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed these traits. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D621]

Drobyshev
nicknameДробышев. This surname originates from the dialect term drobysh, meaning someone who takes small, fractional steps. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drabshoff, Drobshoff. [Soundex Code D612]

Drozdov
nicknameДроздов. This surname originates from the term drozd, meaning “blackbird” or “thrush”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a blackbird, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Drozdoff, Drazdoff, Drozdow, Drazdow, Drozdove, Drazdove.  [Soundex Code D623]

Druginin
nicknameДругинин. This surname originates from the term druginya, meaning a (female) “friend”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed this quality or matched this description.  [Soundex Code P625] 

Druzhinin
nicknameДружинин. This surname originates from the term druzhina, meaning “comrades”, “friends”, “team” or “group”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who belonged to a group of friends.  [Soundex Code P625] 

Dudin
nicknameДудин. This surname originates from the term duda, meaning “pipe” or “horn”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played the horn, a horn-maker or perhaps a loud individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D350]

Dunaev
locationalДунаев. This surname indicates a family that originated from the river Dunai (Danube). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D510]

Durakov
nicknameДураков. This surname originates from the term durak, meaning “fool”, “idiot” or “simpleton”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Durakoff, Dorskoff.  [Soundex Code D621]

Dutov
nicknameДутов. This surname originates from the term dutii, meaning “haughty”, “inflated” or “boastful”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dutoff, Dootoff, Doutoff, Dotoff, Dutow, Dutove.  [Soundex Code D310]

Dvornin
occupationalДворнин. This surname originates from the dialect term dvornyi, meaning “domestic”, “servant” or “menial”, one that performs duties about the person or home of a master or employer. lEnglish spelling variants include: Dvorinin.  [Soundex Code D165]

D’yakonov
occupationalДьяконов. This surname originates from the term d’yakon, meaning “deacon”, an ecclesiastical official who assisted in Russian Orthodox church services, read psalms, assisted the priest, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code D251]

– E –

Efremov
firstnameЕфремов. Efremov is derived from the men’s name Efrem (pronounced Yefrem). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E165]

Egorov
firstnameЕгоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Egor (pronounced Yegor). lEnglish spelling variants include: Egoroff, Egorow, Egroff, Egeroff, Yegorov, Yegoroff, Ehoroff, Yehoroff.  [Soundex Code E261]

Ekimov
firstnameЕкимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Ekim, a variant form of the men’s name Akim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E251]

El’fimov
firstnameЕльфимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Elfim, a diminutive form of the men’s name Evfimii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E415]

Erkin
firstnameЕркин. This patronymic surname is derived from Erka (pronounced Yerka) a diminutive form of the men’s names Erofei (pronounced Yerofei) and Erast (pronounced Yerast). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E6252]

Ermakov
firstnameЕрмаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Ermak (pronounced Yermak) a diminutive form of the men’s name Ermolai (pronounced Yermolai). lEnglish spelling variants include: Ermakoff, Ermacoff, Yermakoff.  [Soundex Code E652]

Ermolov
firstnameЕрмолов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Ermolai (pronounced Yermolai). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code E654]

Eropkin
firstnameЕропкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Eropka (pronounced Yeropka) a diminutive form of the men’s name Erofei (pronounced Yerofei). lEnglish spelling variants include: Eropken.  [Soundex Code E612]

Eseev
firstnameЕсеев. This patronymic surname is derived from Esei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Evsevei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E210]

Estagin
firstnameЕсtагин. This patronymic surname is derived from Estaga, a diminutive form of the men’s name Evstafii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Estagen.  [Soundex Code E232]

Evdokimov
firstnameЕвдокимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Evdokim (pronounced Yevdokim)lEnglish spelling variants include: Evdokimoff, Evdakimoff, Evdokimow, Evdokimiff, Evdekimoff, Yevdokimov, Yevdokimoff.  [Soundex Code E132]

Evseev
firstnameЕвсеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Evsei (pronounced Yevsei). lEnglish spelling variants include: Evseaff, Evseff, Efseaff, Evseeff.  [Soundex Code E121]

Evstigneev
firstnameЕвстигнеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Evstignei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code E123]

– F –

Fadeev
firstnameФадеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Fadei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fadeeff, Fadeff, Fadieff, Fadaiow, Fadayow.  [Soundex Code F310]

Fedchenko
firstnameФедченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Fedka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Feodor.  [Soundex Code F325]

Fedorenko
firstnameФедоренко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Feodor.  [Soundex Code F365]

Fedorov
firstnameФедоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Feodor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Federoff, Fedoroff.  [Soundex Code F361]

Fedos’ev
firstnameФедосьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Fedosii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Fedosei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F321]

Fedotov
firstnameФедотов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Fedot. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fedotoff.  [Soundex Code F331]

Feshin
firstnameФешин. This patronymic surname is derived from Fesha, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Feogen, Feodosii and Feoktist. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F250]

Fes’kin
firstnameФеськин. This surname is derived from Fes’ka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Feodosii and Fespesii and the women’s names Fessalonika and Fessalonikiya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F250]

Fetisov
firstnameФетисов. This patronymic surname is derived from Fetis, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Feoktist. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fetesoff, Fettisoff, Fetizow, Fettis.  [Soundex Code F321]

Filatov
firstnameФилатов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Filat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filatoff.  [Soundex Code F431]

Filimonov
firstnameФилимонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Filimon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F455] 

Filippov
firstnameФилиппов. Filippov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Filipp. lEnglish spelling variants include: Filipoff, Fillipoff, Phillipoff, Philipoff, Filapoff, Filipow.  [Soundex Code F411]

Fisunov
firstnameФисунов. This patronymic surname is derived from Fisun, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s names Afisa, Felitsata and Fista. lEnglish spelling variants include: Fesunoff.  [Soundex Code F251]

Fomichev
firstnameФомичев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Foma and means “son of Foma”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F521]

Fomin
firstnameФоминов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Foma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code F550]

Frolov
firstnameФролов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Frol. lEnglish spelling variants include: Froloff, Frolove. [Soundex Code F641]

– G/H –

Galkin
nicknameГалкин. This surname originates from the term galka, meaning “jackdaw”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of the bird, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G425]

Galochekov
firstnameГалочеков. This matronymic surname is derived from Galochek, a diminutive form of the women’s name Galina. lEnglish spelling variants include: Guluchikoff.  [Soundex Code G422]

Gal’tsev
firstnameГальцев. This patronymic surname is derived from Gal’ets, a diminutive form of the men’s name Galaktion and the women’s name Galina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G432]

Galyaev
firstnameГаляев. This patronymic surname is derived from Galya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Galaktion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Georgiev
firstnameГеоргиев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Georgii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Georgeoff.  [Soundex Code G621]

Glazastov
nicknameГлазастов. This surname originates from the dialect term glazasti, meaning “sharp-eyed”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Glezasoff.  [Soundex Code G422]

Glazov
nicknameГлазов. This surname originates from the term glaz, meaning “eye”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with striking or prominent eyes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G421]

Gogolevsky
locationalГоголевскйй. This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named GogolevoGogolevka or Gogolevskoy, so called from the term gogol, meaning “golden-eye duck”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gouglavaysky.  [Soundex Code G241]

Golitsin
nicknameГолыцин. This surname originates from the term golitsa, meaning “mitten”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore mittens or who made mittens. lEnglish spelling variants include: Galitsin, Golitzin, Galitzen, Galitzen.  [Soundex Code G432]

Goloshchapov
nicknameГолощапов. This surname originates from the dialect term goloshchap, meaning a “boastful pauper”, the dandy who has nothing to show off. This term may have been given as a derisive nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G422] 

Golovachev
nicknameГоловачев. This surname originates from the term golovach, meaning “big” or “large” “head” (golova). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Note that this term also referred to a “bullhead” fish. lEnglish spelling variants include: Holovachev, Holovachoff, Hallivichoff, Holwachoff, Hall.  [Soundex Code G412]

Golovastikov
nicknameГоловастиков. This surname originates from the term golovastik, meaning “tadpole”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a tadpole. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G412]

Golubov
nicknameГолубов. This surname originates from the term golub, meaning “pigeon” or “dove”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a keeper of doves, an amourous person, or someone mild and gentle as a dove. lEnglish spelling variants include: Goluboff, Goloboff, Golobif, Golobeff, Golubev, Globoff, Golubove, Golobiff, Golubef, Golubiff.  [Soundex Code G411]

Golubyatkin
nicknameГолубяткин. This surname originates from the dialect term golubyatka, meaning “pigeon” or “dove”. Note this term also referred to a “maiden”.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G413]

Golyaev
nicknameГоляев. This surname may originate from the term golyi, meaning “naked” or “destitute”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb gulyat’ meaning “to walk” or “to stroll”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G410]

Goncharenko
occupationalГончаренко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term gonchar, meaning “potter”, a craftsman or artisan who made and sold pots, dishes, and other earthenware vessels out of clay.   [Soundex Code G526]

Gorbachev
nicknameГорбачев. This surname originates from the term gorbach, meaning “hunchback”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G612]

Gorbenko
nicknameГорбенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term gorb, meaning “hump” or “hunchback”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  [Soundex Code G615] 

Gorbulov
nicknameГорбулов. This surname originates from the term gorbulya, meaning a female “hunchback”. This term was given as a nickname to a woman who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorbuloff.  [Soundex Code G614]

Gorchakov
nicknameГорчаков. This surname originates from the dialect term gorchak, meaning “persicaria” or “peachwort”, a type of plant with a bitter root. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Turkic term gorchak meaning “statue”, “doll” or a “very tall person”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G622]

Gorokhov
nicknameГорохов. This surname originates from the term gorokh, meaning “peas”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. The Gorokhovs among the Molokans resided in Elizavetpol province, Russia prior to emigrating to America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gorohoff.  [Soundex Code G621]

Goryanov
locationalГоряинов. This surname originates from the term goryanin, meaning “mountaineer” and indicates a mountain inhabitant. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G651]

Grachev
nicknameГрачев. This surname originates from the term grach, meaning “rook”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of this bird, perhaps a noisy, harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G621]

Granchikov
firstnameГранчиков. This surname is derived from the men’s name Granchik, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Gran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Granchukoff.  [Soundex Code G652]

Grankin
firstnameГранкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Granka, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Gran. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Latin term granum, meaning “grain”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G652]

Grebenkin
nicknameГребенкин. This surname originates from the term grebenka, meaning “crest” or “comb”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gribenkin, Gribionkin.  [Soundex Code G615]

Grekov
locationalГреков. This surname originates from the term grek, meaning “Greek” and indicates a family that originated from Greece. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G621]

Gridnev
occupationalГриднев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term griden, the “soldier”, “guardsman” or “princely bodyguard” in Old Russia.   It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term gridnei, meaning “prince quarters” in a palace. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G635]

Grigor’ev
firstnameГригорьев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Grigory. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gregorieff, Gregoroff, Grigorieff, Grigorov.  [Soundex Code G626]

Grigorok
firstnameГригорок. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Grigorok, a diminutive form of the men’s name Grigory. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gregarok.  [Soundex Code G626]

Gritsik
firstnameГрицик. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Gritsa, a diminutive form of the men’s name Grigory. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G632]

Grudzien
nicknameГрудзиен. This Polish surname originates from the Polish term grudzien, meaning “December”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child born in the last month of the year.  [Soundex Code G632]

Grushenkov
firstnameГрушенков. This patronymic surname is derived from Grushenka, a diminutive form of the women’s name Agrafena. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G625]

Grymzin
nicknameГрумзин. This surname originates from the term grymza, a type of red grape. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G652]

Gudimov
firstnameГудимов. This patronymic surname is derived from Gudim, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Gudimir. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gudimoff, Gudimow, Goudimoff, Goudima.  [Soundex Code G351]

Gudnin
nicknameГуднин. This surname originates from the term gudenie, meaning “buzzing”, “droning”, “humming” or “honking”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made this noise.  Among the Molokans this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code G355]

Gunin
firstnameГунин. This surname is derived from Gunya, a diminutive form of the men’s names Georgii, Egor and Sergei and the women’s name Agrippina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code G550]

Gurov
firstnameГуров. This patronymic surname is derived from Gura, a diminutive form of the men’s name Gurii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Guroff, Gureff.  [Soundex Code G610]

Gusev
nicknameГусев. This surname originates from the term gus, meaning “goose”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goose. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gusiff, Goosseff, Goosieff, Goosev, Gooseff, Ghosoph, Gosev, Goussev.  [Soundex Code G210]

Gvozdev
nicknameГвоздев. This surname originates from the term gvozd’ meaning “nail” or “peg”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a tall, thin person or perhaps someone with a strong, firm character. lEnglish spelling variants include: Gvozdeff, Gvozdiff, Gozdiff, Gozdieff, Gozdeff, Niles.  [Soundex Code G123]

– I –

Ignatov
firstnameИгнатов. Ignatov is derived from the men’s name Ignaty. lEnglish spelling variants include: Egnatoff. [Soundex Code I253]

Igumnov
occupationalИгумнов. This surname originates from the term igumna, meaning “abbot”, the superior of an Orthodox monastery for men. As an abbot had no right to marry and have children, this name must have been borne by peasants belonging to a monastery, or perhaps given to child by religiously devout parents. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I251]

Il’in
firstnameИльин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Ilya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I450]

Inyukin
firstnameИнюкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Inyuka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Inokentii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I525]

Isaev
firstnameИсаев. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Isaiya.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I210]

Isakov
firstnameИсаков. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Isak. lEnglish spelling variants include: Esakoff, Eskoff, Issakoff, Isakoff.  [Soundex Code I221]

Ivanikov
firstnameИваников. This patronymic surname is derived from Ivanik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Evanikoff.  [Soundex Code I152]

Ivanov
firstnameИванов. Ivanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from the men’s name Ivan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ivanoff, Evanoff. [Soundex Code I151]

Ivliev
firstnameИвлиев. Ivliev is derived from Ivlii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Iolii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code I141]

– K –

Kadatsky
locationalКадацкий. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named Kadat, Kadatskaya or perhaps Kadetsk, the etymological root of which is uncertainAmong the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K332]

Kalashnikov
occupationalКалашников. This surname originates from the term kalashnik, meaning a “baker” of kalach (bread loaves). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kalimanov
firstnameКалиманов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Kaliman. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalimanoff, Kalimanow, Kalimanav.  [Soundex Code K455]

Kalinin
firstnameКалинин. This surname is derived from the men’s name Kalina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K455]

Kalmykov
locationalКалмыков. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Kalmyks, a Mongol people who derived their name from the Turkic word kalmyk meaning “to remain”. It may also refer to a non-Kalmyk Russian with facial features like those of a Kalmyk. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalmakov, Kalmikov, Kolmakov, Kolmykov, Kalmokov, Kalmakoff, Kalmokoff, Kalmikoff, Kalmeikoff, Kolmokoff, Kalmykoff, Kolmakoff, Kolmakof, Kalmykow, Kalmakow, Kolmekow, Kolmikow, Kolmakow, Kalmikove, Kalmakove.  [Soundex Code K452]

Kambarov
firstnameКамбаров. This surname is derived from the Mongol-Turkic men’s name Kambar.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Persian term kambar, meaning “brown”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K516]

Kanygin
firstnameКаныгин. This patronymic surname is derived from Konyga, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kanigan, Kanegin, Kanigin, Kanegan, Konigan, Konigin, Konygin, Kanigen, Canihan, Kanigan, Kanehan, Kanechan, Kanihan, Kanechen.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kapranov
firstnameКапранов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Kapron. Note that this term also referred to a “man” or “muzhik” (peasant). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K165] 

Kaptsov
nicknameКапцов. This surname originates from the dialect term kopets, a species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kaptsoff, Kapsov, Kapsoff, Kapssof, Kapssoff.  [Soundex Code K132]

Karabanov
nicknameКарабанов. This surname is derived from the dialect term karaban, meaning “jarring” or “shocking”. Note that this term also referred to a “loaf of bread”.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term karabin, meaning “carbine” (rifle). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K615]

Karaev
nicknameКараев. This surname originates from the Turkic term kara, meaning “black” or “dark”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dark and swarthy complexion, black hair, dark clothes, or perhaps a dirty or foul-tempered individual.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Karetov
nicknameКаретов. This surname is derived from the term kareta, meaning a (horse-drawn) “carriage” or “coach”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured a carriage. lEnglish spelling variants include: Karetoff, Karitoff, Koretoff.  [Soundex Code K631]

Karev
nicknameКарев. This surname originates from the term karii, meaning “brown” or “hazel” eye colouring. Note that this term was also used in some Russian dialects to refer to someone with a brown and swarthy complexion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Karnaukhov
nicknameКарнаухов. This surname originates from the term karnaukhov, meaning “cut ear” or “mutilated ear”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Karnouhoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Karpin
firstnameКарпин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Karp. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term karp, meaning “carp” fish.  [Soundex Code K615] 

Karpov
firstnameКарпов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Karp. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term karp, meaning “carp” fish. lEnglish spelling variants include: Carpoff.  [Soundex Code K611]

Karyakin
nicknameКарякин. This surname originates from the dialect term kariaka, meaning “persistent” or “obstinate”. Note that this term also referred to a “poseur”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Karyakin, Koriakin, Koryakin, Kriakin, Karyaken, Kariaken, Emerald.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kashcheev
nicknameКащеев. This surname originates from the dialect term kashchei, meaning the “fantastic” or “immortal” person. Note that this term also referred to a “greedy” or “rich” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K221]

Kashirsky
locationalКаширский. This surname indicates a family that originated from the Russian city of Kashira, so called from the term kashira, meaning “cattle shelter”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kashirski, Kashirskii, Kashirskiy, Kashirskij, Kachirski, Kachkirisky, Kachirsky, Kashersky, Kushurski.  [Soundex Code K262] 

Kasparov
firstnameКаспаров. This patronymic surname is derived from the White Russian men’s name Kaspar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasparoff.  [Soundex Code K216]

Kastryulin
nicknameКастрюлин. This surname originates from the term kastryulya, meaning “saucepan”, a copper or iron vessel with steep sides used for cooking. his term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or perhaps used saucepans for cooking. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K236]

Kasymov
firstnameКасымов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Kasym. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasimov, Kasimoff.  [Soundex Code K251]

Kasymsky
locationalКасымский. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from a village named KasimovKasimovo or Kasimovka, so called from the Turkic men’s name Kasym. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K252]

Katasonov
locationalКатасонов. This surname indicates a family that originated from the North Caucasian town of Katason. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katasonoff, Katasanoff.  [Soundex Code K325]

Katkov
nicknameКатков. This surname originates from the term katok, meaning “roller” or “rolling-pin”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or made this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Katkoff, Kotkoff.  [Soundex Code K321]

Kazakov
locationalКазаков. This surname originates from kazak, meaning “Cossack”. The Cossacks descend from runaway Russian and Ukrainian serfs and independent Tatar groups who established free self-governing communities on the southern steppes in the 15th century. Renowned horsemen, adventurers, frontiersmen, warriors, rebels, freebooters and bandits, the Cossacks established their own independent cultural tradition and were granted special freedoms and privileges by Russian, Polish and Turkish rulers in return for military service. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kazakoff, Kasakoff.  [Soundex Code K221]

Kazeev
occupationalКазеев. This surname originates from the Turkic term kazyy, meaning a “judge”, someone who passed judgement in a court of law. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Khamzaev
firstnameХамзаев. This surname originates from the Turkic men’s name Khamza. lEnglish spelling variants include: Khamzaeff, Hamzaeff.  [Soundex Code K521]

Kharitonov
firstnameХаритонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Khariton. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K635]

Khaustov
occupationalХаустов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term fausty (borrowed from the Latin faustus, meaning “happy”) and referred to a “simple peasant” in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K231]

Khirov
nicknameХиров. This surname originates from the dialect term khira, meaning “illness”, “bad weather” or “slush”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K610]

Khiteev
nicknameХитеев. This surname originates from the dialect term khitya, meaning “misfortune”, “disaster”, or “trouble”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K310]

Khlystov
nicknameХлыстов. This surname originates from the term khlyst, meaning “whip”. Note that this term also refers to a member of the Khlysty, a religious sect that practiced self-flagellation. lEnglish spelling variants include: Khlistoff, Klystoff, Klistoff, Chylstaff, Chylstoff, Cleyssoff, Chlitows, Klestoff, Histov.  [Soundex Code K423]

Khmyrev
nicknameХмырев. This surname originates from the dialect term khmyra, meaning “crybaby”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb khmyrit’ meaning “to miss”, “to grieve” and “to pout”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code B250]

Khnykin
nicknameХныкин. This surname originates from the dialect term khnykat’ meaning “to complain” or “to sulk”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K525]

Kholodinin
nicknameХолодинин. This surname originates from the term kholodnii, meaning “cold”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Kholopov
occupationalХолопов. This surname originates from the term kholop, meaning “serf” or “slave”. Beginning in the 16th century, laws were passed in Old Russia inhibiting the free movement of the peasant tenants of feudal lords. By the 18th century, serf peasants were bound to the landowner rather than to the land, reducing their condition to virtual slavery. There were also real slaves in Old Russia. Serfdom was abolished in 1861. lEnglish spelling variants include: Halopoff, Holopoff, Chalopow.  [Soundex Code K411]

Khomutov
nicknameХомутов. This surname originates from the term khomut, meaning “collar”, “harness” or “yoke”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured such equipment. lEnglish spelling variants include: Homutoff, Homatoff, Homotoff.  [Soundex Code K531]

Khoprov
nicknameХопров. This surname originates from the term khoper, meaning “pile-driver”. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Khoper river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Haproff, Hoproff, Haprov.  [Soundex Code K161]

Khozin
occupationalХозин. This surname originates from the term khozya, meaning “owner”, “master”, “chief”, “host” or “proprietor”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Hozin, Hozen, Hazen.  [Soundex Code K250]

Khrapov
nicknameХрапов. This surname originates from the dialect term khrap, meaning “impudent” or “violent”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb khrapet’ meaning “to snore” or “to become presumptious”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K611]

Khvorostov
nicknameХворостов. This surname originates from the term khvorost, meaning “brushwood”, “underwood” or “windfall”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term khvorost’ meaning “sickliness”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K162]

Kirilov
firstnameКирилов. Kirilov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Kirill. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kiselev
nicknameКиселев. This surname originates from the term kisel’, a type of sour drink popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Keseloff, Kiseloff, Kisseloff, Kessloff, Kissel.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kislenkov
nicknameКисленков. Kislenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Kislenko. The -v suffix ending was added after its formation. It originates from the term kislii, meaning “sour”, “acid” or “tart”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K245]

Kishko
nicknameКишко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term kishka, meaning “gut” or “intestine”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K220]

Kistanov
nicknameКистанов. This surname originates from the term kisten’, meaning “bludgeon”, “club” or “cudgel”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this weapon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K235]

Klenin
nicknameКленин. This surname is derived from klen, meaning “maple tree” and may refer to someone who lived near a maple tree. It also suggested that the name can derive from Klenya, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Kleonik.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K455]

Klubnikin
nicknameКлубникин. This surname originates from the term klubnika, meaning “strawberry”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Klubnickin, Klubnicken, Klubniken, Klubnik.  [Soundex Code K415]

Knyshin
nicknameКнышин. This surname originates from the dialect term knysh, a type of baked bun or pancake with butter made in South Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K525]

Kobets
nicknameКобец. This surname derives from the term kobets, meaning “sparrow-hawk”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a hawk, perhaps a swift, rapacious or sharp-sighted individual.  [Soundex Code K132] 

Kobylov
nicknameКобылов. This surname originates from the term kobyla, meaning “mare”, a female horse. Animal nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Kobzev
nicknameКобзев. This surname originates from the term kobza, a type of round string instrument played in Old Russia. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant musician who played or manufactured the kobza. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kobsef, Kobseff, Kobzeff, Kobzoff, Kobziff.  [Soundex Code K121]

Kochergin
nicknameКочергин. This surname originates from the term kocherga, meaning “poker” or “fire-iron”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured this household item. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kochergen, Kashergen, Kachergin.  [Soundex Code K262]

Kolesnikov
occupationalКолесников. This surname originates from the term kolesnik, meaning “wheelwright”, a craftsman who made and repaired wooden wheels and wheeled vehicles such as carts, wagons, carraiges, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K425]

Kolodin
nicknameКолодин. This surname derives from the term koloda, meaning “block” or “log”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K435]

Koloskov
nicknameКолосkов. This originates from koloska, a diminutive form of the term kolos, meaning “ear” (of corn, wheat, etc). Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K421]

Kolpakov
nicknameКолпаков. This surname originates from the term kolpak, meaning “cap”. Note that this term also referred to a “sleepy fellow”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kalpakoff, Kolpakoff, Kalp.  [Soundex Code K412]

Komyagin
nicknameКомягин. This surname originates from the dialect term komyaga, meaning a type of “log boat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used such a vessel. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K525]

Konchakov
firstnameКончаков. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Konchak. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K522]

Kondakov
firstnameКондаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Kondak, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kondratii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondakoff, Kondikoff, Kundikoff.  [Soundex Code K532]

Kondaurov
nicknameКондауров. This surname originates from the dialect term kondyr’ meaning a “high collar”, “cuff” or “peak”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K536]

Kondrashev
firstnameКондрашев. This patronymic surname is derived from Kondrasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kondratii. The Kondrashovs among the Molokans resided in the Amur region of Russia prior to emigrating to America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kondrashoff, Condrashoff.  [Soundex Code K536]

Konev
nicknameКонев. This surname originates from the term kon’ meaning “horse”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Konya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Konon, Nikon and Kondratii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konnoff, Konoff.  [Soundex Code K510]

Konovalov
occupationalКоновалов. This surname originates from the term konoval, meaning “horse doctor” – someone whose trade involved the care and treatment of horses for disease and injuries, birthing and gelding. lEnglish spelling variants include: Konovaloff, Kanavalov, Kanavaloff, Kanovalov, Conovaloff, Konoloff. [Soundex Code K514]

Konstantinov
firstnameКонстантинов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Konstantin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K523]

Kopchenko
firstnameКопченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Kopka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kapiton. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kopchenka.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kopylov
nicknameКопылов. This surname originates from the dialect term kopyl‘ meaning “post”, “strut”, “staff”, “distaff” or “column”. Note that this term also refers to an “obstinate”, “proud” or “uncompromising” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Korolev
nicknameКоролев. This surname originates from the term korol, meaning “king”. It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term “king” was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koraloff.  [Soundex Code K641]

Kornev
nicknameКорнев. This surname originates from the term koren‘ meaning “root”. Note that this term also refers to an “obstinate”, “severe” or “avaricious” person. It is also suggested that the name can derive from derived from Kornei, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kornilii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kornoff, Karnoff, Korneff.  [Soundex Code K651]

Korobov
nicknameКоробов. This surname originates from the term korob, meaning “box” or “basket”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Korboff, Corboff.  [Soundex Code K611]

Korolev
nicknameКоролев. This surname originates from the term korol, meaning “king”. It is unlikely that the bearers of this surname actually descend from kings since there were never any kings in Russia, only tsars. The term “king” was known to Russians mainly from fairytales and playing cards. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was rich, worldly, happy or imperious, or it may have been given to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K641]

Korotaev
nicknameКоротаев. This surname originates from the dialect term korotai, meaning “short” or “low”. It is also suggested that the name may indicate someone from the region or tribe of the Karatai, a Tatar people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Kosarev
occupationalКосарев. This surname originates from the term kosar’ meaning “mower” or “reeper”, someone who cut hay with a scyth (kosa). lEnglish spelling variants include: Kasaroff, Kosareff, Kaseroff.  [Soundex Code K261]

Kositsin
nicknameКосицин. This surname originates from the term kositsa, meaning a small or women’s scyth (kosa). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used such a tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kocitzen, Kusitzin, Kositzin, Kositsen.  [Soundex Code K232]

Kosmynin
firstnameКосмынин. This patronymic surname is derived from Kosmynya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Kosma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kosoy
nicknameКосой. This surname originates from the term kosoy, meaning “squint-eyed” and was given to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K200]

Kostrikin
nicknameКострикин. This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Note that this term also refers to “fire” as well as a “growly” or “grumpy” person.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Kostriken.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kostryukov
nicknameКострюков. This surname originates from the dialect term kostrika, referring to the fibrous strands of flax stem from which linen is made. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose occupation was the processing of flax for the making of linen, or perhaps someone who made or wore linen clothes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K236]

Kostyuchenko
firstnameКостюченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Kostyuk, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konstantin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K232]

Kotov
nicknameКотов. This surname originates from the term kot, meaning “tom-cat”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Kotya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Konstantin. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kotoff. [Soundex Code K310]

Kovalev
occupationalКовалев. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term koval, meaning “blacksmith”, a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for blacksmith – kuznets) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K141]

Koveshnikov
occupationalКовешников. This surname originates from the term koveshnik, a master craftsman who made intricate metal casket boxes (kovtsy) for storing valuables in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K125]

Kozeev
nicknameКозеев. This surname originates from the term koza, meaning “goat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goat, perhaps a stubborn or bearded individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozeyev, Kozeff, Kozaeff, Koziev, Kizaeff.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kozlovtsev
locationalКозловцев. This surname originates from Kozlovets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Kozlovo or Kozlov in Old Russia.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K241]

Kozhevnikov
occupationalКожевников. This surname originates from the term kozhevnik, meaning “tanner”, a craftsman who tanned animal skins, hides and leathers. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K215]

Kozlov
nicknameКозлов. This surname is derived from the term kozel, meaning “billy-goat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a goat, perhaps a stubborn or bearded individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kozloff, Kozlow, Kasloff. [Soundex Code K241]

Kraichkov
locationalКрайчков. This surname originates from the dialect term kraichik, meaning “border”, “edge”, “rim” or “extremity” of a territory or thing and may refer to someone who lived near such a place. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code K622]

Krasnoslovshchikov
nicknameКраснословщиков. This surname originates from the dialect verb krasnoslovit’ meaning “to speak”. Krasnoslovshchik was the term given to a “speaker” or “phrasemonger”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kravtsov
occupationalКравцов. This surname originates from the Ukrainian term kravets, meaning “tailor” – someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. The Ukrainian root of this name (compare the Russian term for tailor – portnoi) suggests that it is either a Ukrainianized Russian or a Russianized Ukrainian surname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K613]

Krechetov
nicknameКречетов. This surname originates from krechet, meaning “gyrfalcon”, the largest species of falcon. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K623]

Kremensky
locationalКременский. This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named KremenoKremenki or Kremensk, so called from the term kremen’ meaning “flint”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K655]

Krugov
nicknameКругов. This surname originates from the term krug, meaning “circle” or “ring”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K621]

Krutiev
nicknameКрутиев. This surname originates from the dialect term kruti, meaning “twist”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an impatient, restless or fast individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Krylov
nicknameКрылов. This surname is derived from the term krylo, meaning “wing”. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and had a specific religious connotation of “angel wings”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kriloff, Kreloff.  [Soundex Code K641]

Krysin
nicknameКрысин. This surname originates from the term krysa, meaning “rat”. This term may have been given as an uncomplimentary nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K625]

Kryuchkov
nicknameКрючков. This surname originates from the term kryuchok, meaning “hook”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a crooked back or hooked nose, or perhaps a petty, captious individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K622]

Kucherov
occupationalКучеров. This surname originates from the term kucher, meaning “driver” (of a horse and carriage). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K261]

Kuchinkin
nicknameКучинкин. This surname originates from the dialect term kachinka, meaning “duck”. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Kachinka river in South Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kushinkin.  [Soundex Code K252]

Kudashin
firstnameКудашин. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic or Mordvinian men’s name Kudash. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Kudash, a diminutive form of the Russian men’s name Ankudin. [Soundex Code K325]

Kudelin
nicknameКуделин. This surname originates from the term kudel’, meaning “tow”, the course, broken hemp or flax fibre prepared for spinning into yarn.  Note that term also referred to an “idler” or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K345]

Kudinov
firstnameКудинов. This patronymic surname is derived from Kudin, a diminutive form of the men’s name Akindin.  It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Tatar term kudai, meaning “God” or “Allah”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kudenoff, Kudinoff, Kudenov.  [Soundex Code K351]

Kudryashov
nicknameКудряшов. This surname originates from the term kudryash, meaning “curly haired” and was given to someone who matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kudrashoff.  [Soundex Code K362]

Kuksov
nicknameКуксов. This surname originates from the dialect term kuksa, meaning “fist”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a strong or forceful individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K210]

Kulagin
nicknameКулагин. This surname originates from the term kulaga, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S425]

Kulikov
nicknameКуликов. This surname originates from the term kulik, meaning “woodcock” or “snipe”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a snipe, perhaps a loud or noisy individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kulikoff, Kulikow.  [Soundex Code K421] 

Kunakov
nicknameКунаков. This surname originates from the Tatar term kunak, meaning “friend”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kunakoff, Kunacoff, Kunacov, Cunakov.  [Soundex Code K521]

Kunitsyn
nicknameКуницын. This surname originates from the term kunitsa, meaning “marten”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a marten, a trapper of martens, or perhaps someone who wore a garment of marten fur. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K532]

Kurbatov
nicknameКурбатов. This surname originates from the Turkic term kurbat, meaning “short” or “fat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone of short and stocky build. lEnglish spelling variants include: Koorbatoff, Kurbatoff, Kurbatow.  [Soundex Code K613]

Kurnikov
nicknameКурников. This surname originates from the term kurnik, meaning “chicken pie”. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kurnikoff, Kurnekoff, Kurnakoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Kurnosov
nicknameКурносов. This surname is derived from the term kurnosyi, meaning “snub-nosed”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kurnosoff.  [Soundex Code K652]

Kurteev
nicknameКуртеев. This surname originates from the dialect term kurte, meaning “short”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term kurti, meaning “short jacket” or “short-tailed sheep dog”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K631]

Kutukov
nicknameКутуков. This surname originates from the Turkic term kutuk, meaning “stump”, “log” or “trunk”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K 321]

Kuz’min
firstnameКузмин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Kuzma. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code K255]

Kuznetsov
occupationalКузнецов. Kuznetsov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term kuznets, meaning “blacksmith”, a craftsman who worked iron with a forge and made iron utensils, horseshoes, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Kooznetsoff, Kooznitsoff, Kusnetsoff, Kusnetzoff, Kuznetzoff, Kuznitsoff, Kuznitzoff.  [Soundex Code K253]

– L –

Ladonin
firstnameЛадонин. This patronymic surname is derived from Ladonya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including EVirilad, Vladimir, Vladislav, Palladii and Elladii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ladonen. [Soundex Code L525]

Laktionov
firstnameЛактионов. This patronymic surname is derived from Laktion, a diminutive form of the men’s name Galaktion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lankin
firstnameЛанкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Lanka, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Evlampii, Ruslan, Svetlan and Emelian. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L525]

Lapin
nicknameЛапин. This surname is derived from the term lapa, meaning “paw” or “pad”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lapien.  [Soundex Code L150]

Laptev
nicknameЛаптев. This surname is derived from the term lapot’ meaning “bast shoe”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a peasant who wore or made bast shoes. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L131]

Larionov
firstnameЛарионов. This patronymic surname is derived from Larion, a diminutive form of the men’s name Illarion.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L651]

Lashenko
firstnameЛашенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Lasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ilarion and the women’s name Lara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lashinko.  [Soundex Code L252]

Lashin
firstnameЛашин. This patronymic surname is derived from Lasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ilarion and the women’s name Lara. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lashen.  [Soundex Code L250]

Lavov
nicknameЛавов. This surname originates from the dialect term lava, meaning “bench” or “bridge”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a workman who made such articles. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L110]

Lavrenov
firstnameЛавренов. This patronymic surname is derived from Lavrenya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lavrentii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L165]

Lazarev
firstnameЛазарев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Lazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazareff, Lazaroff, Lazeroff, Lazarow. [Soundex Code L261]

Lazev
firstnameЛазев. This patronymic surname is derived from Laza, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lazar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S210]

Lazutin
firstnameЛазутин. This patronymic surname is derived from Lazuta, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lazootin.  [Soundex Code L235]

Lebedev
nicknameЛебедев. This surname originates from the term lebed, meaning “swan”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a swan, perhaps a graceful, pure or beautiful individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lebedoff, Lebedeff, Lebedow.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lebeshev
nicknameЛебешев. This surname originates from lebesh, which is probably a corruption of the term lobash, meaning “high-browed”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L121]

Leksin
firstnameЛексин. This patronymic surname is derived from Leksa, a diminutive form of the men’s names Alexei and Alexander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lexin.  [Soundex Code L250]

Ledyaev
firstnameЛедяев. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Ledyai. lEnglish spelling variants include: Ledieff, Lediaev, Lediaeff, Lidyoff, Ladiayoff, Lydoff.  [Soundex Code L310]

Legenko
nicknameЛегенко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the dialect term lega, meaning “thief”, “sluggard” or “idler”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L252]

Lelikov
firstnameЛеликов. This patronymic surname is derived from Lelik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Aleksander. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lelikoff.  [Soundex Code L421]

Leonov
firstnameЛеонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Leon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L510]

Leontiev
firstnameЛеонтиев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Leontii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Leontieff.  [Soundex Code L531]

Lepekhin
nicknameЛепехин. This surname originates from the term lepekha, meaning “pancake” or “flat cake”. Note that this term also referred to a “slow, portly person”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L125]

Leshtaev
nicknameЛештаев. This surname originates from the Turkic term leshta, meaning “lentil”. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L231]

Letunov
nicknameЛетунов. This surname originates from the dialect term letun, meaning “flying” or “one who flies”. Note that this term also referred to an evil fairytale spirit of the air. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L351]

Levashov
firstnameЛевашов. This patronymic surname is derived from Levash, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lev. It is also suggested that the name can derive from derived from the term levsha, meaning “left-handed”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Levashoff.  [Soundex Code L121]

Lezin
nicknameЛезин. This surname originates from the term leza, meaning a “dexterous”, “nimble” or “brisk” person. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L250]

Lipatov
firstnameЛипатов. This surname is derived from Lipatii, a diminutive form of the men’s name Ipatii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L131]

Lisitsyn
nicknameЛисицын. This surname originates from the term lisitsa, meaning “fox”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a fox, perhaps a swift or cunning individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lisizin.  [Soundex Code L232] 

Lobachev
nicknameЛобачев. This surname originates from the dialect term lobach, meaning “high-browed”. This term also referred to a “head wind” bringing opposite weather. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L121]

Login
firstnameЛогин. This surname is derived from Loga, a diminutive form of the men’s names Evlogii, Longin and Filolog and the women’s name Longina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Logutov
firstnameЛогутов. This patronymic surname is derived from Loguta, a diminutive form of the men’s name Loggin. lEnglish spelling variants include: Logutoff, Logotoff, Lugotoff, Lugutoff, Lugatoff.  [Soundex Code L 231]

Lomakin
nicknameЛомакин. This surname originates from the term lomaka, meaning “one who breaks” or “forces oneself to persuade”. Note that this term also referred to a “stick”. fox”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L525]

Losev
nicknameЛосев. This surname is derived from the term los’ meaning “elk”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled an elk in some respect. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L210]

Loskutov
nicknameЛоскутов. This surname is derived from the term loskut, meaning “shred”, “scrap” or “rag”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Loscutoff, Loscotoff, Loskutoff, Loskutow, Laskutoff.  [Soundex Code L 231]

Lukin
nicknameЛукин. This surname originates from the term luka, meaning “onion”. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Luka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lukyan. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L250]

Luk’yanov
firstnameЛукьянов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Lukyan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lukianoff, Lukanoff.  [Soundex Code L251]

Luponosov
nicknameЛупоносов. This surname is derived from the verb lupit’ (“to peel”) + nos (“nose”), meaning “peel the nose”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term luponoska, a type of wild duck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code L152]

Lysov
nicknameЛысов. This surname originates from the term lyso, meaning “bald”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this physical description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code L210]

Lyubashev
firstnameЛюбашев. This patronymic surname is derived from Lyubasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Lybov. lEnglish spelling variants include: Lubashoff, Lebeshov, Lebeshof, Lebachoff.  [Soundex Code L121]

Makarin
firstnameМакарин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Makar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M265]

Makarov
firstnameМакаров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Makar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makaroff, Makareff.  [Soundex Code M261]

Makashev
firstnameМакашев. This patronymic surname is derived from Makasha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Makar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M221]

Makhnev
firstnameМахнев. This patronymic surname is derived from Makhno, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Epimakh, Makar and Matvei. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Maksimov
firstnameМаксимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Maksim. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M251]

Malafei
firstnameМалафей. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Malafei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Malofy.  [Soundex Code M 410]

Malash
firstnameМалаш. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Malash, a diminutive form of the men’s name Malakhii and the women’s name Malanya.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M420]

Malashikhin
firstnameМалашихин. This patronymic surname is derived from Malashikha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Malakhii and the women’s name Malanya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M422]

Malin
nicknameМалин. This surname originates from the term malyi, meaning “small”. This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M450]

Maloletkin
nicknameМалолеткин. This surname originates from the dialect term maloletok, meaning “youth” or “adolescent”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a young man or to a young soldier. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M443]

Malyshev
nicknameМалышев. This surname originates from malysh, meaning “baby”, “tot” or “infant”. This nickname was often given to a child that matched this physical description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M421]

Mal’tsev
nicknameМальцев. This surname originates from malets, a diminutive form of the term malo, meaning “small”. This nickname was often given to the smallest or youngest child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Maltsoff, Maltseff.  [Soundex Code M432]

Mamontov
nicknameМамонтов. This surname originates from the term mamont, meaning “mammoth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a large, awkward or hulking individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M553]

Markov
firstnameМарков. Markov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Mark. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M621]

Markushin
firstnameМаркушин. This patronymic surname is derived from Markusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mark.  [Soundex Code M622]

Mashanov
firstnameМашанов. This matronymic surname is derived from Mashanya, a diminutive form of the women’s name Maria. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M251]

Maslov
nicknameМаслов. This surname originates from the term maslo, meaning “butter” or “oil”. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Matroshin
firstnameМатрошин. This matronymic surname is derived from Matrosha, a diminutive form of the women’s name Matrona. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M362]

Matveev
firstnameМатвеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Matvey. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M311]

Mazaev
nicknameМазаев. This surname originates from the verb mazat’, meaning “to daub”, “to smear” or “to grease”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M210] 

Mechnev
nicknameМечнев. This surname originates from the Old Russian term mechnyi, meaning (of or relating to) a “sword”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Matchniff, Matchn. [Soundex Code M251]

Mechnikov
occupationalМечников. This surname originates from the term mechnik, meaning “swordsman” – a soldier armed with a sword (mech). Note that this term also referred to an “executioner”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mechnikoff, Mechnekoff.  [Soundex Code M252]

Mel’nikov
occupationalМельников. This surname originates from the term mel’nik, meaning “miller” – someone who owned or operated a mill for grinding grain into flour or meal. lEnglish spelling variants include: Melnikoff, Malnikoff.  [Soundex Code M452] 

Merkulov
firstnameМеркулов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Merkul. lEnglish spelling variants include: Merkuloff.  [Soundex Code M624]

Meshalkin
nicknameМешалкин. This surname originates from the term meshalka, meaning “poker”, “mixer” or “stirrer”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M242]

Meshcheryakov
locationalМещеряков. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Meshcheryak, a Turkic people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M226]

Metelkin
nicknameМетелкин. This surname originates from the term metelka, meaning “broom” or “whisk”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used this tool. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M342]

Metelnikov
occupationalМетелников. This surname originates from the term metel’nik, meaning “sweeper” – someone whose work or occupation involved sweeping dirt, snow etc with a broom. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M345]

Metchikov
nicknameМетчиков. This surname originates from the term metchik, meaning “tap” or “screw-tap”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used this tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Metchikoff, Metchkoff, Metchekoff, Mitchikoff, Mechekoff, Mechikoff, Michikoff, Metchkow, Mechikow.  [Soundex Code M322]

Mikhailov
firstnameМихаилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Mikhailo. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code M241]

Miloserdov
nicknameМилосердов. This surname is derived from the term miloserdie, meaning “compassion”, “mercy” or “grace”. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy. lEnglish spelling variants include: Miloserdoff, Melosardoff, Meloserdoff.  [Soundex Code M426]

Milyaev
firstnameМиляев. This surname is derived from Milya, a diminutive form of the men’s names Emel’yan, Meletii, Meliton and Milii and the women’s names Gemella, Emiliana, Kamilla, Lyudmila, Melaniya, Melitina, Militsa and Miliya. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Milyai, a diminutive form of the men’s name Milii.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M410]

Minakov
firstnameМинаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Minak, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Minasuev
firstnameМинасyeв. This patronymic surname is derived from Minas, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mina. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M521]

Mindrin
locationalМиндрин. This surname originates from the dialect term mindara or myndra, meaning “Swede” and indicates an ancestor who originated from Sweden. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mendrin, Mendren.  [Soundex Code M536]

Mironov
firstnameМиронов. This patronymic surname is derived the men’s name Miron. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M651]

Mishin
firstnameМишин. This patronymic surname is derived from Misha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Mikhailo.  [Soundex Code M250]

Mitrenko
firstnameМитренко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Mitra, a diminutive form of the men’s names Dmitry and Mitrofan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Metrenko, Mitrenkov, Metrenkov, Mitrenkoff, Metrenkoff, Metrinkoff.  [Soundex Code M365]

Moiseev
firstnameМоисеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Moisei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Moisoff, Moiseff, Mosiev, Moiseve, Moiseyev, Moisev, MoiseiffMoisser.  [Soundex Code M210]

Mokhov
nicknameМохов. This surname originates from the term mokh, meaning “moss” or “lichen”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Mokhoff, Mokoff, Mohoff.  [Soundex Code M210]

Mokshanov
locationalМокшанов. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Moksha, a Mordvinian people. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the Moksha river in Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Makshanoff, Mackshanov, Mackshanoff, Mackshinoff, Makshanov, Mokshanow, Mokshinoff.  [Soundex Code M251]

Molodchenkov
nicknameМолодченков, Молодченко. Molodchenkov is a Russianization of the Ukrainian surname Molodchenko. The -v suffix ending was added after its formation. It originates from the term molodka, meaning “pullet”, a young female chicken. Animal nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M432]

Molokanov
nicknameМолоканов. This uniquely Molokan surname originates from the name of the sect, from molokan, meaning “milk-drinker”. It may have been adopted by a member of the Molokan sect or given as a nickname to a non-Molokan Russian who originated from an area dominated by the sect. lEnglish spelling variants include: Molokanoff, Malakanov, Malakanow, Molokan.  [Soundex Code M425]

Molostnov
nicknameМолостнов. This surname originates from the dialect term molost’ meaning “bad weather” or “wet weather”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M423]

Mordovin
locationalМордовин. This surname originates from the term mordva, and refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Mordvinov
locationalМордвинов. This surname refers to someone from the region or tribe of the Mordvin people. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M631]

Morozov
nicknameМорозов. Morozov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term moroz, meaning “frost” or “cold”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or cold, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Morozoff, Morzov, Morozow. [Soundex Code M621]

Moskalev
locationalМоскалев. This surname originates from the moskal’, the nickname for a Russian living in Ukraine during pre-revolutionary times.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M241]

Motylev
nicknameМотылев. This surname is derived from the term motylka, meaning “butterfly”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M341]

Mudrov
nicknameМудров. This surname originates from the term mudrii, meaning “wise”, “sage”, “intelligent”, “prudent” and “clever”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code M361]

Murav’ev
nicknameМуравьев. This surname originates from the term muravei, meaning “ant”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Muraviov, Moroviov.  [Soundex Code M611] 

Muravlev
nicknameМуравлев. This surname originates from the dialect term muravl’, meaning “ant”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code M611] 

– 

– N –

Natarov
nicknameНатаров. This surname is derived from the dialect verb natarivat‘ meaning “to leave tracks” or “to lay a path”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nataroff.  [Soundex Code N361]

Naumov
firstnameНаумов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Naum. lEnglish spelling variants include: Namoff.  [Soundex Code N510]

Nazarov
firstnameНазаров. Nazarov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Nazar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nazaroff, Nasaroff, Nazarow.  [Soundex Code N261]

Nechaev
nicknameНечаев. This surname is derived from the term nechai, meaning “one who is not expected”. This term may have been given by parents to an unexpected child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N210]

Nemakin
locationalНемакин. This surname originates from the term nemka, meaning a “German” woman. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N525]

Nekhoroshev
nicknameНехорошев. This surname is derived from the term ne (“no”) + khoroshii (“good”) meaning “no good”. This term may have been given as a pejorative nickname or by superstitious parents to a child in order to trick fate into refraining from cursing the child out of spite or envy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N262]

Nemanikhin
nicknameНеманихин. This surname is derived from the term ne (“not”) + manikha (“tempter” or “deceiver”) meaning “one who does not deceive”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest, straightforward, upright, trustworthy person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N552]

Nemtsev
locationalНемцев. This surname originates from the term nemets, meaning “German” and indicates an ancestor who originated from Germany. lEnglish spelling variants include: Nemsoff.  [Soundex Code N532]

Nestorenko
firstnameНесторенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Nestor.  [Soundex Code N236]

Neudakhin
nicknameНеудахин. This surname originates from the dialect term neudakha, meaning an “unsuccessful”, “unlucky” or “failure” of a person. This term may have been given as a pejorative nickname or by superstitious parents to a child in order to trick fate into refraining from cursing the child out of spite or envy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N325]

Neverov
nicknameНеверов. This surname originates from the term never, meaning “non-believer” or “infidel”. This nickname was given to those who refused to accept the Russian Orthodox faith, especially non-Christians and non-Russians such as Turks, Tatars, Mordvins, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Neveroff, Nevaroff, Nevarov.  [Soundex Code N161]

Nevskov
locationalНевсков (Невский). This name is properly Nevsky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. It indicates a family that originated from the Neva River in northwestern Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N121]

Nikitin
firstnameНикитин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Nikita. [Soundex Code N235]

Nikol’sky
locationalНикольский. This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named Nikol’skNikol’skoye or Nikolka, so called from the men’s name Nikolai. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N242]

Nogov
nicknameНогов. This surname originates from the term noga, meaning “leg” or “foot”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N210]

Norov
nicknameНоров. This surname is derived from the term nora, meaning “burrow”, “hole” or “lair”. no good”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Nora, a diminutive form of the men’s names Vianor and Nikanor and the women’s names Minodora, Noyabrina and Eleanora. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N610]

Novikov
nicknameНовиков. This surname originates from the term novik, meaning “novice”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an amateur or novice. lEnglish spelling variants include: Novikoff, Novikow, Novekov, Novekoff, Novakoff, Novak.  [Soundex Code N121]

Novosel’tsev
locationalНовосельцев. This surname originates from the term novoselets, meaning “new settler” and refers to a newcomer to a locality. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code N 124]

Nozhin
nicknameНожин. This surname originates from the term nozh, meaning “knife”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who used or manufactured knives. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code N250]

Nozhkin
nicknameНожкин. This surname originates from the term nozhki, meaning “small feet” or “small legs”, and was given to someone who matched this physical description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Noshkin.  [Soundex Code N225]

– O –

Ochnev
nicknameОчнев. This surname is derived from the term ochnoi, meaning “eye” or “ocular”.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O251]

Odinokin
nicknameОдинокин. This surname originates from the term odinokii, meaning “alone”, “single”, “solitary” or “lonely”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Odnakin.  [Soundex Code O352]

Odnov
nicknameОднов. This surname originates from the term odno, meaning “one”, “single” or “sole”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an only child. lEnglish spelling variants include: Odnoff, Adnoff, Ednoff.  [Soundex Code O351]

Ogol’tsov
nicknameОгольцов. This surname originates from the term ogolets, meaning “sea roach”. Note that this term also refers to a “romp”, a rough, lively play. lEnglish spelling variants include: Agal’tsov, Ogoltsov, Agalsoff, Agalzoff, Agalzov.  [Soundex Code O243]

Okhotnikov
occupationalОхотников. This surname originates from the term okhotnik, meaning “hunter”, “fowler” or “sportsman”. Note that this term also refers to a “volunteer” or “amateur”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Akhotnikoff, Akotnekoff, Akhotnekoff.  [Soundex Code O235]

Oparin
nicknameОпарин. This surname originates from the term opara, meaning a “dough rising on yeast”. Note that this term also referred to a “full” or “bloated” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O165]

Orlov
nicknameОрлов. This surname originates from the term orel, meaning “eagle”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a eagle, perhaps a swift, rapacious or sharp-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Orloff, Eagles.  [Soundex Code O641]

Osipov
firstnameОсипов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Osip. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code O211]

– P –

Pakhomov
firstnameПахомов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Pakhom. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pakhomoff, Pahomoff, Pohomoff.  [Soundex Code P251]

Panferov
firstnameПанферов. This patronymic surname is derived from Panfer, a diminutive form of the men’s name Parfen. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P516]

Panin
firstnameПанин. This patronymic surname is derived from Panya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Pavel, Panteleimon and Polien. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P550]

Pankratov
firstnameПанкратов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Pankrat. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P526]

Parshin
firstnameПаршин. This patronymic surname is derived from Parsha, a diminutive form of the men’s names Parfen, Paramon, Parmen. It is also suggested the name can derive from the dialect term parsha, meaning “gudgeon” (fish). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Paskonin
firstnameПасконин. This patronymic surname is derived from Paskonya, a diminutive form of the men’s names Paisii, Pasikrat, Passarion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P255]

Patov
firstnameПатов. This surname is derived from Pata, a diminutive form of the men’s names Ipatii, Patrikii, Patrokl, Sosipatr and Spartak and the women’s names Kleopatra, Patrikiya and Sosipatra. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P310]

Pavlov
firstnameПавлов. Pavlov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is derived from Pavlo, a diminutive form of the men’s name Pavel. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pavloff, Paveloff, Pabloff, Pablov. [Soundex Code P141]

Peresedov
nicknameПереседов. This surname originates from the Old Russian verb peresedat’ meaning “to transplant”, “to replant” or “to graft”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P623]

Petakov
firstnameПетаков. This patronymic surname is derived from Petak, a diminutive form of the men’s name Petr. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petakoff. [Soundex Code P321]

Petrov
firstnameПетров. Petrov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Petr. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petroff, Petrow.  [Soundex Code P361]

Petrushkin
firstnameПетрушкин. This patronymic surname is derived from Petrushka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Petr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term petrushka, meaning “parsley”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Petrooshkin, Patruskin.  [Soundex Code P362]

Pichugin
nicknameПичугин. This surname originates from the term pichuga, meaning “small bird” or “birdie”. This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P225]

Pigarev
nicknameПигарев. This surname originates from the dialect term pigar’ meaning a diving, crested bird. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P261]

Pimenov
firstnameПименов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Pimen. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Pivovarov
occupationalПивоваров. This surname originates from the term pivovar, meaning “brewer” – someone whose trade was brewing beer (pivo), ale, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pivovaroff, Pivavaroff, Pivovorof, Povovarof, Pivaroff.  [Soundex Code P116] 

Plotnikov
occupationalПлотников. This surname originates from the term plotnik, meaning “carpenter”, a craftsman whose work was building with wood. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P435]

Pluzhnikov
occupationalПлужников. This surname originates from the term pluzhnik, meaning “ploughman”, a peasant who worked with a plough (plug). lEnglish spelling variants include: Plujnikoff, Plujnkoff, Pluschnikow, Pluss.  [Soundex Code P425]

Podgorelov
nicknameПодгорелов. This surname originates from the term podgorel, meaning “slightly burned”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who somehow matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P326]

Podgornov
locationalПодгорнов. This surname originates from the term pod (“under”) + gor (“mountain”) and refers to someone who lived below a large hill or mountain. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podgornoff.  [Soundex Code P326]

Podkovyrov
nicknameПодковыров. This surname originates from the verb podkovyryat’, meaning “to pick on”, “to tease” or “to undermine”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P321] 

Podomarev
occupationalПодомарев. This surname is derived from podomar, meaning “sexton”, an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P356]

Podosin
nicknameПодосин. This surname originates from the term pod (“under”) + osen (“autumn”) and may refer to a child born in autumn. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code P325]

Podosinnikov
nicknameПодосинников. This surname originates from the dialect term podosinnik, a type of wild mushroom in Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P325]

Podsakov
nicknameПодсаков. This surname originates from the term podsak, a hoop-net on a long staff used by fishermen in Old Russia to catch fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who manufactured or used this tool. lEnglish spelling variants include: Podsakoff, Podsiekoff, Podsekoff.  [Soundex Code P322]

Poletov
nicknameПолетов. This surname originates from the dialect term poletai, meaning “flying”, “fast” or “quick”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P431]

Polstov
nicknameПолстов. This surname originates from the term polst‘ meaning “felt”, “layer”, “cloth” or “rag”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Polstoff, Spolsdoff.  [Soundex Code P423]

Polyanin
firstnameПолянин. This matronymic surname is derived from Polyana, a diminutive form of the women’s names Polina and Apollinariya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Polanin, Planin. [Soundex Code P455]

Pominov
nicknameПоминов. This surname originates from the term pomin, meaning “mention” or “remembrance”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone in remembrance of some person or event. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P551]

Ponomarev
occupationalПономарев. This surname originates from the term ponomar, meaning “sexton”, an ecclesiastical official who took care of the Russian Orthodox church building, dug graves, rang the bell, etc. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P556]

Popin
occupationalПопин. This surname originates from the term pop, meaning a Russian Orthodox “priest”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Papen, Pappin, Papin, Poppin.  [Soundex Code P150]

Popkov
occupationalПопков. This surname originates from the dialect term popko, meaning a Russian Orthodox “priest”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P121]

Popov
occupationalПопов. Popov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term pop, a Russian Orthodox “priest”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Popoff, Popove, Papove, Papov, Papoff, Popow.  [Soundex Code P110]

Poroshin
nicknameПорошин. This surname originates from the term porosh, meaning “newly fallen snow” or “grain of powder”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child whose birth was marked by a snowfall. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P625]

Portnov
occupationalПортнов. This surname originates from the term portnoi, meaning “tailor” – someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes. lEnglish spelling variants include: Portnoff, Partnof, Partnoff, Partnov.  [Soundex Code P635] 

Potapov
firstnameПотапов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Potap. lEnglish spelling variants include: Potapoff, Potopoff, Potapow, Potopov, Patapov, Patopoff, Patapoff.  [Soundex Code P311]

Poteshnichenko
nicknameПотешниченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term poteshnik, meaning “one who amuses”. This term was given as a nickname to someone whose behavior or personality matched this description.  [Soundex Code P325] 

Potryasov
nicknameПотрясов. This surname originates from the verb potryasat’ meaning “to shake”, “to jolt”, “to trouble” or “to disturb”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P362]

Pravdin
nicknameПравдин. This surname originates from the term pravda, meaning “truth”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an honest or fair person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P613]

Pribylev
nicknameПрибылев. This surname is derived from the term pribyloi, meaning “newcomer”, “arrival”, “visitor” or “new issue”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a newborn child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P614]

Primakov
nicknameПримаков. This surname is derived from the term primak, meaning the son-in-law accepted into the household of the father-in-law.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a person who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P652]

Prokhanov
firstnameПроханов. This patronymic surname is derived from Prokhan, a diminutive form of the men’s name Prokhor. [Soundex Code P625]

Prokhorov
firstnameПрохоров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Prokhor. lEnglish spelling variants include: Prohoroff, Prohroff, Prohoff, Prohov.  [Soundex Code P626]

Prokof’ev
firstnameПрокофьев. This patronymic surname is derived from Prokofy, a diminutive form of the men’s name Prokopy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P621]

Proskudin
firstnameПроскудин. This matronymic surname is derived from the women’s name Proskudiya. lEnglish spelling variants include: Proscudin, Prascudin, Proscudine.  [Soundex Code P623]

Pudov
firstnameПудов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Pud. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term pud, a unit of measure used in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Padoff, Pudoff.  [Soundex Code P310]

Pushkarev
occupationalПушкарев. This surname originates from the term pushkar, meaning “gunner” – an artillery soldier dealing with heavy and mounted cannons, guns, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Pushkarow.  [Soundex Code P226] 

Puzanov
nicknameПузанов. This surname originates from the dialect term puzan, meaning “big-bellied” or “fat”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P251]

Puzikov
nicknameПузиков. This surname originates from the dialect term puzik, meaning “big-bellied”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code P221]

– R –

Radchenko
firstnameРадченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from from Radka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Rada or Rodion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R325]

Radiontsev
firstnameРадионцев. This surname originates from Radionets, a diminutive form of the men’s name Rodion.  This term may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Radionka or Radionovo in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R353]

Rakhmanov
nicknameРахманов. This is a Russianized Turkic surname derived from the term Rakhman, meaning “The Compassionate” – one of the Turkic names of God. Surnames of this type were frequently borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R255]

Rakov
nicknameРаков. This surname originates from the term rak, meaning “crab” or “crawfish”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R210]

Rassokhin
locationalРассохин. This surname originates from the term rassokha, meaning “fork” and refers to someone who lived near the fork of a road or a river. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rassokin, Rassikin.  [Soundex Code R225]

Razumov
nicknameРазумов. This surname originates from the term razum, meaning “reason”, “sense” or “intellect”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a clever, sensible, judicious or quick-witted individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R251]

Razvalyaev
nicknameРазваляев. This surname originates from the verb razvalyat’, meaning “to pull down”, “to roll” or “to crush”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Razvaliaeff.  [Soundex Code R214] 

Remezov
nicknameРемезов. This surname originates from the term remez, meaning “tomtit” or “wren”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an wren, perhaps an industrious, talkative or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Remezoff, Ramzoff.  [Soundex Code R521]

Reshetov
nicknameРешетов. This surname originates from the term resheto, meaning “sieve” or “screen”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Reshatoff.  [Soundex Code R231] 

Rodionov
firstnameРодионов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Rodion. lEnglish spelling variants include: Radinoff.  [Soundex Code R351]

Rogov
nicknameРогов. This surname originates from the term rog, meaning “horn” or “antler”. Note that this term also refers to any musical instrument resembling a horn in shape and sounded by blowing into the smaller end. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rogoff.  [Soundex Code R210]

Romanenko
firstnameРоманенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Roman. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R555]

Romanov
firstnameРоманов. Romanov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Roman. lEnglish spelling variants include: Romanoff. [Soundex Code R551]

Rozanov
nicknameРозанов. This surname originates from the term roza, meaning “flower”. This surname was frequently given to Russian Orthodox clergy and seminary students. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Rudakov
nicknameРудаков. This surname originates from the term rudak, meaning “red” or “ochre-colored”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color or complexion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code R321]

Rudenko
nicknameРуденко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the term ruda, meaning “ochre-colored”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. lEnglish spelling variants include: Roudenko.  [Soundex Code R352]

Rudometkin
occupationalРудометкин. This surname originates from the term rudometka, meaning a female “blood-letter”. The letting of blood by opening a vein or the application of leeches was a common remedy for all manner of illness and disease in Old Russia. Note that this surname was borne by Maxim Rudometkin, co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rudametkin, Ruddy.  [Soundex Code R353] 

Rusakov
nicknameРусаков.  This surname originates from rusak, an Old Russian term for a fair-haired person.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

Ryashentsev
locationalРяшенцев. This surname originates from Ryashenets, the name given to an inhabitant of the Russian city of Ryazhska, south of Moscow . Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R253]

Ryazanov
locationalРязанов. This surname indicates a family that originated from Riazan province, south-east of Moscow. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R251]

Ryl’kov
nicknameРыльков. This surname originates from the term rylo, meaning “face”, “mug”, “muzzle” or “snout”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a prominent face, mouth or nose. lEnglish spelling variants include: Rilkoff, Reilkoff, Rielkoff, Relkov, Rilcof, Relkoff, Rilcoff, Rilkov.  [Soundex Code R421]

Ryzhkov
nicknameРыжков. This surname originates from the term ryzhko, meaning “red”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with reddish hair color. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code R221]

– S –

Sachkov
nicknameСачков. This surname originates from the term sachok, meaning “net”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a net-maker or perhaps a hunter, fisherman or other user of nets. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sadovnikov
occupationalСадовников. This surname originates from the term sadovnik, meaning “gardener”, a person engaged in the craft of gardening. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Sakharov
nicknameСахаров. This surname originates from the term sakhar, meaning “sugar” or “sweet”. This term may have been given as an affectionate nickname. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S261]

Salamatin
nicknameСаламатин. This surname originates from the term salamata, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S453]

Saltykov
nicknameСалтыков. This surname is derived from the Turkic term saltyk, meaning “sold”. Surnames of this type were typically borne by the descendants of Tatar nobles who transfered their allegiance to the Russian Tsars during the 15th and 16th centuries. lEnglish spelling variants include: Saltikoff, Saltikov, Saltekoff, Soltikoff.  [Soundex Code S432]

Samarin
locationalСамарин. This surname indicates a family that originated from Samara province, east of Moscow. Note that this surname was borne by Molokan writer and organizer Ivan Samarin (1857-1948). lEnglish spelling variants include: Samaroff. [Soundex Code S565] 

Samodurov
nicknameСамодуров. This surname originates from the term samodur, meaning “petty tyrant”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a stubborn or obstinate individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samaduroff, Samoduroff, Somaduroff.  [Soundex Code S536]

Samokhin
firstnameСамохин. This patronymic surname is derived from Samokha, a diminutive form of the men’s names Samei, Samon and Samuil. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Samokhvalov
nicknameСамохвалов. This surname is derived from the term samo (“one’s self”) + the verb khvalit’ (“to praise”) meaning “one who gives praise to one’s self”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a boastful or arrogant individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S521]

Samov
firstnameСамов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Samei. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term sam, meaning “one’s self”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Samoff.  [Soundex Code S510]

Samsonov
firstnameСамсонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Samson. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Sandykov
nicknameСандыков. This surname is derived from the Turkic term sandyk, meaning “chest” or “box”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S532]

Sanov
firstnameСанов. This patronymic surname is derived from Sana, a diminutive form of the men’s names Alexander and Disan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sanoff.  [Soundex Code S510]

Sautin
firstnameСаутин. This patronymic surname is derived from Sauta, a diminutive form of the men’s name Savva. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term sautka, meaning “duck”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sauten, Saootin. [Soundex Code S350]

Savchenko
firstnameСавченко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Savka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Savva and Savely. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

Savel’ev
firstnameСавельев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Savely. lEnglish spelling variants include: Saveliff. [Soundex Code S141]

Savinov
firstnameСавинов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Savin. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S151]

Sayapin 
 nicknameСаяпин. The etymology of this surname is difficult to determine. It is possible that it is derived from the dialect verb tsyapati, meaning “to drip” or “to trickle”. It is also possible that the root of the name, Sayapa or perhaps Syapa, is a rare diminutive form of some men’s name such as SapronSavely, etc. lEnglish spelling variants include: Siapin, Syapin, Seapin, Seaking.  [Soundex Code S150]

Sedoikin 
 nicknameСедоикин. This surname originates from the term sedoi, meaning “grey” and may refer to someone with grey hair or eyes. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Mordvinian men’s name Sedoi. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S325]

Seleznev
nicknameСелезнев. This surname originates from the term selezen‘ meaning “drake” (a male duck). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a duck. lEnglish spelling variants include: Seleznoff, Siliznoff.  [Soundex Code S425]

Seliverstov
firstnameСеливерстов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Seliverst. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S416]

Semenikhin
firstnameСеменихин. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenikha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenishchev
firstnameСеменищев. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenische, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenkov
firstnameСеменков. This patronymic surname is derived from Semenka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S552]

Semenov
firstnameСеменов. Semenov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Semyon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Semenoff, Simenoff, Seminoff, Siminoff, Simonoff.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semenovich
firstnameСеменович. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Semyon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S551]

Semiletov
nicknameСемилетов. This surname originates from the term semiletnii, meaning “seven years”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a seven year-old child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S543]

Sergeev
firstnameСергеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sergei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Serguiff, Sergeiff.  [Soundex Code S621]

Seryaev
firstnameСеряев. This patronymic surname is derived from Serya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sergei.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S610]

Shabalin
nicknameШабалин. This surname originates from the dialect term shabala, meaning “rags”, “scraps” or “lumps”. Note that this term also referred to a “talker” or “loafer”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shabalen.  [Soundex Code S145]

Shaposhnikov
occupationalШапошников. This surname originates from the term shaposhnik, meaning “hatter”, a craftsman who manufactured, sold or cleaned hats and headwear. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S125]

Shashkin
nicknameШашкин. This surname originates from the term shashka, meaning “draughts”, an ancient Russian board game. Note that this term also referred to a “Caucasian sabre”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Shashko, a diminutive form of the men’s name Alexander. Soundex Code S225]

Shchegolev
nicknameЩеголев, Щеглов. This surname originates from the nickname shchegol, meaning “foppish”, “elegant”, “dandy”, “smart” and “boastful”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose personality matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S224]

Shcherbakov
nicknameЩербаков. Shcherbakov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term shcherbak, meaning “pock-marked” or “gap-toothed”. Note that this term also referred to a “userer”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Scherbakoff, Shcherbakoff, Scherbekoff, Sherbakoff, Sherbakov, Sherr.  [Soundex Code S261; S612]

Shchetinin
nicknameЩетинин. This surname is derived from the term shchetina meaning “bristle”. Note that this term also referred to a “bristly” or “abrupt” person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Schetinin, Schetinen, Scheetinin, Shetinin.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shchetinkin
nicknameЩетинкин. This surname is derived from the term shchetinka meaning “bristle”. Note that this term also referred to a “bristly” or “abrupt” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shchukin
nicknameЩукин. This surname originates from the term shchuka, meaning “pike” fish. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a pike. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shukin, Shuken.  [Soundex Code S250]

Shepelev
nicknameШепелев. This surname originates from the dialect term shepel, meaning an “iron shovel” used to clear stumps after a fire.  The term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used this implement. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S141]

Shestenko
nicknameШестенко. This Ukrainian surname originates from the term shest’ meaning “six”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the sixth child in a family. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shesenko.  [Soundex Code S235]

Shinin
nicknameШинин. This surname originates from the dialect term shina, meaning “trunk”. Note that this term also referred to a “rail”, “iron bar”, “hoop” or “wheel band”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shinen, Shenin. [Soundex Code S550]

Shishlinov
nicknameШишлинов. This name is properly Shishlin. The -ov suffix ending was added after the surname was originally formed. It originates from the verb shishlyat’, meaning “to dig” or “to delay”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Shishlyannikov
occupationalШишлянников. This surname originates from the dialect term shishlyannik, meaning “digger”, a laborer who digs. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Shitukhin
nicknameШитухин. This surname originates from the dialect term shitukha, meaning a type of “decked boat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a maker or perhaps sailor of such a boat. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shetukin, Shetuchin, Shetookin.  [Soundex Code S325]

Shmakov
nicknameШмаков. This surname originates from the dialect term shmak, meaning “tasty”. Note that this dialect term also referred to a funnel with a trench used by smiths for casting metal. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shmakoff.  [Soundex Code S521]

Shmelev
nicknameШмелев. This surname is derived from the term shmel’ meaning “bumblebee”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a busy, hard-working or buzzing individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S541]

Shnyakin
nicknameШнякин. This surname originates from the dialect term shnyaka, meaning “sea boat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or used such a vessel. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S525]

Shubin
nicknameШубин. This surname originates from the term shuba, meaning “fur coat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a shuba, or perhaps a maker of such garments. Shubin is the most common Molokan surname in America. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shuben, Schubin.  [Soundex Code S150]

Shutov
occupationalШутов. This surname originates from the term shut, meaning “clown”, “jester” or “fool”. Note that this term also referred to an evil fairytale spirit. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shutoff, Chutoff.  [Soundex Code S310]

Shvetsov
occupationalШвецов. This surname originates from the dialect term shvets, meaning “tailor” – someone whose trade was making or repairing clothes.  Note that this surname was borne by S. A. Shvetsov, leader of the Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the late 18th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Shvetsoff.  [Soundex Code S132]

Sidortsev
firstnameСидорцев. This patronymic surname is derived from Sidorets, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sidor. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S363]

Sirotov
nicknameСиротов. This surname is derived from the term sirota, meaning “orphan”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S631]

Skorodumov
nicknameСкородумов. This surname originates from the dialect term skorodum, meaning “resolute” or “resourceful”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S635]

Skorokhodov
occupationalСкороходов. This surname originates from the term skorokhod, meaning “fast walker”, “courier” or “foot-messenger”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S623]

Skrinkov
nicknameСкринков. This surname originates from the dialect term skrinka, meaning “chest” or “box”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term skrynnik, meaning “chest-maker”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Scrinkov.  [Soundex Code S652]

Slavin
firstnameСлавин. This patronymic surname is derived from Slava, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vacheslav. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term slava, meaning “glory”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slaven, Slevin.  [Soundex Code S415]

Slepnikov
nicknameСлепников. This surname originates from the term slepnik, meaning “blind person”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who was short-sighted or blind (slepoi). lEnglish spelling variants include: Slepnikoff.  [Soundex Code S415]

Slivkov
nicknameСливков. This surname originates from the term slivki, meaning “cream”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term slivka, meaning “plum”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Slivkoff, Slevcove, Slevkoff, Slevkov, Slivkow, Slifkoff.  [Soundex Code S412]

Smirnov
nicknameСмирнов. Smirnov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the term smirnyi, meaning “timid”, “quiet” or “peaceful”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S565]

Smolin
nicknameСмолин. This surname derives from the term smola, meaning “tar”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with black hair, or perhaps an annoying, constant person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S545]

Sobolev
nicknameСоболев. This surname originates from the term sobol’  meaning “sable”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who kept sables, a sable-skin dealer, or someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sable. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soboloff, Soboleff, Sobolew.  [Soundex Code S141]

Soborov
nicknameСоборов. This surname originates from the term sobor, meaning “cathedral”, “council”, “assembly” or “synod”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S161]

Sofonov
firstnameСофонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sofon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S151]

Sofronov
firstnameСофронов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Sofron. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S165]

Sokhryakov
nicknameСохряков. This surname is derived from the verb sokhranyat’ meaning “to conserve”, “to maintain”, “to keep” or “to observe”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sakrekoff, Sakrekov, Sohriakoff, Sohrakoff, Soriakoff, Sochrekow.  [Soundex Code S262]

Sokolov
nicknameСоколов. This surname originates from the term sokol, meaning “falcon”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a falcon, perhaps a fierce, swift or keen-sighted individual. Note that this surname was borne by Lukian Sokolov, co-founder of the Pryguny branch of Molokans in Tambov province, Russia in the mid 19th century. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sokoloff.  [Soundex Code S241]

Solomakhin
nicknameСоломахин. This surname originates from the term solomakha, a type of porridge or gruel popular in Old Russia. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S452]

Solomentsev
locationalСоломенцев. This surname originates from the dialect term solomenets, meaning a “hay shed” and may refer to someone who lived at such a place. It may also refer to an inhabitant of any one of several places named Solomenny, Solomennoye or Solomino in Old Russia. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S455]

Solonitsyn
nicknameСолоницын. This surname originates from the dialect term solonitsa, meaning “saltcellar”. It is also suggested that the name indicates a family that originated from the region of the Solonitsa River in the Kostroma or Novogorod areas. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S453]

Solopov
nicknameСолопов. This surname originates from the dialect term solopyi, meaning “gaper” or “starer”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect verb solopit’ meaning “to look stupid”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S411]

Solov’ev
nicknameСоловьев. This surname originates from the term solovei, meaning “nightingale”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose singing voice was beautiful like that of a nightingale. lEnglish spelling variants include: Soloveoff, Soloveow, Soloveyov, Solovov, Solovioff, Solovieff, Solovev, Soloviov, Solovyov, Solovyev.  [Soundex Code S411]

Sopin
nicknameСопин. This surname originates from the verb sopiit’ meaning to “snore”, “snort” or “wheeze”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who breathed violently and noisily while awake or asleep. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code S110]

Sopuntsov
nicknameСопунцов. This surname is derived from the verb sopiit’ meaning to “snuffle”. Sopunets was the nickname given to a sniffler, someone who breathed noisily due to a cold or congestion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S153]

Sorokin
nicknameСорокин. This surname originates from the term soroka, meaning “magpie”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a magpie, perhaps a cunning, noisy or pilfering individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarokin.  [Soundex Code S625]

Sosin
firstnameСосин. This patronymic surname is derived from Sosa, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sosipatr. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term sosya, meaning a “thumb-sucking child”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S250]

Spiridonov
firstnameСпиридонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Spiridon. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S163]

Starostin
occupationalСтаростин. This surname originates from the term starosta, meaning “village elder”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Stepanov
firstnameСтепанов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Stepan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stepanoff.  [Soundex Code S315]

Stoyalov
nicknameСтоялов. This surname originates from the verb stoyat’, meaning “to stay”, “to lodge” or “to stand”. Stoyalets was the term given to a tenant or lodger. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S341]

Strakhov
nicknameСтрахов. This surname originates from the term strakh, meaning “fear”, “dread” or “terror”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a frightful or timid individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strekalov
nicknameСтрекалов. This surname originates from strekalo, the dialect term used to describe a person who “rustles”, “cracks”, “skips” or who is “prompt to jump” or “prompt to run”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S362]

Strel’nikov
occupationalСтрельников. This surname originates from the term strelnik, meaning “archer”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S364]

Stupenkin
nicknameСтупенкин. This surname originates from the dialect term stupen’ meaning “step”. Stupenka was the term for a “ladder”, “porch”, “cross-beam” or “board” onto which one steps. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S315]

Stupin
nicknameСтупин. This surname originates from the dialect term stupa, meaning “fat” or “slow”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Stoopin.  [Soundex Code S315]

Suchkin
nicknameСучкин. This surname originates from the term suchok, meaning a small “branch”, “twig”, “bough” or “knot”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S221]

Suchkov
nicknameСучков. This surname originates from the term suchok, meaning a small “branch”, “twig”, “bough” or “knot”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Suchkoff, Soochkoff.  [Soundex Code S221]

Sudakov
nicknameСудаков. This surname is derived from the term sudak, meaning “zander” fish. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S321]

Sukhov
nicknameСухов. This surname originates from the term sukhoi, meaning “dry”, “thin”, “spare” or “lean”.  This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was cold or unfriendly, or perhaps a thin or sickly individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sukhoff, Suhoff, Suhow, Suhovy.  [Soundex Code S210]

Sukovitsin
nicknameСуковицин. This surname originates from the dialect term sukovitsa, meaning “birch sap”. Birch sap was used as a medicine and tonic in Old Russia. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sukovitzen.  [Soundex Code S213]

Sulimov
firstnameСулимов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Turkic men’s name Sulim. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sulimoff.  [Soundex Code S451]

Sundukov
nicknameСундуков. This surname originates from the term sunduk, meaning “chest”, “box” or “trunk”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S532]

Suprunuk
firstnameСупрунук. This Ukrainian surname is derived from Suprun, a diminutive form of the men’s name Sofron.  [Soundex Code S165]

Surkov
nicknameСурков. This surname derives from the term surok, meaning “marmot” or “woodchuck”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a marmot, perhaps a sleepy, dense, solitary, small, clumsy or idle individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Sushilin
nicknameСушилин. This surname originates from the dialect term sushilo, meaning “hard” or “dry”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S245]

Susoev
firstnameСусоев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Susoi. lEnglish spelling variants include: Susoyeff, Sisoev, Sissoev, Sissov, Sissoyev, Susew, Susoff, Suesov, Suesoff, Susoev, Susov, Sussoev, Susoeff, Sosoyoff, Sysoyev, Sessoyeff, Sysoev.  [Soundex Code S210]

Suvorov
nicknameСуворов. This surname originates from the term suvora, meaning “grim”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was grim, harsh or stern. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S161]

Suzdal’tsev
locationalСуздальцев. This surname is derived from Suzdalets, the term for an inhabitant of the town of Suzdal, north-east of Moscow. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S234]

Svikhnushin
nicknameСвихнушин. This surname originates from the dialect verb svikhnut’ meaning “to shift”, “to break” or to “dislocate”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone with a dislocated joint or to someone dislocated in the broader physical, cultural, spiritual or emotional sense. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S125]

Sychov
nicknameСычов. This surname originates from the term sych, meaning “horned owl”. Note that this term also referred to a gloomy or unsociable person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S210]

Syrkov
nicknameСырков. This surname originates from the term syrka, meaning “grape vinegar”. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code S621]

Syrovatkin
nicknameСыроваткин. This surname originates from the term syrovatka, meaning “whey”, the watery part of milk that is separated from the curd in making cheese. Nicknames derived from foodstuffs were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code S613]

– T –

Talanov
nicknameТаланов. This surname originates from the dialect term talana, meaning “success” or “luck”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child, by superstitious parents, as a sign of good luck. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T451]

Talochkin
firstnameТалочкин. This surname is derived from Talochka, a diminutive form of the men’s names Vitalii, Vitalik and Natalii and the women’s names Vitalika, Vitalina, Vitaliya, Nataliha and Taisiya. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T422]

Tananaev
firstnameТананаев. This patronymic surname is derived from Tananai, a diminutive form of the men’s names Atanas or Afanasy. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T 551]

Taranov
firstnameТаранов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Taran. lEnglish spelling variants include: Taranoff, Terinoff, Taranow, Tarnoff. [Soundex Code T651]

Tarusov
locationalТарусов. This surname indicates a family that originated from the Old Russian town of Tarus. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T 621]

Telegin
nicknameТелегин. This surname originates from the term telega, meaning “cart”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who drove or manufactured carts. lEnglish spelling variants include: Telegen, Tellegen, Tellegin, Telegan, Telligin.  [Soundex Code T425]

Tepikin
nicknameТепикин. This surname may originate from the Turkic term tepik, meaning “ball”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from a corruption of the term tupik, meaning “blockhead” or “dolt”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T125]

Terekhov
firstnameТерехов. This patronymic surname is derived from Terekh, a diminutive form of the men’s name Terentii. lEnglish spelling variants include: Terekoff, Terehoff, Terichow, Terrichoff, Terikow, Terikhoff, Terikoff.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tershukov
firstnameТершуков. This patronymic surname is derived from Tereshuk, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Terentii, Tertii, Nester  and Proterii. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T622]

Tikhonov
firstnameТихонов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Tikhon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Teckenoff, Tickenoff, Tikonoff, Tikunoff, Tikunov, Tehanoff, Tekanoff, Tekunoff, Tickunoff, Tikhonoff, Tekanow, Tickonoff, Tehanow, Tigunoff, Tihanoff. [Soundex Code T251]

Tikunov
nicknameТикунов. This surname originates from the Hebrew term tikun, a book used by Jews to prepare for reading or writing a Torah scroll. The term may have been given as a nickname to a Russian Jew who used such a book. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T251]

Timofeev
firstnameТимофеев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Timofei. lEnglish spelling variants include: Timofeeff. [Soundex Code T511]

Titkov
firstnameТитков. This patronymic surname is derived from Titko, a diminutive form of the Old Russian men’s name Tit. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T321]

Titov
firstnameТитов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Tit. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T310]

Tobakarev
occupationalТабакарев. This surname originates from the dialect term tabakar, meaning “tobacconist” or “tobacco-seller”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code T126]

Tolmachev
occupationalТолмачев. This surname originates from the term tolmach, meaning “interpreter”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolmachoff, Tolmacheff, Talmachoff. [Soundex Code T452]

Tolmasov
firstnameТолмасов. This surname originates from the Tatar men’s name Tolmas. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolmasoff, Tolmosoff, Tolmsoff, Tolmas, Tholmasoff, Thomas.  [Soundex Code T452]

Tolopeev
nicknameТолопеев. This surname originates from the term tulup, meaning “sheepskin coat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who made or perhaps wore this peasant garment. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code T411]

Tolstoy
nicknameТолстой. This surname originates from the term tolstoi, meaning “fat”. This term was given as a nickname to a someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tolstoi, Tolstoj.  [Soundex Code T423] 

Tomilin
firstnameТомилин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Tomila. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tamelin, Tomlin, Tamalin, Tomelin.  [Soundex Code T545]

Treglazov
nicknameТреглазов. This surname originates from the term tre (“three”) + glaz (“eye”), meaning “three-eyed”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a foresighted or keen-sighted individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Treglazoff, Treglasoff, Triglass.  [Soundex Code T624]

Tregubov
nicknameТрегубов. This surname originates from the term tre (“three”) + gub (“lip”), meaning “three-lipped”. This term was given as a nickname to a someone with a cleft, deformed or hair lip. lEnglish spelling variants include: Treguboff.  [Soundex Code T621]

Tretyakov
nicknameТретяков. This surname originates from the term tretyak, meaning “third”. This term may have been given as a nickname to the third child in a family. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T632]

Trunilin
nicknameТрунилин. This surname originates from the verb trunit’, meaning “to mock” or “to ridicule”. Trunila was the term given to a “mocker” or “scoffer”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T654]

Trushchalev
nicknameТрущалев. This surname originates from the verb treshchat’, meaning “to crack”, “to crackle” or “to rattle”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T622]

Tsaplev
nicknameЦаплев. This surname originates from the dialect term tsaplya, meaning “seagull” or “heron”. Note that this term also referred to a “captious” or “petty” person. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T214]

Tsirkin
nicknameЦиркин. This surname is derived from the dialect verb tsirkat’ meaning “to chirp”.  In Russia, birds and insects make a sound perceived as tsirk-tsirk.  This term may have been given as a nickname to a noisy or whining child.  Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T262]

Tulupov
nicknameТулупов. This surname originates from the term tulup, meaning “sheepskin coat”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who wore a tulup, or perhaps a maker of such garments. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T411]

Tumanov
nicknameТуманов. This surname originates from the term tuman, meaning “fog”, “mist” or “haze”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone whose demeanor was gloomy or melancholy, or perhaps to a child whose birth was marked by such natural phenomenon. lEnglish spelling variants include: Tumanoff. [Soundex Code T551]

Tyrnov
nicknameТырнов. This surname originates from the dialect term tyrn, meaning “sloe”, the berry fruit of the blackthorn. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code T651] 

– 

– U –

Udaltsev
nicknameУдалцев. This surname originates from the term udalets, meaning a “bold” or “daring” man. This term may have been given as a nickname to a rash or venturesome individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U343]

Uklein
nicknameУклеин. This surname is derived from the term ukleya, meaning “bleak” fish. Note that this surname was borne by Semeon Uklein, co-founder of the Molokan movement in Tambov province, Russia in the late 18th century. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U245]

Uryupin
nicknameУрюпин. This surname originates from the dialect term uryupa, meaning “the nurse”, “the crybaby” or “sloven”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U615]

Usachev
nicknameУсачев. This surname originates from the term usach, meaning “bushy moustache”. This term would have been given as a nickname to a man with a broad, bushy moustache. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U221]

Ushakov
nicknameУшаков. This surname originates from the Turkic term ushak, meaning “undersized”, “petty mind” or “slanderer”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U221] 

Ustrashkin
nicknameУстрашкин. This surname originates from the verb ustrashat’ meaning “to intimidate”, “to daunt” or “to frighten”. The term ustrashka may have ben given as a nickname to an intimidating, frightening individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U236]

Uvarov
firstnameУваров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Uvar. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code U161]

V –

Vakulin
firstnameВакулин. This patronymic surname originates from the men’s name Vakul. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V245]

Valov
firstnameВалов. This surname originates from Valya, a diminutive form of several men’s names including Valent, Valerian and Valerii. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term val, meaning “shaft” or “roller”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Valoff, Voloff, Veloff.  [Soundex Code V410]

Varkov
nicknameВарков. This surname originates from the term varka, meaning “boiling”, “cooking” or “brewing”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Varkoff, Warkoff, Warcoff.  [Soundex Code V621]

Vashnikov
firstnameВашников. This patronymic surname is derived from Vashnik, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vasily. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vashnikoff.  [Soundex Code V 252]

Vasil’ev
firstnameВасильев. Vasil’ev is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It originates from the men’s name Vasily. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V241]

Vas’kov
firstnameВаськов. This patronymic surname is derived from Vas’ka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vasily. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V210] 

Vavilov
firstnameВавилов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Old Russian men’s name Vavilo. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V141]

Vechkanov
firstnameВечканов. This patronymic surname is derived from the Mordvinian men’s name Vechkan. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vechkanoff, Vechkonoff, Vichkanoff, Vichkonoff, Vickonoff.  [Soundex Code V225]

Vedenov
firstnameВеденов. This patronymic surname is derived from Vedenya, a diminutive form of the men’s name Venedikt. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vedenoff, Vedeniev, Vidinoff, Videnoff, Vidanov.  [Soundex Code V351]

Velikanov
nicknameВеликанов. This surname originates from the term velikan, meaning “giant”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a large, awkward or hulking individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V425]

Venediktov
firstnameВенедиктов. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Venedikt. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V532]

Vetrov
nicknameВетров. This surname is derived from the term veter, meaning “windy”.  Note that this term also referred to a “moody” personality. The term may have been given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia. [Soundex Code V361]

Vinogradov
nicknameВиноградов. This surname is derived from the term vinograd, meaning (grape) “vine”. Botanical nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vinogradoff.  [Soundex Code V526]

Vitsin
nicknameВицин. This surname is derived from the term vitsa, meaning “rod” or “switch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a tall, thin individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vitzin, Vitzen.  [Soundex Code V325]

Voblikov
nicknameВобликов. This surname originates from the Old Russian term vobly, meaning “round” or “fat”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vobla, meaning “sea roach”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V142] 

Volkov
nicknameВолков. This surname originates from the term volk, meaning “wolf”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a wolf, perhaps a lone, solitary individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Volkoff, Valkoff, Valkov, Wolkoff, Walkoff.  [Soundex Code V421]

Vologin
locationalВологин. This surname indicates a family that originated from the town of Vologa in North Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the dialect term vologa, meaning a cream-based “broth” or “sauce”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V425]

Voloshin
firstnameВолошин. This patronymic surname is derived from Volosha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Vladimir. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the Old Russian term volosh, meaning “Romanian” or “Walachian”.   [Soundex Code V425]

Vorob’ev
nicknameВоробьев. This surname originates from the term vorob, meaning “sparrow”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a sparrow, perhaps a swift, cheerful or singing individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Vorobieff, Varabioff, Worobioff, Varabieff, Verabioff, Vorobow, Vorobeyov, Vorobiov, Vorobyev, Vorobiev.  [Soundex Code V611]

Voronin
nicknameВоронин. This surname originates from the term voron (“raven”) or vorona (“crow”). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. lEnglish spelling variants include: Voronen, Varonan, Varonin, Veronin, Woronin, Johnson.  [Soundex Code V655]

Voronkov
nicknameВоронков. This surname originates from voronok, a diminutive form of the term voron (“raven”) or vorona (“crow”). This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a raven or crow, perhaps a harsh-voiced or black-haired individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V652]

Vyatkin
locationalВяткин. This surname indicates an ancestor who originated from Vyatka province, east of Moscow. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term vyatka, meaning “band” or “crowd” or “wedge”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V325]

– Y –

Yablokov
nicknameЯблоков. This surname originates from the term yabloko, meaning “apple”. Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry and may refer to someone who grew, sold or perhaps ate apples.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Yablokoff.  [Soundex Code Y142]

Yakovenko
firstnameЯковенко. This Ukrainian surname is derived from the men’s name Yakov.  [Soundex Code Y215]

Yakovlev
firstnameЯковлев. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yakov.  lEnglish spelling variants include: Yakovleff. [Soundex Code Y214]

Yakushev
firstnameЯкушев. This patronymic surname is derived from Yakusha, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yakov. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y221]

Yudin
firstnameЮдин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yuda. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Y350]

Yunkin
firstnameЮнкин. This matronymic surname is derived from Yunka, a diminutive form of the women’s names Yunia and Yunona. lEnglish spelling variants include: Unkin, Unken.  [Soundex Code Y525] 

Yurin
firstnameЮрин. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yuri. lEnglish spelling variants include: Urin, Uraine, Urain, Urenn, Urane, Uren, Wren, D’Uraine.  [Soundex Code Y650]

Yurkov
firstnameЮрков. This patronymic surname is derived from Yurka, a diminutive form of the men’s name Yuri. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term yurkii, meaning “quick”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Urkoff, Urkov.  [Soundex Code Y621]

Yurov
firstnameЮров. This patronymic surname is derived from the men’s name Yuri. lEnglish spelling variants include: Uroff.  [Soundex Code Y610]

Yurtaev
nicknameЮртаев. This surname originates from the Tatar term yurta, meaning a “tent” or “hut” used by Tatar and Mongol nomads in Old Russia. Note that this term also referred to a Cossack village. It is also suggested that the name can derive from Yurtava, the Mordvin name of the fairytale spirit said to inhabit the hearth. lEnglish spelling variants include: Yourtaev, Yurtaeff, Urtaeff, Yurtioff, Urtioff.  [Soundex Code Y631]

– Z –

Zabroskov
locationalЗабросков. This name is properly Zabrosky. The -ov suffix ending was added subsequent to its formation. This surname originates from the term za (“beyond”) + bros (“to shed” or “to dispose of”) and refers to someone who lived “beyond the garbage site”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z162]

Zadachin
nicknameЗадачин. This surname originates from the Old Russian term zadacha, meaning “good luck”. Note that this term also referred to a conceited person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zadachen.  [Soundex Code Z325]

Zadorkin
nicknameЗадоркин. This surname originates from the dialect term zaderikha, meaning “querrelsome”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z362]

Zaitsev
nicknameЗайцев. This surname originates from the term zaits, meaning “hare”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who resembled a hare in some respect, perhaps a swift, agile or timid individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zakharov
firstnameЗахаров. Zakharov is a very common and widely distributed surname in Russia. It is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Zakhar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zaharoff. [Soundex Code Z261]

Zakurdaev
nicknameЗакурдаев. This surname originates from the dialect term zakurdai, meaning “dandy” or “fop”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z263]

Zaradonkin
locationalЗарадонкин. This surname originates from the term za (“beyond”) + Radonka (a river in South Russia) and refers to someone who lived across the River Radonka. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zarodonkin.  [Soundex Code Z635]

Zarubin
nicknameЗарубин. This surname originates from the term zaruba, meaning “mark”, “scar” or “notch”. This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual with some distinguishing mark or scar. lEnglish spelling variants include: Sarubin, Zaroobin.  [Soundex Code Z615]

Zavarikhin
nicknameЗаварихин. This surname originates from the dialect term zavarikha, meaning “gruel” or “porridge”. Note that this term also referred to a  “gossip”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.   [Soundex Code Z162]

Zhabin
nicknameЖабин. This surname originates from the term zhaba, meaning “toad”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Jabin.  [Soundex Code Z150]

Zharkikh
nicknameЖарких. This surname originates from the term zharkii, meaning “hot”, “burning” or “violent”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zharkih, Jarkeh, Jarkeih.  [Soundex Code Z620]

Zhdanov
nicknameЖданов. This surname is derived from the term zhdanii, meaning “long awaited”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a long awaited child. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z351]

Zheltkov
nicknameЖелтков. This surname is derived from the term zheltok, meaning “the yolk” (of an egg). Food nicknames such as this were popular among the agrarian Russian peasantry. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z432] 

Zheltov
nicknameЖелтов. This surname is derived from the term zhelto, meaning “yellow” or “yellowish”. Note that this surname was borne by Molokan writer and martyr Feodor Zheltov (1861-1938). Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z431] 

Zherebtsov
nicknameЖеребцов. This surname originates from the term zherebets, meaning “stallion” or “wren”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of an stallion. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z613] 

Zhidkov
nicknameЖидков. This surname originates from the term zhidkii, meaning “watery”, “liquid or “fluid”. Note that this term also meant “thin” or “sparse”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zhmaev
nicknameЖмаев. This surname is derived from the Old Russian verb zhimat’ meaning “to press”, “to squeeze” or “to pinch”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zmei, meaning “snake”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Jmaev.  [Soundex Code Z510]

Zholnin
nicknameЖолнин. This surname originates from the term zhelna, meaning “woodpecker”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a woodpecker, perhaps a persistent or tiresome individual. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z455]

Zhukov
nicknameЖуков. This surname originates from the term zhuk, meaning “beetle”. Note that this term also referred to a dark-haired person. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zukoff.  [Soundex Code Z210]

Zhulin
nicknameЖулин. This surname is derived from the verb zhulit‘ meaning “to swindle” or “to cheat”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the verb zhulit’sya, meaning “to press close”, “to shiver” or “to screw up the face”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zhoolin, Joolin, Julin, Gulin, Goolin. [Soundex Code Z450]

Zhuravlev
nicknameЖуравлев. This surname originates from the term zhuravl’ meaning “crane”. This term may have been given as a nickname to someone who possessed some quality characteristic of a crane, perhaps a tall, thin man with long, spindly legs. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z614; J641]

Zhuravtsev
locationalЖуравцев. This surname originates from Zhuravets, the name given to an inhabitant of any one of several settlements named Zhuravo, Zhuravka or Zhuravin in Old Russia. It is also suggested that the name can derive from the term zhuravets, meaning “lever”. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z613]

Zolnikov
occupationalЗолников. This surname originates from the term zolnik, meaning “ashman”, someone who collected and sold ashes (zola). Note that this term also referred to the part of a Russian oven where ashes accumulated. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zolnikoff, Zolnekoff.  [Soundex Code Z452]

Zolotov
nicknameЗолотов. This surname originates from the term zoloto, meaning “gold”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a wealthy individual, or perhaps someone with golden hair color. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zolotoff.  [Soundex Code Z431]

Zor’kin
nicknameЗорькин. This surname originates from the term zorkii, meaning “sharp-sighted” or “keen of sight”. It is also suggested that the name can derive from zor’ka, a diminutive form of the term zarya, meaning “dawn”.  [Soundex Code Z625]

Zotikov
firstnameЗотиков. This surname is patronymic in origin and is derived from the men’s name Zotik. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z321]

Zotov
firstnameЗотов. This patronymic surname originates from the men’s name Zot. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code V310]

Zubachev
nicknameЗубачев. This surname originates from zubach, the term for someone with big teeth (zubyi). This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zubachoff.  [Soundex Code Z121]

Zubarov
nicknameЗубаров. This surname originates from the dialect term zubar’, meaning “big teeth” (zubyi). This term may have been given as a nickname to an individual who matched this description. [Soundex Code Z161]

Zyuzin
nicknameЗюзин. This surname is derived from the term zyuza meaning “crybaby”, “slovenly” or “drunkard”. This term was given as a nickname to someone who matched this description. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z250]

Zvansky
locationalЗванский. This surname indicates a family that originated from a village named ZvanaZvanka or Zvanets, so called from the term zvanie, meaning “calling” or “summons”. lEnglish spelling variants include: Zvanski, Zvanskiy, Zvanskii, Zvanskij.  [Soundex Code Z152]

Zvyagin
nicknameЗвягин. This surname derives from the term zvyaga, meaning “shouter”, “whiner” or “grumbler”. This term may have been given as a nickname to a child who matched this discription. Among the Molokans, this surname occurred only in Russia.  [Soundex Code Z125]

Notes

From 1904 to 1912, over 3,500 Molokans emigrated from the Caucasus region of Russia to America, settling in California, Oregon, Arizona and Mexico. At the time there were an estimated 1,200,000 Molokans in Russia. Less than 3% of all Molokans joined the migration. (For more demographics, see Molokane.org.) Therefor, as the primary focus of this glossary is Molokan surnames in America, it comprises only a fraction of all historical Molokan surnames. 

Note that approximately two hundred Molokan immigrants – over five per-cent of all Molokans who joined the migration – arrived through Canadian ports between 1904 and 1907 en route to the United States. For an index of known Canadian ship passenger records and border crossing records containing Molokan immigrants see Molokan Immigration Via Canada.

When the Molokans arrived in America, there was no standard system for transliterating Russian (Cyrillic) spellings into the English (Latin) alphabet. Furthermore, many Molokan immigrants were illiterate and had no notion that any one spelling of their surname was more correct than another. As a consequence, the English spelling of Molokan surnames became largely a matter of choice, and many spelling variants arose for each name. For example, the original Russian Bobyshev became Bobishoff, Babashoff, Babeshoff, Babishoff, Babshaw, Babshoff and Babshow in America. With this in mind, I have used the standard Russian spelling of each surname, based on the U.S. Library of Congress System, followed by English spelling variants. 

As part of the assimilation process, some Molokans deliberately changed their Russian surnames to English-sounding ones. Often the old surname was not entirely abandoned, but was reduced to one or two syllables: Bolder (Boldyrev), Cherney (Chernikov), Fettis (Fetisov), Hall (Golovachev), Kalp (Kolpakov), Kissel (Kiselev), Klubnik (Klubnikin), Matchn (Mechnev), Novak (Novikov), Ruddy (Rudometkin), Sherr (Shcherbakov), Suhovy (Sukhov), Tolmas (Tolmasov). Sometimes a genuine English surname was adopted which began with the same syllable or sounds as the old surname: D’Uraine (Yurin), Ghosoph (Gusev), Liege (Ledyaev), Preston (Prokhorov), Proffitt (Prokhorov), Seaking (Sayapin), Thomas (Tolmasov). Occasionally the new surname was based on the English language equivalent of the old surname: Andrews (Andreev), Eagles (Orlov). Often the new surname had nothing to do with the old surname: Emerald (Karyakin), Johnson (Voronin), Nichols (Stupin), Riley (Golitsin), Saber (Tikhonov). Finally, entirely new surnames were added through intermarraige: Goudy, Janke.

The Soundex is a coded last name (surname) index based on the way a name sounds rather than the way it is spelled. Surnames that sound the same, but are spelled differently, like Konovalov, Konovaloff and Conovaloff, have the same code and are filed together. The Soundex coding system was developed so that you can find a surname even though it may have been recorded under various spellings. Knowing a surname’s Soundex code is useful and important, since many public archives, libraries and other institutions use Soundex-based finding aids and research tools.

Bibliography

  • Benson, M., Dictionary of Russian Personal Names (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1964).
  • Dal, V.I., Tolkovyi Slovar Zhivogo Velikorusskago Iazyka (Moscow, 1999).
  • Fedosiuk, Y.A., Russkie Familii: Populiarnii Etomologicheskii Slovar (Moscow, 1996).
  • Khalikov, A. Kh., 500 Ruski Familii c Bulgaro-Tatarski Prouzkhog (Sofia, 1993).
  • Nikonov, V.A., Slovar Russkikh Familii (Moscow: 1993).
  • Petrovskii, N.A., Slovar Russkikh Lichnikh Imen (Moscow, 1968).
  • Unbegaun, B.O., Russian Surnames (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972).

This is a work-in-progress. If you are aware of other Molokan surnames or surname spellings in America, please contact the author Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

Russian Male Names Among the Doukhobors

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

The following encyclopedic glossary contains 292 Russian male names historically used by Doukhobor men in 19th century Russia and 20th century Canada. Each entry includes the transliterated English spelling, original Cyrillic spelling, pronunciation, name meaning and history, male and female patronymic form, along with many common diminutive forms of each name. Use this glossary to learn about all aspects of the personal names of your Russian male ancestors.  Note: to search for a particular name, use the alphabetical index below or else use your browser’s <find> function by pressing <Control F> and typing in the name. Search for Russian female names among the Doukhobors.

Index – DEFGIKLMNOPSTUVYZ

 

– A –

Abakum
Cyrillic: Абакум. Pronunciation: ah-bah-KOOM. Etymology: Popular form of Avvakum.

Abram
Cyrillic: Абрам. Pronunciation: ah-BRAHM. Etymology: Popular form of Avraam.

Abrosim
Cyrillic: Абросим. Pronunciation: ah-BROH-seem. Etymology: Popular form of Amvrosii.

Adam
Cyrillic: Адам. Pronunciation: ah-DAHM. Etymology: Hebrew name meaning “man”. Patronymics: Adamovich; Adamovna. Diminutives: Adamushka, Adasha, Ada, Adya, Adamik, Adashenka, Adashechka, Adashka, Adik, Adka.

Adrian
Cyrillic: Адриан. Pronunciation: ah-dree-AHN. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Hadrianus, meaning “from Hadria”, an ancient Roman city. Patronymics: Adrianovich; Adrianovna. Diminutives: Adrianka, Adriakha, Adriasha, Adrya, Adya, Ad’ka, Adrianushka, Adriansha, Adriashen’ka, Adriashechka, Adriashka, Adrik, Andriyanka, Andriakha, Andriyakha, Adriyanushka, Adriyakha, Adriyasha, Adriyashen’ka, Adriyashka, Andriasha, Andriyasha, Andrya, Andryusha, Andriyanka, Andriyanushka, Andriyakha, Andriyasha, Andriyashen’ka, Andriyashka, Andryusha, Andryushen’ka, Andryushechka, Andryushka, Andra, Yanka, Yanushka, Yasha, Adenk’ka, Adechka, Adik.

Afanasii
Cyrillic: Афанасий. Pronunciation: ah-fa-NAH-see. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Athanasia, meaning “immortal”. Patronymics: Afanasievich; Afanasievna. Diminutives: Afonya, Afanushka, Afanasya, Afanyushka, Afanasa, Fanya, Nasya, Fonya, Afosya, Fosya, Fosha, Apanaska, Panasa, Afanas, Afanasechka, Afanaska, Afanasochka, Afanasushka, Fosya, Fasya, Afanasyushka, Afonsha, Afonyushka, Afocenka, Afosechka, Afoska, Fana, Fanechka, Fanik, Afanik, Afanka, Fanka, Fanasochka, Fanushka, Fanka, Fanyushka, Fonechka, Fonik, Fonka, Fona, Fonya, Fonyushka, Fonyak, Fosenka, Fosechka, Foska, Faska.

Afinogen
Cyrillic: Афиноген. Pronunciation: ah-fee-nah-GEHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Athenogenes, meaning “descendant of Athena”. Patronymics: Afinogenovich; Afinogenovna. Diminutives: Finasha, Finogei, Anfinogen, Afinogenka, Finogenka, Finogena, Gena, Fina, Finakha, Finokha, Finosha, Finashenka, Finashka, Finka, Finokha, Finogenochka, Finogenushka, Finochka, Finoshenka, Finoshechka, Finoshka, Finushka.

Agafon
Cyrillic: Агафон. Pronunciation: ah-gah-FOHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Agathon, meaning “good” or “well”. Patronymics: Agafonovich; Agafonovna. Diminutives: Agafonushka, Aganya, Agafonka, Agafonya, Afonya, Fonya, Agafosha, Fosha, Agasha, Agaposha, Gaposha, Gapa, Aganya, Agaposha, Agaposhenka, Agaposhka, Agafonechka, Agafonka, Agafosha, Agafoshenka, Agafoshechka, Agafoshka, Agashka, Agashenka, Agashechka, Agashka, Gaposhenka, Gaposhka, Gapochka, Agap.

Agap
Cyrillic: Агап. PronunciationEtymology: ah-GAHP. Russian form of Greek Agapao, meaning “to love”. Patronymics: Agapovich; Agapovna. Diminutives: Aga, Agapka, Aganya, Aganechka, Agan’ka, Agapa, Agapochka, Agapushka, Agapchik, Agashen’ka, Agashechka, Agashka, Agasha, Gapa, Gan’ka, Ganyushka, Ganyusha, Gapka, Gaposha, Gaposhenka, Gaposhka, Ganya, Gasha, Gashen’ka, Gashechka, Gashka.

Agapon
Cyrillic: Агапон. Pronunciation: ah-gah-POHN. Etymology: Popular form of Agafon.

Aggei
Cyrillic: Аггей. Pronunciation: ah-GYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Haggai, meaning “festive”. Patronymics: Aggeevich; Aggeevna. Diminutives: Ageika, Ageyushka.

Akim
Cyrillic: Аким. Pronunciation: ah-KEEHM. Etymology: Popular form of Iakim.

Aldokim
Cyrillic: Алдоким. Pronunciation: ahl-dah-KEEHM. Etymology: Popular form of Evdokim.

Aleksandr
Cyrillic: Александр. Pronunciation: ah-lyek-SAHNDR. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Alexandros, meaning “defender of mankind”. Patronymics: Aleksandrovich; Aleksandrovna. Diminutives: Aleksandrushka, Lyoksya, Aleksanya, Sasha, Sanya, Sanyura, Sanyuta, Sanyukha, Sanyusha, Aleksakha, Aleksasha, Sashukha, Sashulya, Sashunya, Sashuta, Sashura, Shura, Shurunya, Aleksya, Aleksyukha, Aleksyusha, Alya, Asya, Leksa, Leoksa, Leksanya, Leksasha, Aleksandrinka, Aleksandrinushka, Alek, Aleksandrusha, Aleksanechka, Aleksanka, Aleksanochka, Aleksanushka, Aleksanka, Aleksanya, Aleksashenka, Aleksashka, Aleksenka, Aleksechka, Aleksyushenka, Aleksyushka, Alenka, Alechka, Alik, Alka, Alchik, Leksana, Leksanechka, Leksanka, Leksanok, Leksanchik, Leksanyusha, Leksya, Leoksha, Leksashenka, Leksashka, Sanok, Sanek, Sanechka, Sanuk, Sanochka, Sanko, Sanka, Sanik, , Sanchik, Sansha, Sanka, Sanyurka, Sanyuronka, Sanyurochka, Sanyurushka, Sanyutka, Sanyutochka, Sanyutushka, Sanyukha, Sanyushenka, Sanyushechka, Sanyushka, Sakha, Sakhei, Sakheika, Sakhon, Sakhun, Sashenka, Sashechka, Sashka, Sashko, Sashok, Sashochek, Sashuk, Sashulenka, Sashulechka, Sashulka, Sashunechka, Sashunchik, Sashunka, Sashurenka, Sashurka, Sashuronka, Sashurochka, Sashutka, Sashutochka, Sashukha, Shanik, Shanka, Shanya, Shasha, Shashko, Shashok, Shashura, Shulya, Shunya, Shuranya, Shurei, Shurena, Shurenka, Shurenok, Shurenochka, Shurenka, Shurets, Shurik, Shurka, Shurok, Shuronka, Shurochka, Shurunok, shurunchik, Shurunka, Shurusha, Shurushka, Shurchik, Shuriga, Shusya, Shusha, Shuya, Shushka.

Aleksei
Cyrillic: Алексей. Pronunciation: ah-lyek-SYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Alexyos, meaning “helper” or “defender”. Patronymics: Alekseevich; Alekseevna. Diminutives: Alyosha, Alenka, Leksei, Alekseika, Alekha, Lekha, Alesha, Lyokha, Alyokha, Lesha, Lyosha, Alenya, Alyonya, Aleka, Alyoka, Leka, Lyoka, Lelya, Lyolya, Alya, Alyunya, Lyunya, Lekseika, Leksa, Leksya, Lyoksa, Alekochka, Alyokochka, Aleksa, Alyoksa, Alekseishche, Aleksyushka, Alenechka, Alyonechka, Alechka, Aleshai, Aleshenka, Alyoshenka, Aleshechka, Alyoshechka, Aleshik, Alyoshik, Alka, Alyunechka, Alyunka, Alyunya, Alya, Alyakha, Lekochka, Lyokochka, Leksyushkia, Leksya, Leleka, Lelyoka, Lelenka, Lyolenka, Lelechka, Lyolechka, Lelik, Lyolik, Lelka, Lyolka, Lenechka, Lyonechka, Lenik, Lyonik, Lenka, Lyonka, Lenok, Lenka, Lyonka, Lensha, Lyonsha, Lenyushka, Lyonyushka, Lenya, Lyonya, Lenyak, Lesya, Lekha, Lyokha, Lesha, Lyosha, Leshenka, Lyoshenka, Leshechka, Lyoshechka, Leshik, Lyoshik, Leshka, Lyoshka, Leshok, Leshonok

Alistrat
Cyrillic: Алистрат. Pronunciation: ahl-lee-STRAHT. Etymology: Popular form of Evstrat.

Ambrosii
Cyrillic: Амбросий. Pronunciation: ahm-BROH-see. Etymology: Popular form of Amvrosii.

Amel’yan
Cyrillic: Амельян. Pronunciation: ah-meel-YAHN. Etymology: Popular form of Emel’yan.

Amvrosii
Cyrillic: Амвросий. Pronunciation: ahm-VROH-see. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Ambrosyos, meaning “immortal”. Patronymics: Amvrosievich; Amvrosievna. Diminutives: Abrosya, Abrosimka, Rosya, Amvroska, Abrosenka, Abrosechka, Abroska, Abrosimushka.

Anan
Cyrillic: Анан. Pronunciation: ah-NAN. Etymology: Popular form of Ananii.

Ananii
Cyrillic: Ананий. Pronunciation: ah-NAN-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Nanan, meaning “charitable” or “merciful”. Patronymics: Ananievich; Ananievna. Diminutives: Ananya, Anakha, Anasha, Ananechka, Anan’ka, Anashen’ka, Anashka, Nanya, Nana, Nanechka, Nanka, Nanochka, Nanushka, Nan’ka.

Andrei
Cyrillic: Андрей. Pronunciation: ahn-DRYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Andreios, meaning “man”. Patronymics: Andreevich; Andreevna. Diminutives: Andrusha, Andreika, Andryukha, Andrya, Andryusha, Andryunya, Andreichik, Andreisha, Andryushka, Andreanka, Andreanushka, Andreansha, Andreakha, Andreasha, Andreashenka, Andreashka, Andrik, Andryushenka, Andryushechka, Andryunechka, Andryunka, Andrukh, Dryunya, Dyunka, Dyunya, Dyusha, Dyuka, Dusenka, Dusechka, Dusik, Duska, Dusya.

Andrian
Cyrillic: Андриан. Pronunciation: ahn-dree-AHN. Etymology: Popular form of Adrian.

Anikei
Cyrillic: Аникей. Pronunciation: ah-nee-KYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Anikii.

Anikii
Cyrillic: Аникий. Pronunciation: ah-NEE-kee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Nike, meaning “victory”. Patronymics: Anikievich; Anikievna. Diminutives: Anika, Anikeika, Nika, Nikakha, Nikasha, Nikanushka, Nikashenka, Nikashechka, Nikashka.

Anisim
Cyrillic: Анисим. Pronunciation: ah-NEE-seem. Etymology: Popular form of Onisim.

Antip
Cyrillic: Антип. Pronunciation: ahn-TEEP. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Anti, meaning “like” or “against” or possibly Antipatros, meaning “like the father”. Patronymics: Antipovich; Antipovna. Diminutives: Antipka, Antipon’ka, Antipochka, Antipushka, Tipa.

Anton
Cyrillic: Антон. Pronunciation: ahn-TOHN. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Antonius, possibly meaning “invaluable”. Patronymics: Antonovich; Antonovna. Diminutives: Antonya, Antonushka, Antonka, Tonya, Antokha, Antosha, Tosha, Antosya, Tosya, Antya, Antonechka, Antonik, Antoninka, Antoninochka, Antoninushka, Antonichek, Antosenka, Antosechka, Antosik, Antos, Antoska, Antosh, Antoshek, Antoshenka, Antoshechka, Antyukha, Tonechka, Tonik, Tonka, Tonsha, Tosenka, Tosechka, Tosik, Toska, Toshenka, Toshechka, Toshik, Toshka.

Antonii
Cyrillic: Антоний. Pronunciation: ahn-TOHN-ee. Etymology: Old Russian form of Anton.

Anufrii
Cyrillic: Ануфрий. Pronunciation: ah-NOO-free. Etymology: Popular form of Onufrii.

Apanas
Cyrillic: Апанас. Pronunciation: ah-pah-NAHS. Etymology: Popular form of Afanasii.

Arefii
Cyrillic: Арефий. Pronunciation: ah-RYEF-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Arabian Harata, meaning “to plough the land”. Patronymics: Arefievich; Arefievna. Diminutives: Aresha, Arefka, Arekha, Arefa, Aref, Arya, Arik, Arefochka, Arefushka, Arechka, Areshka, Areshenka, Areshechka, Aripka.

Arkadii
Cyrillic: Аркадий. Pronunciation: ahr-KAH-dee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Arkadios, meaning “of Arcadia”, a region in Greece. Patronymics: Arkadievich; Arkadievna. Diminutives: Arkasha, Arkadyushka, Arya, Kadya, Kanya, Kana, Adya, Arkadik, Arkan, Arkakha, Arkashenka, Arkashechka, Arkashka, Arechka, Arik, Arenka, Adka, Adik, Adenka, Adechka, Kadenka, Kadechka, Kadik, Kadko, Kadonka, Kadka, Kadyaika, Kanechka, Kanik, Kanka, Kanochka, Kanushka.

Arkhip
Cyrillic: Архип. Pronunciation: ahr-KHEEP. Etymology: Popular form of Arkhipp.

Arkhipp
Cyrillic: Архипп. Pronunciation: ahr-KHEEP. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Archippos, meaning “master of horses”. Patronymics: Arkhippovich; Arkhippovna. Diminutives: Arkhipka, Arya, Arkhipushka, Arka, Ar’ka.

Artemii
Cyrillic: Артемий. Pronunciation: ahr-TYEH-meey. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Artemisios, derived from the name of the Greek goddess ArtemisPatronymics: Artemievich; Artemievna. Diminutives: Artem’yushka, Arta, Artya, Artyunya, Tyunya, Artyukha, Artyusha, Tyusha, Artyoma, Artyomka, Artyomchik, Tema, Temka, Tyoma, Tyunechka, Tyunchik, Tyun’ka, Tyun’sha, Tyunya, Artyosha, Artemonka, Artemonushka, Artyomochka, Artyomushka, Artyomsha, Artechka, Artyoshenk’ka, Artyoshka, Artyunechka, Artyun’ka, Artyushechka, Artyushka, Artyushonok.

Artyom
Cyrillic: Артём. Pronunciation: ahr-TYOHM. Etymology: Popular form of Artemii.

Asei
Cyrillic: Асей. Pronunciation: ahs-SYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Evsevii.

Astafei
Cyrillic: Астафей. Pronunciation: ah-STAH-fee. Etymology: Popular form of Evstafii.

Avdei
Cyrillic: Авдей. Pronunciation: ahv-DYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Obadiah, meaning “servant of God”. Patronymics: Avdeevich; Avdeevna. Diminutives: Avdeika, Avdeichik, Avdechka, Avdeyushka, Avdiyushka, Avdochka, Avdya, Avda, Avdyukha, Avdyusha, Avdasha, Avdashenk’ka, Avdashechka, Avdashka, Avdyunya, Avdusya, Avdyusya, Avdusen’ka, Avdusechka, Avdus’ka, Avdyunechka, Avdyun’ka, Avdyun’ka, Avdyusen’ka, Avdyusechka, Avdyus’ka, Avdyushka, Avdyushen’ka, Avdyushechka, Avdyushka, Ad’ka, Aden’ka, Adechka, Adya.

Avdokim
Cyrillic: Авдоким. Pronunciation: ahv-dah-KEEHM. Etymology: Popular form of Evdokim.

Averkii
Cyrillic: Аверкий. Pronunciation: ah-VYER-kee. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Averto, meaning “to restore” or “to return”. Patronymics: Averkievich; Averkievna. Diminutives: Avera, Averechka, Averka, Averochka, Averushka, Aver’ka, Aver’yushka, Aver’yanka, Aver’yanushka, Averyushka, Averya, Aver’yaika, Vera, Verka, Verochka, Verushka, Yan, Yana, Yanka, Yanochka, Yanushka.

Aver’yan
Cyrillic: Аверьян. Pronunciation: ah-vyer-YAHN. Etymology: Popular form of Averkii.

Avraam
Cyrillic: Авраам. Pronunciation: ah-VRAHM. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Abraham, meaning “father of multitudes”. Patronymics: Avraamovich; Avraamovna. Diminutives: Abramya, Abramka, Abramushka, Avramka, Avraamka, Avrakha, Avraakha, Abrakha, Avrasha, Avraasha, Abrasha, Abramok, Avramok, Avraamochka, Avramochka, Abramochka, Avraamushka, Avramushka, Avraashenka, Avrashenka, Abrashenka, Avraashka, Avrashka, Abrashka, Avrashechka.

Avsei
Cyrillic: Авсей. Pronunciation: ahv-SYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Evsevii.

Avvakum
Cyrillic: Аввакум. Pronunciation: ah-vah-KOOM. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Habaqquq, meaning “to surround” or “to embrace”. Patronymics: Avvakumovich; Avvakumovna. Diminutives: Abasha, Abakumushka, Abakumka, Avvakumka, Avvakusha, Abakurka, Abashka, Avvakumushka, Avvakumchik, Avvakushenka, Avvakushechka.

– B –

Boris
Cyrillic: Борис. Pronunciation: bah-REES. Etymology: Although usually explained as a short form of Borislav, meaning “fame in battle”, it is most likely of Turkic origin, perhaps meaning “short” or “wolf”. Patronymics: Borisovich; Borisovna. Diminutives: Borya, Boriska, Borits, Boryulya, Borulya, Boryunya, Boryusya, Boryukha, Boryusha, Boryakha, Boryasha, Boba, Borenka, Borechka, Borika, Borina, Borisik, Boriska, Borisushka, Borisha, Borulechka, Borulka, Borusenka, Borusechka, Boruska, Borusya, Borcha, Borchuk, Borka, Boryuka, Boryunechka, Boryunchik, Boryunka, Boryushenka, Boryushka, Boryashenka, Boryshka, Busenka, Busechka, Buska, Busya.

– D –

Daniil
Cyrillic: Даниил. Pronunciation: dah-nee-EEL. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Daniel, meaning “God is my judge”. Patronymics: Daniilovich; Daniilovna. Diminutives: Danilushka, Danilka, Dansha, Danilo, Danisha, Danya, Dana, Nila, Danechka, Danilei, Danilok, Danilochka, Danilchuk, Danisha, Danishenka, Danishechka, Danishka, Danka, Danko, Danochka, Danusenka, Danusechka, Danuska, Danusya, Danyusha, Danyushka.

Danila
Cyrillic: Данила. Pronunciation: dahn-NEE-lah. Etymology: Popular form of Daniil.

Danilo
Cyrillic: Данило. Pronunciation: dahn-NEE-lah. Etymology: Old Russian form of Daniil.

David
Cyrillic: Давид. Pronunciation: dah-VEED. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Dauid, meaning “beloved”. Patronymics: Davidovich; Davidovna. Diminutives: Davidka, Davidok, Davidushka, Davka, Davochka, Dodya, Doden’ka, Dodechka, Dodik, Dava, Vidya, Videchka, Vidka, Vidochka, Vid’ka, Davydka, Davydok, Davydushka.

Dementii
Cyrillic: Дементий. Pronunciation: dye-MYEN-tee. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Domitius, meaning “tamed”. Patronymics: Dementievich; Dementievna. Diminutives: Dyoma, Dyomka, Dementyushka, Demenya, Demenechka, Dementechka, Dementyusha, Demenka, Dema, Demka, Demochka, Deomochka, Demushka, Dyomushka.

Dem’yan
Cyrillic: Демьян. Pronunciation: dyem-YAHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Damazo, meaning “to subdue” or “to subjegate”. Patronymics: Dementievich; Dementievna. Diminutives: Dyoma, Dyomka, Demyanka, Demyasha, Dema, Demka, Dyomushka, Demushka, Demyanka, Demyanochka, Demyanushka, Demyasha, Demyashenka, Demyashka.

Denis
Cyrillic: Денис. Pronunciation: dye-NEES. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Dionysios, derived from the Greek god DionysosPatronymics: Denisovich; Denisovna. Diminutives: Denya, Denisushka, Denyushka, Deniska, Dena, Denusya, Dusya, Desha, Deona, Denechka, Denisa, Denisok, Denisonka, Denisochka, Denka, Denochka, Denusenka, Denusechka, Denuska, Denushka, Deshenka, Deshka, Dusenka, Dusechka, Dusik, Duska.

Dmitrii
Cyrillic: Дмитрий. Pronunciation: d-MEET-ree. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Demetrios, derived from the Greek goddess DemeterPatronymics: Dmitrievich; Dmitrievna. Diminutives: Mitya, Dima, Mitrii, Mitrei, Dimakha, Dimasha, Dimukha, Dimusha, Dimulya, Dimusya, Mityulya, Mitulya, Mityunya, Mityukha, Mityusha, Mityakha, Mityasha, Mitrya, Mitra, Mitro, Mitrasha, Mitryukha, Mitryusha, Dmitrii, Dimashenka, Dimashka, Dimik, Dimka, Dimonka, Dimochka, Dimulenka, Dimulechka, Dimulka, Dimusenka, Dimusechka, Dimusik, Dimuska, Dimushenka, Dimushechka, Dimushka, Dimchik, Dimsha, Mita, Mitei, Mitek, Mityok, Miten, Mityon, Mitenka, Mitekha, Mityokha, Mitechka, Mitka, Mitonka, Mitochka, Mitrak, Mitrashka, Mitrashenka, Mitrashechka, Mitreika, Mitrechka, Mitryushka, Mitrik, Mitryai, Mitryak, Mitulik, Mitulka, Mitulya, Mitukh, Mitusha, Mitushka, Mitushok, Mitko, Mitsha, Mityuk, MItyulenka, Mityulechka, Mityulik, Mityulka, Mityunka, Mityunsha, Mityunya, Mitrukha, Mitrusha, Mitryusha, Mitryushenka, Mitryushechka, Mitrya, Mityukha, Mityusha, Mityushok, Mityaga, Mitiai, Mityaika, Mityaka, Mityanya, Mityakha, Mityasha, Mityashenka, Mityashechka, Mityashka, Mityayushka.

Dorofei
Cyrillic: Дорофей. Pronunciation: dah-rah-FYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Dorotheos, meaning “gift of God”. Patronymics: Dorofeevich; Dorofeevna. Diminutives: Dorechka, Dorofeyushka, Dorofeika, Dorokha, Dorosha, Doronya, Dora, Dorya, Dorenka, Doronka, Doronechka, Doronyushka, Dorochka, Doroshenka, Doroshechka, Dorushka, Dorka.

– E –

Efim
Cyrillic: Ефим. Pronunciation: yeh-FEEM. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Euphemos, meaning “well-spoken”. Patronymics: Efimovich; Efimovna. Diminutives: Efimka, Efimushka, Fima, Fimulya, Fisha, Efimok, Efimonka, Efimochka, Efimusha.

Efrem
Cyrillic: Ефрем. Pronunciation: yeh-FRYEM. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Efraim, meaning “fruitful”. Patronymics: Efremovich; Efremovna. Diminutives: Efremka, Efremushka, Rema, Efremochka.

Egor
Cyrillic: Егор. Pronunciation: YEH-gohr. Etymology: Popular form of Georgii.

Eleferii
Cyrillic: Елеферий. Pronunciation: yeh-lye-FEHR-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eleutheros, meaning “free”. Patronymics: Eleferievich; Eleferievna. Diminutives: Elefer’ka, Elefer’yushka, Eleferya, Elechka, Elerya, El’ka, Erya, Erechka, Er’ka, Eryuta, Elya, Lefera, Leferka, Leferochka, Leferushka, Ferya, Fera, Ferechka, Ferka, Ferochka, Ferushka, Fer’ka.

Elisei
Cyrillic: Елисей. Pronunciation: yeh-lee-SYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Elisha, meaning “my God is salvation”. Patronymics: Eliseevich; Eliseevna. Diminutives: Elya, Eliseika, Eliseyushka, Elesya, Elen’ka, Elesen’ka, Elesechka, Eleska, Eles’ka, Elechka, Lesya, Lesen’ka, Lesechka, Leska, Liseika, Liseyushka.

Elistrat
Cyrillic: Елистрат. Pronunciation: yeh-lee-STRAHT. Etymology: Popular form of Evstrat.

Elizar
Cyrillic: Елизар. Pronunciation: yeh-lee-ZAHR. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Elazar, meaning “my God has helped”. Patronymics: Elizarovich; Elizarovna. Diminutives: Elizarka, Elizarochka, Elizarushka, Lazya, Lazechka, Laz’ka, Lizara, Lizaryonok, Lizarka, Lizarochka, Lizarushka, Zara, ZaryaZaren’ka, Zarechka, Zarik, Zarka, Zaron’ka, Zarochka, Zarushka, Zar’ka, Zaryushka.

Emel’yan
Cyrillic: Емельян. Pronunciation: yeh-myel-YAHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Aimylios, meaning “flattering” or “adulatory”. Patronymics: Emel’yanovich; Emel’yanovna. Diminutives: Emelya, Melyosha, Emelianushka, Emelianka, Emeliasha, Melya, Melyokha, Melesha, Melekha, Emil, Emelenka, Emelechka, Emelka, Emelyusha, Emelianochka, Emeliashenka, Emeliashechka, Emeliashka, Emelyushka, Melenka, Melenya, Melechka, Melyoshenka, Meleshenka, Melyoshechka, Meleshechka, Meleshka, Melyoshka, Melka, Milenka, Milka, Milyusha, Milyushka, Milya.

Epifan
Cyrillic: Епифан. Pronunciation: yep-ee-FAHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Epiphanes, meaning “prominent” or “noble”. Patronymics: Epifanovich; Epifanovna. Diminutives: Efanya, Epifanushka, Epifanka, Epifanya, Efan, Fanya, Epifasha, Epikha, Episha, Pisha, Pifa, Epifanechka, Epifanochka, Epifasha, Epifashenka, Epifashechka, Epifashka, Epikha, Episha, Epishenka, Epishechka, Epishka, Efanechka, Efanka, Efasha, Efashka, Pifka, Pifonka, Pifochka, Pishenka, Pishechka.

Erast
Cyrillic: Эраст. Pronunciation: ehr-AST. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Erastos, meaning “beloved”. Patronymics: Erastovich; Erastovna. Diminutives: Era, Erastka, Erastushka, Erakha, Erakhta.

Eremei
Cyrillic: Еремей. Pronunciation: yeh-reem-YEY. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Iirmiyahu, meaning “God has uplifted”. Patronymics: Eremeevich; Eremeevna. Diminutives: Erya, Ema, Eremeika, Eremeyushka, Eryoma, Eryomka, Eryomochka, Eryomushka.

Ermolai
Cyrillic: Ермолай. Pronunciation: yehr-mah-LYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Hermolaos, meaning “the people of Hermes”. Patronymics: Ermolaevich; Ermolaevna. Diminutives: Ermasha, Ermolushka, Erma, Erya, Ermak, Ermol, Ermola, Ermoleika, Ermokha, Ermosha, Erema, Eryoma, Ermisha, Ermishenka, Ermishechka, Ermishka, Ermolaika, Ermolayushka, Ermolka, Ermolonka, Ermolochka, Ermoshenka, Ermoshechka, Ermoshka, Ermoshkai.

Erofei
Cyrillic: Ерофей. Pronunciation: yeh-rah-FYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Hierotheos, meaning “holy God”. Patronymics: Erofeevich; Erofeevna. Diminutives: Erofeika, Erokha, Erosha, Eronya, Eronechka, Eron’ka, Eronyushka, Erofeyushka, Erochka, Eroshen’ka, Eroshechka, Eroshka, Er’ka, Eryuta, Erya, Era.

Evdokim
Cyrillic: Евдоким. Pronunciation: yehv-da-KEEHM. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eudokimos, meaning “benevolence” or “kindness”. Patronymics: Evdokimovich; Evdokimovna. Diminutives: Aldosha, Avdosha, Evdosha, Aldya, Evdya, Aldokimushka, Aldya, Evdokimushka, Avdokimka, Aldokimka, Evdokimka, Avdokusha, Aldokusha, Evdokusha, Avdokha, Aldokha, Evdokha, Evdya, Kima, Avdokim, Aldenka, Evdenka, Aldekha, Evdekha, Aldechka, Evdechka, Aldesha, Evdesha, Aldeshka, Evdeshka, Aldokimka, Evdokimka, Aldokimochka, Evdokimochka, Aldokushenka, Evdokushenka, Aldokushechka, Evdokushechka, Aldokushka, Evdokushka, Aldokha, Evdokha, Dosha, Dushechka, Dushka, Dusenka, Dusechka, Dusik, Duska, Dusya.

Evgenii
Cyrillic: Евгений. Pronunciation: yehv-GYEH-nee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eugenios, meaning “well born”. Patronymics: Evgenievich; Evgenievna. Diminutives: Genya, Zhenya, Evgenyushka, Evgen, Vedenei, Evgenyusha, Evgenya, Evgena, Gena, Zhenyura, Zhenyusha, Zhesha, Evgekha, Evgesha, Gesha, Enya, Ena, Enyuta, Enyukha, Enyusha, Eniakha, Eniasha, Evga, Evgenechka, Evgenka, Evgekha, Evgesha, Evgeshenka, Evgeshechka, Evgeshka, Evdenka, Evdekha, Evdechka, Evdesha, Evdeshka, Evdya, Genechka, Genka, Genochka, Genushka, Geshenka, Geshechka, Geshka, Zhenechka, Zhenik, Zhenhcik, Zhensha, Zhenyurka, Zhenyurochka, Zhenyurushka, Zhenyusha, Zhenyushenka, Zhenyushechka, Zhenyushka, Zhenyai, Zhesik, Zhekha, Zhechik, Zhechka, Zhesha, Zheshechka, Zheshka, Zhek, Zheka.

Evgraf
Cyrillic: Евграф. Pronunciation: yehv-GRAHF. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eugraphos, meaning “well-written”. Patronymics: Evgrafovich; Evgrafovna. Diminutives: Evgrafka, Evgrafon’ka, Evgrafochka, Evgrafushka, Evgrashenk’ka, Evgrashechka, Evgrashka, Evgrasha, Grafa, Grafka, Grafon’ka, Grafochka, Grafunechka, Grafun’ka, Grafunyushka, Grafunya, Grafushka, Grasha, Grashen’ka, Grashechka, Grashka, Granya, Granechka, Gran’ka, Granyushka, Granyushka.

Evlampii
Cyrillic: Евлампий. Pronunciation: yehv-LAHM-pee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek eu (good) + lampe (light) meaning “good light. Patronymics: Evlamp’evich; Evlamp’evna. Diminutives: Evlampiyushka, Evlakha, Evlasha, Evlanya, Evlana, Evlanechka, Evlanka, Evlanochka, Evlan’ka, Evlashen’ka, Evlashechka, Evlashka, Lanya, Lana, Lanechka, Lanka, Lanochka, Lanushka, Lan’ka.

Evlan
Cyrillic: Евлан. Pronunciation: yehv-LAHN. Etymology: Old Russian form of Evlampii.

Evsei
Cyrillic: Евсей. Pronunciation: yehv-SYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Evsevii.

Evsevii
Cyrillic: Евсевий. Pronunciation: yehv-SYEV-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eusebios, meaning “pious”. Patronymics: Evsevievich; Evsevievna. Diminutives: Evsya, Asei, Evseika, Evsyuta, Esya, Seva, Avsei, Avseika, Avsya, Avseyushka, Avsechka, Asenka, Asechka, Aseyushka, Aska, Asya, Evstasha, Evstashenka, Evstashechka, Evstashka, Evstechka, Evstyushenka, Evstyushechka, Evstyushka, Evstya.

Evstafii
Cyrillic: Евстафий. Pronunciation: yehv-STAHF-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eustathes, meaning “steady” or “firm”. Patronymics: Evstafievich; Evstafievna. Diminutives: Astafa, Evstafa, Stafa, Astasha, Evstasha, Stasha, Evstya, Esya, Evstyunya, Evstyukha, Evstyusha, Evstafeika, Astafeika, Astafeyushka, Astakha, Astashka, Astafura, Evstaf, Evstafeyushka, Evstafka, Evstafochka, Evstafushka, Evstashka, Evstashenka, Evstashechka, Evstechka, Evstyunechka, Evstyunka, Evsya, Evstyushenka, Evstyushechka, Evstyushka, Stafik, Stafka, Stafochka, Stafushka, Stashenka, Stashechka, Stashka, Ostap, Ostapka, Ostapushka.

Evstrat
Cyrillic: Евстрат. Pronunciation: yehv-STRAHT. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eustratios, meaning “good army”. Patronymics: Evstratovich; Evstratovna. Diminutives: Alistranya, Elistranya, Evstranya, Elistratka, Alistratka, Evstratka, Strata, Evstratii, Alistratushka, Elistratushka, Evstratushka, Stratka, Stratik, Stratochka, Stratushka.

Evstratii
Cyrillic: Евстратий. Pronunciation: yehv-STRAHT-ee. Etymology: Old Russian form of Evstrat.

Evtei
Cyrillic: Евтей. Pronunciation: yehv-TYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eutheos, meaning “God is good”. Patronymics: Evteevich; Evteevna. Diminutives: Evteika, Evten’ka, Evtechka, Evteyushka, Evtyushka, Evtya.

Evtikhii
Cyrillic: Евтихий. Pronunciation: yehv-TIKH-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Eutyches, meaning “fortunate” or “lucky”. Patronymics: Evtikhievich; Evtikhievna. Diminutives: Evtikh, Evtikha, Evtisha, Evtishen’ka, Evtishechka, Evtishka, Evtya, Evtyusha, Evtyushen’ka, Evtyushechka, Evtyushka, Evtifeika, Tisha, Tishen’ka, Tishechka, Tishka.

– F –

Faddei
Cyrillic: Фаддей. Pronunciation: fahd-DYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Tadde, meaning “heart”. Patronymics: Faddeevich; Faddeevna. Diminutives: Fadya, Fadeyushka, Fadeika, Deya, Faddeika, Faddeyushka, Fadeichik, Fadenka, Fadechka, Fadik, Fadka, Deyushka, Deechka, Deika.

Fadei
Cyrillic: Фадей. Pronunciation: fahd-DYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Faddei.

Fedosei
Cyrillic: Федосей. Pronunciation: fye-dah-SYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Feodosii.

Fedosii
Cyrillic: Федосий. Pronunciation: fye-DOH-see. Etymology: Popular form of Feodosii.

Fedot
Cyrillic: Федот. Pronunciation: fye-DOHT. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theodotos, meaning “God-given”. Patronymics: Fedotovich; Fedotovna. Diminutives: Fedotka, Fedya, Dotya, Fedotii, Fedechka, Fedotik, Fedotka, Fedotonka, Fedotochka, Fedotushka, Fedka, Fedyusha, Fedyushenka, Fedyushechka, Fedyushka, Dota, Dotenka, Dotechka, Dotik.

Fedul
Cyrillic: Федул. Pronunciation: fye-DOOL. Etymology: Popular form of Feodul.

Feodor
Cyrillic: Феодор. Pronunciation: fye-OH-dawr. Etymology: Old Russian form of Fyodor.

Feodosii
Cyrillic: Феодосий. Pronunciation: fye-oh-DOH-see. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theodosius, meaning “giving to God”. Patronymics: Feodosievich; Feodosievna. Diminutives: Fedya, Fedosya, Fedosyushka, Fedosii, Fesya, Fesha, Dosya, Fedoseika, Fedenka, Fedechka, Fedosa, Fedosenka, Fedosechka, Fedoska, Fedosonka, Fedosochka, Fedosushka, Fedoska, Fedka, Fedyusha, Fedyushenka, Fedyushechka, Fedyushka, Dosenka, Dosechka, Dosik, Doska, Dosyushka.

Feodot
Cyrillic: Феодот. Pronunciation: fye-oh-DOHT. Etymology: Old Russian form of Fedot.

Feodul
Cyrillic: Феодул. Pronunciation: fye-oh-DOOL. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theodulos, meaning “slave to God”. Patronymics: Feodulovich; Feodulovna. Diminutives: Fedulka, Fedulya, Fedula, Fedulen’ka, Fedulechka, Fedulon’ka, Fedulochka, Fedulushka, Fedul’ka, Fedul’chik, Feda, Fedka, Fedochka, Dula, Dulya, Dulen’ka, Dulechka, Dulka, Dulon’ka, Dulochka, Dul’ka.

Feofan
Cyrillic: Феофан. Pronunciation: fye-oh-FAHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theophanes, meaning “manifestation of God”. Patronymics: Feofanovich; Feofanovna. Diminutives: Fofa, Fofanya, Feofantii, Feofanka, Feofanya, Fanya, Fofanya, Feofanechka, Feofanka, Feofanushka, Fofanechka, Fofanka, Fofanyushka, Fofka, Fofonka, Fofochka, Fofushka.

Feofilakt
Cyrillic: Феофилакт. Pronunciation: fye-oh-fee-LAHKT. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theophylaktos, meaning “guarded by God”. Patronymics: Feofilaktovich; Feofilaktovna. Diminutives: Filya, Filatka, Fila, Filatik, Filatochka, Filatushka, Filenka, Filechka, Filka, Filonka, Filonochka, Filonya, Filochka, Filushka, Filyusha, Filyushka, Feofilaktushka, Feofila, Feofilka, Feofilushka, Feofilochka, Feofilchik.

Feoktist
Cyrillic: Феоктист. Pronunciation: fye-ohk-TEEST. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theoktistos, meaning “founded by God”. Patronymics: Feoktistovich; Feoktistovna. Diminutives: Feoktistka, Feoktiston’ka, Feoktistochka, Feoktistushka, Feta, Feten’ka, Fetechka, Fetiska, Fetison’ka, Fetisushka, Fesha, Feshen’ka, Feshechka, Feshka, Feyusha, Feyushka, Tisa, Tiska, Tison’ka, Tisochka.

Fetis
Cyrillic: Фетис. Pronunciation: fye-TEES. Etymology: Popular form of Feoktist.

Filat
Cyrillic: Филат. Pronunciation: fee-LAHT. Etymology: Popular form of Feofilakt.

Filimon
Cyrillic: Филимон. Pronunciation: fee-lee-MOHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Philemon, meaning “to love”. Patronymics: Filimonovich; Filimonovna. Diminutives: Filya, Filimonushka, Filimonka, Filimokha, Filimosha, Filonya, Filona, Fila, Monya, Mona, Filenka, Filechka, Filimoshka, Filka, Filona, Filonechka, Filonka, Filonochka, Filushka, Filyusha, Filyushka, Monechka, Monka, Monochka, Monushka, Monyuka.

Filipp
Cyrillic: Филипп. Pronunciation: fee-LEEP. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Philippos, meaning “friend of horses”. Patronymics: Filippovich; Filippovna. Diminutives: Filya, Filippushka, Filipka, FIlka, Filko, Filyukha, Filyusha, Lipa, Filek, Filyok, Filenka, Filechka, Filipok, Filushka, Filchik, Filsha, Filyuk, Filyuka, Filyukha, Filyusha, FIlyushka, FIlyaka, Lipka.

Finogen
Cyrillic: Финоген. Pronunciation: fye-nah-GYEHN. Etymology: Popular form of Afinogen.

Filon
Cyrillic: Филон. Pronunciation: fee-LOHN. Etymology: Popular form of Filimon.

Firs
Cyrillic: Фирс. Pronunciation: FEERS. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Thyrsos, meaning “stalk” or “shaft”. Patronymics: Firsovich; Firsovna. Diminutives: Firsushka, Firsanya, Firsanechka, Firsan’ka, Sanya, Sanechka, Sanchik, Sansha, San’ka, Sanyushka.

Flor
Cyrillic: Флор. Pronunciation: FLOHR. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Flos, meaning “flower”. Patronymics: Florovich; Florovna. Diminutives: Frolushka, Khrol, Frolka, Frolak, Frolushka, Khrolak, Khrolka, Khrulyok, Khrulek, Flora, Lora, Flyora, Flyorka, Flyoronka, Flyorochka, Flyorushka, Florii, Florik, Floronka, Florochka, Florushka.

Fofan
Cyrillic: Фофан. Pronunciation: foh-FAHN. Etymology: Popular form of Feofan.

Foka
Cyrillic: Фока. Pronunciation: FOH-kah. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Phoke, meaning “seal”. Patronymics: Fokich; Fokichna. Diminutives: Fokei, Fokanya, Fokanyushka, Fokushka, Fochka, Fokeika, Fokanechka, Fokanka, Fokanya, Fokeyushka, Fokochka, Fokushka, Fochka.

Fokan
Cyrillic: Фокан. Pronunciation: foh-KAHN. Etymology: Popular form of Foka.

Foma
Cyrillic: Фома. Pronunciation: fah-MAH. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Te’oma, meaning “twin”. Patronymics: Fomich; Fominichna. Diminutives: Fomka, Fomonka, Fomochka, Fomushka, Fomchik, Khomka, Khomonka, Khomochka, Khomushka.

Fotei
Cyrillic: Фотей. Pronunciation: fah-TYEY. Etymology: Popular form of Fotii.

Fotii
Cyrillic: Фотий. Pronunciation: fah-TEE Etymology: Russian form of Greek Phos, meaning “light”. Patronymics: Fotievich; Fotievna. Diminutives: Fotya, Fatya, Fatusha, Fotyan, Fatyusha, Foteika, Fatenka, Fatechka, Fatka, Fotenka, Foteyushka, Fotenochka, Fotinushka, Fotka, Fotyusha, Fotusha, Khotya, Khotusha, Khotyusha, Khotina, Khotinka, Khotinochka.

Frol
Cyrillic: Фрол. Pronunciation: FROHL. Etymology: Popular form of Flor.

Fyodor
Cyrillic: Фёдор. Pronunciation: FYOW-dawr. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Theodoros, meaning “gift of God”. Patronymics: Fyodorovich; Fyodorovna. Diminutives: Fedya, Fedka, Fedyushka, Fedyukha, Fedorka, Feodorka, Fedyuka, Fedyulya, Fedulya, Fedyunya, Fedunya, Dyunya, Fedyusya, Fedusya, Dyusya, Dusya, Fedyusha, Fedusha, Fedushka, Fedyaika, Fedyaka, Fedyanya, Fedyakha, Fedyasha, Fedr, Fedukh, Feduk, Feda, Fedan, Fedanka, Fedets, Fedechka, Fedik, Fedorochka, Fedorushka, Fedulenka, Fedulechka, Fedulka, Fedulonka, Fedulochka, Fedulushka, Fedulka, Fedulchik, Fedun, Fedunechka, Fedunchik, Fedunka, Fedunsha, Fedunyushka, Fedusenka, Fedusechka, Fedusik, Feduska, Fedchik, Fedkai, Fedsha, Fedyuka, Fedyulenka, Fedyulechka, Fedyulka, Fedyulka, Fedyunechka, Fedyunchik, Fedyunka, Fedyunsha, Fedyunyusha, Fedyusenka, Fedyusechka, Fedyusik, Fedyuska, Fedyushenka, Fedyushechka, Fedyaga, Fedyai, Fedyanechka, Fedyanka, Fedyanyushka, Fedyara, Fedyarka, Fedyashenka, Fedyashechka, Fedyashka, Dusenka, Dusechka, Dusik, Duska, Dyunka, Dyusechka.

– G –

Garasim
Cyrillic: Гарасим. Pronunciation: gah-RAH-seem. Etymology: Popular form of Gerasim.

Gavriil
Cyrillic: Гавриил. Pronunciation: gahv-ree-EEL. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Gabriel, meaning “strong man of God”. Patronymics: Gavriilovich; Gavriilovna. Diminutives: Gavrilo, Gavrilka, Gavrya, Gavryunya, Gavryusya, Gavryukha, Gavryusha, Ganya, Ganyusya, Ganyukha, Ganyusha, Gaganya, Gavsha, Gasha, Gavran, Gavrenka, Gavrechka, Gavrik, Gavrilets, Gavrilka, Gavrilok, Gavrilochka, Gavrilushka, Gavrilyuk, Gavrosh, Gavrusya, Gavrusha, Gavryunechka, Gavryunka, Gavryusenka, Gavryusechka, Gavryuska, Gavryukha, Gavryushka, Gavryushenka, Gavryushechka, Gaga, Gaganechka, Gaganka, Ganyok, Ganyuska, Ganyushenka, Ganyushechka, Ganyushka, Gashenka, Gashechka, Gashka, Havrila, Havryusha, Havryusya, Havrilo, Havrilka, Havrya, Havryunya, Havryukha, Hanya, Hanyusya, Hanyukha, Hanyusha, Hahanya, Havsha, Hasha, Havran, Havrenka, Havrechka, Havrik, Havrilets, Havrilka, Havrilok, Havrilochka, Havrilushka, Havrilyuk, Havrosh, Havrusya, Havrusha, Havryunechka, Havryunka, Havryusenka, Havryusechka, Havryuska, Havryukha, Havryushka, Havryushenka, Havryushechka, Haha, Hahanechka, Hahanka, Hanyok, Hanyuska, Hanyushenka, Hanyushechka, Hanyushka, Hashenka, Hashechka, Hashka.

Gavrila
Cyrillic: Гаврила. Pronunciation: gahv-REE-lah. Etymology: Popular form of Gavriil.

Gavrilo
Cyrillic: Гаврило. Pronunciation: gahv-REE-lah. Etymology: Old Russian form of Gavriil.

Georgii
Cyrillic: Георгий. Pronunciation: gyeh-AWR-geey. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Georgos, meaning “farmer”. Patronymics: Eleferievich; Eleferievna. Diminutives: Egorushka, Egorii, Egorka, Gora, Gorya, Zhora, Egonya, Egosha, Gosha, Goshunya, Egunya, Gunya, Gora, Egonechka, Egonka, Egora, Egorek, Egoryok, Egorik, Egoronka, Egorsha, Egoshenka, Egoshechka, Egoshka, Egunechka, Egunka, Gorga, Gorgochka, Gorenka, Gorechka, Gorik, Gorka, Goronka, Gorochka, Gorushka, Gorsha, Gotenka, Gotechka, Gotik, Gotka, Gotya, Goshenka, Goshechka, Goshka, Goshok, Goshulya, Era, Goshunechka, Goshunchik, Goshunka, Gulenka, Gulechka, Gulka, Gulyushka, Gulya, Gunechka, Gunka, Gunyusha, Gerka, Gesha, Geshenka, Geshechka, Geshka, Zhorzh, Zhorzhenka, Zhora, Zhorzhik, Zhorik, Zhorka, Zhoronka, Zhorochka, Zhorya.

Gerasim
Cyrillic: Герасим. Pronunciation: gyeh-RAH-seem. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Gerasimos, meaning “old” or “honour”. Patronymics: Gerasimovich; Gerasimovna. Diminutives: Gerasya, Rasya, Gera, Geranya, Gesha, Garasya, Garsha, Geranechka, Geranka, Geranya, Gerasenka, Gerasechka, Geraska, Gerka, Gerasimushka, Gerasimka, Geronka, Gerochka, Rasenka, Rasechka, Raska, Herasim, Herasya, Herasimushka, Hera, Heranya, Hesha, Harasya, Harsha, Heranechka, Heranka, Heranya, Herasenka, Heraska, Herka, Herasimka, Heronka, Herochka.

Gleb
Cyrillic: Глеб. Pronunciation: GLYEB. Etymology: Russian form of the Old Norse name Gudleifr, which meant “heir of god”. Patronymics: Glebovich; Glebovna. Diminutives: Glebka, Glebochka, Glebonka, Glebushka.

Gordei
Cyrillic: Гордей. Pronunciation: gahr-DYEY. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Gordios, a Phrygian name possibly meaning “city” or “town”. Patronymics: Gordeevich; Gordeevna. Diminutives: Gordeika, Gordechka, Gordya, Gordyunya, Gordyukha, Gordyusha, Gordeyushka, Gordyunechka, Gordyun’ka, Gordyushen’ka, Gordyushechka, Gorka.

Grigorii
Cyrillic: Григорий. Pronunciation: gree-GAW-ree. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Gregorios, meaning “watchful” or “alert”. Patronymics: Grigor’evich; Grigor’evich. Diminutives: Grisha, Hrisha, Grishenka, Grishko, Grishaka, Grishuka, Grishanya, Grishata, Grishonya, Grishunya, Grishuta, Grishukha, Grinya, Grinyuka, Grinyukha, Grinyusha, Grika, Gorya, Gora, Grigora, Grigorik, Grigorka, Grigoronka, Grigorochka, Grigorushka, Grigorchik, Grigoryushka, Grigorya, Grina, Grinek, Grinyok, Grinchik, Grinka, Grinko, Grinsha, Grinyushka, Grikha, Grishai, Grishak, Grishan, Grishanechka, Grishanka, Grishanyushka, Grishata, Grishatka, Grishatok, Grishatochka, Grishachok, Grishechka, Grishka, Grishok, Grishonya, Grishuk, Grishuka, Gritsa, Grishunechka, Grishunchik, Grishunka, Grishunyushka, Grishutka, Grishutik, Grishutonka, Grishutochka, Gritsko, Gorenka, Gorechka, Gorik, Gorka, Goronka, Gorochka, Hrishko, Hrishaka, Hrishuka, Hrishanya, Hrishata, Hrishonya, Hrinko, Hrishunya, Hrishuta, Hrishukha, Hrinya, Hrinyuka, Hrinyukha, Hrinyusha, Hrika, Horya, Hora, Hrigora, Hrigorik, Hrigorka, Hrinka, Hrigoronka, Hrihorochka, Hrihorushka, Hrihorchik, Hrihoryushka, Hrihorya, Hrina, Hrinek, Hrinyok, Hrinchik, Hrinsha, Hrishatok, Hrinyushka, Hrikha, Hrishai, Hrishak, Hrishan, Hrishanechka, Hrishanka, Hrishanyushka, Hrishata, Hrishatka, Hrishatochka, Hrishachok, Hrishenka, Hrishechka, Hrishka, Hrishok, Hrishonya, Hrishuk, Hrishuka, Hrishunechka, Hrishunchik, Hrishunka, Hrishunyushka, Hrishutka, Hrishutonka, Hrishutochka, Hritsko, Hritsa, Horenka, Horechka, Horik, Horka, Horonka, Horochka.

Gurii
Cyrillic: Гурий. Pronunciation: GOO-ree. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Gur, meaning “young lion”. Patronymics: Gurievich; Gurievna. Diminutives: Gur’yushka, Gura, Gurya, Gur’yanka, Gureika, Guren’ka, Gurechka, Gureyushka, Gurka, Guron’ka, Gurochka, Gurushka, Gur’ka, Gur’yusha, Gur’yanushka.

– H –

Havrila
Cyrillic: Гаврила. Pronunciation: hahv-REE-lah. Etymology: South Russian form of Gavriil.

Herasim
Cyrillic: Герасим. Pronunciation: hyeh-RAH-seem. Etymology: South Russian form of Gerasim.

Hryhory
Cyrillic: Григорий. Pronunciation: hree-HAW-ree. Etymology: South Russian form of Grigorii.

– I –

Iakim
Cyrillic: Иаким. Pronunciation: ee-ah-KEEM. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Jenoiachin, meaning “established by God”. Patronymics: Iakimovich; Iakimovna. Diminutives: Akimusha, Akimushka, Akimka, Kima, Iakimka, Akimok, Akimonka, Akimochka, Akimushka, Akimchik, Akisha, Akishechka, Akishka, Kim, Kimka, Kimonka, Kimochka, Kimushka.

Ignat
Cyrillic: Игнат. Pronunciation: eeg-NAHT. Etymology: Popular form of Ignatii.

Ignatii
Cyrillic: Игнатий. Pronunciation: eeg-NAHT-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Latin Ignatius, possibly meaning “fire”. Patronymics: Ignatievich; Ignatievna. Diminutives: Ignasha, Ignashenka, Ignatka, Ignat, Ignakha, Igonya, Igosha, Ignatik, Ignatok, Ignatushka, Ignachok, Ignashechka, Ignashka, Igonechka, Igonka, Igonyushka, Igonya, Igosha, Igoshenka, Igoshechka.

Igor’
Cyrillic: Игорь. Pronunciation: EE-gahr. Etymology: Russian form of Old Norse name Ingvarr, derived from the name of the Germanic god Ing + arr meaning “warrior”. Patronymics: Igorevich; Igorevna. Diminutives: Gosha, Igorka, Igorek, Igoryok, Igoryasha, Igorasha, Igoryukha, Igoryusha, Gorya, Gora, Igosha, Goga, Gotya, Igulya, Gulya, Igusya, Gusya, Ira, Igorashka, Igorek, Igoryok, Igorekha, Igoryokha, Gorik, Igorechek, Igoryochek, Igorii, Igorushka, Igorusha, Igoryushenka, Igoryushechka, Igoryushka, Igoryasha, Igulenka, Igulechka, Igulka, Igusenka, Igusechka, Igusik, Iguska, Gogonka, Gogochka, Gorka, Goshenka, Goshechka, Goshka, Gotenka, Gustya, Gotechka, Gotik, Gotka, Gulenka, Gulechka, Gulka, Gulyushka, Gusik, Gusenka, Gusechka, Gustenka, Gustechka, Guska.

Ilarion
Cyrillic: Иларион. Pronunciation: ee-lahr-ee-YOHN. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Hilarion, meaning “cheerful”. Patronymics: Ilarionovich; Ilarionovna. Diminutives: Ilarionka, Ila, Ilarionushka, Ilarechka, Ilarka, Ilarochka, Ilarushka, Ilaryushka, Ilka, Larya, Larionushka, Laryonka, Laryokha, Laryosha, Lara, Laryukha, Laryusha, Larivon, Larek, Laryok, Larionok, Larenok, Larenka, Larechka, Larik, Laryosik, Laryoshenka, Larioshka, Larka, Laronka, Larochka.

Il’ya
Cyrillic: Илья. Pronunciation: EEL-yah. Etymology: Russian form of Hebrew Elijah, meaning “my God is Yahweh”. Patronymics: Il’ich; Il’inichna. Diminutives: Ilyusha, Ilichka, Ilyukha, Ilyakha, Ilyusya, Lyusya, Ilyunya, Lyunya, Lyulya, Ilei, Ileika, Ilenka, Ilechka, Ilonka, Ilochka, Ilka, Ilko, Ilyushenka, Ilyushechka, Ilyushka, Ilyaka, Ilyuk, Ilyunka, Ilyusenka, Ilyusechka, Ilyusik, Ilyuska, Ilyatochka, Lyunenka, Lyunechka, Lyunka, Lyusenka, Lyusechka, Lyusik, Lyuska.

Ioann
Cyrillic: Иоанн. Pronunciation: ee-ah-AHN. Etymology: Old Russian form of Ivan.

Ioannikii
Cyrillic: Иоанникий. Pronunciation: ee-ah-ohn-NEE-kee. Etymology: Old Russian form of Anikii.

Ioil’
Cyrillic: Иоиль. Pronunciation: ee-OYL. Etymology: Russian form of Biblical Joel, derived from Hebrew Yo’el, meaning “Yahweh is God”. Patronymics: Ioilevich; Ioilevna. Diminutives: Ilya, Ilen’ka, Ilechka, Il’ka, Ivol’ka, Ivolya.

Iosif
Cyrillic: Иосиф. Pronunciation: ee-YO-seef. Etymology: Russian form of Biblical Joseph, derived from Hebrew Iosef, meaning “he will add”. Patronymics: Iosifovich; Iosifovna. Diminutives: Osya, Osa, Osipushka, Osipka, Iosya, Osenka, Osechka, Osik, Osipka, Osyanka, Oshka, Oska, Iosenka, Iosechka, Ioska.

Iov
Cyrillic: Иов. Pronunciation: ee-OHV. Etymology: Russian form of Biblical Job, derived from Hebrew Iiov, meaning “persecuted” or “hated”. Patronymics: Iovich; Iovna. Diminutives: Iosha, Ioshen’ka, Ioshechka, Ioshka, Iv, Iva, Ivka, Ivon’ka, Ivochka, Ivushka, Ova, Ovka, Ovon’ka, Ovochka.

Ipat
Cyrillic: Ипат. Pronunciation: ee-PAHT. Etymology: Popular form of Ipat.

Ipatii
Cyrillic: Ипатий. Pronunciation: ee-PAHT-ee. Etymology: Russian form of Greek Hypatios, meaning “highest” or “supreme”. Patrony