Yorkton and Area Doukhobor Historical Tour

For Immediate Release – June 30, 2010

On Sunday, June 27, 2008, the National Heritage Doukhobor Village hosted its fifth annual guided motor coach tour of Doukhobor historical sites and points of interest – this year in Yorkton, Saskatchewan and surrounding areas. Approximately sixty people took part in the excursion, which travelled through the Canora, Hamton, Ebenezer, Yorkton, Insinger and Sheho areas, visiting a number of heritage buildings and structures built by the Doukhobor Community as part of its trading, industrial and commercial activities in the areas in the early twentieth century.

Group photo of tour participants at Insinger, SK.  Photo courtesy Keith & Sonya Tarasoff.

“While the Doukhobor Community is largely remembered as an agricultural organization, few people today are aware of its achievements as a commercial enterprise, and the impact it had on the development of the surrounding area”, said Jonathan J. Kalmakoff, Doukhobor historian and tour co-organizer.

In the Teens and Twenties, the Doukhobor communal organization known as the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood (CCUB) was at the height of material achievement as a trading, industrial, agricultural and forestry enterprise in Saskatchewan. It had landholdings totaling over 30,000 acres in the province on which were built numerous communal villages, sawmills, flour mills, grain elevators, brickworks, trading stores, warehouses, roads, ferries and bridges, as well as cultivated crops and market gardens. The Community also hired itself out to perform large construction contracts. Underpinning the success of the organization was a membership of over fifteen hundred Doukhobor men who provided a large, readily-mobilized labour force guided by the slogan “Toil and Peaceful Life”.

The Fort Pelly Trail circa 1907.  The ox-cart trail ran in a south-westerly direction from Fort Pelly, through the Doukhobor village settlements and the Ebenezer district, to Yorkton.

The Yorkton & Area Doukhobor Historical Tour commenced at the Doukhobor Prayer Home in Canora at 9:00 a.m. with greetings and introductory remarks by Keith Tarasoff, chairman of the National Heritage Doukhobor Village and tour co-organizer.

The tour visited the site of the Doukhobor Block, a complex of buildings on 2nd Avenue East in Canora built, owned and operated by the Doukhobor Community. These included a large trading store (1910); annex (1912); storage warehouse (1916); workers residence (1913); and livery barn (1913). The trading store (known today as the Lunn Hotel) still stands and is the oldest and largest Doukhobor-built building still in use in Canada. The tour then stopped on Railway Avenue at the site of a 60,000-bushel grain elevator built for hire by the Doukhobor Community in 1912.

The Doukhobor Trading Store (now the Lunn Hotel) on 2nd Avenue East in Canora, SK.  Built by the CCUB in 1910, it is the oldest and largest Doukhobor building in Canada still in use. Photo courtesy Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

The tour proceeded to Hamton and visited the site of the communal farm settlement known as Burtsevo, which from 1907 to 1918 served as a stopping point for Doukhobor wagon teams travelling between Veregin and Yorkton on the Fort Pelly Trail. Because it was a day trip each way by horse and wagon, the Doukhobor Community purchased this section farm along the trail so that they would have a place to stop and rest their horses. The original house, trading store and Doukhobor-made brick-lined wells on the property are still there to see.

The Burtsevo farmhouse, Hamton, SK.  Built by the CCUB in 1907, it was a stopping place for Doukhobor wagon teams travelling between Veregin and Yorkton on the Fort Pelly Trail. Photo courtesy Al and Bernice Makowsky.

Continuing south, the tour followed the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway line, built for hire by the Doukhobor Community in 1910. The 30-mile branch line – still in use today – connected the towns of Canora and Yorkton and resulted in the creation of several new centres along the way, including the hamlets of Burgis, Gorlitz, Hamton and Ebenezer.

The tour stopped at Ebenezer, where the Doukhobor Community was hired to construct a 25,000-bushel grain elevator (1910); a two-story brick general store, adjoining brick business building and residence known as the ‘Border Block’ (1911); a two-story brick home and cinderblock barn (1911); and a two-story brick hotel, adjoining brick business building and residence known as the ‘Janzen Block’ (1920). The latter three buildings are still standing. The Doukhobor Community itself owned 20 lots in the hamlet (1910) and built a large barn on the outskirts of Ebenezer (1914) for use as a stopping point for Doukhobor wagon teams travelling on the Fort Pelly Trail.

The Janzen Block in Ebenezer, SK, built by the CCUB in 1920. Photo courtesy Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

The tour proceeded to Yorkton and visited the site of the large brick factory on Dracup Avenue owned and operated by the Doukhobor Community from 1905-1925. The factory, which produced up to 50,000 bricks a day, supplied millions of bricks for building projects across Western Canada. The factory was dismantled in 1940; however, three original structures – dwelling houses for the factory workers – are still standing. The tour then passed a number of Yorkton buildings constructed of Doukhobor brick including: three two-story homes on Fifth Avenue North; the Blackstone Hotel (today known as the City Limits Inn), a large two-story brick structure on Betts Avenue built and owned by the Doukhobor Community (1935); and six dwelling houses on Myrtle Avenue – three of which are still standing – built and owned by the Doukhobor Community (1932). In 1990, one of these homes was purchased by the City of Yorkton for preservation as a heritage site to commemorate the history of the Doukhobors in Yorkton.

The Blackstone Hotel (now the City Limits Inn) on Betts Avenue in Yorkton, SK, built by the CCUB in 1935. 

Photo courtesy Jonthan J. Kalmakoff.

The tour stopped at Jaycee Beach Park where, following the Lord’s Prayer recited in Russian, the tour participants enjoyed a picnic lunch and rest stop.

One of six dwelling houses built by the CCUB on Myrtle Avenue in Yorkton, SK in 1932. Three remain today. Photo courtesy Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

The tour then resumed and continued to Sheho, where it visited the site of the communal farm settlement known as Blagodatnoye. From 1907 to 1926, the farm supplied the Doukhobor Community with wood to fire the kilns at the Yorkton brick factory. As the heavily treed farm was cleared by Doukhobor work crews, the trees were cut into cordwood and shipped by rail to Yorkton and the cleared land was farmed. At Blagodatnoye, the Doukhobor Community built a large two-story brick dwelling house along with a large wooden barn and numerous outbuildings, none of which remain today. A small Doukhobor cemetery still exists at the site.

The large two-story brick communal home built by the CCUB in Sheho in 1907.  It was demolished in 1982. Photo courtesy Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

The tour then proceeded to Insinger, where it visited the site of another communal farm settlement. From 1907 to 1928, this heavily treed farm also supplied the Doukhobor Community with firewood for its Yorkton brickworks. As the land was cleared, the trees were cut into cordwood and transported to Yorkton by rail, and the cleared land was farmed. Here also, the Doukhobor Community built a large two-story brick dwelling house which is still standing and is in the process of being renovated. It is the last structure of its kind left in Saskatchewan.

The large two-story brick communal home built by the CCUB in Insinger in 1907.  Currently under renovation, it is the last remaining structure of its kind in Saskatchewan.  Photo courtesy Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

On the return leg, the tour stopped in Theodore at the residence of Pauline Lapitsky. There, tour participants enjoyed Doukhobor song singing by the combined Saskatchewan choir members along with tour participants from Alberta and Manitoba, followed by lunch and refreshments. The tour concluded in Canora at 5:00 p.m.

Throughout the eight-hour excursion, Jonathan J. Kalmakoff served as tour guide, sharing his wealth of knowledge about the history of the places and people. Tour participants also shared a number of interesting stories and anecdotes.

“Many of the tour participants were amazed at what we were able to show them,” said Keith Tarasoff. “Few were aware of the scope of Doukhobor commercial activity in the area, and fewer yet knew about the legacy of buildings and structures they left”.

For additional information or inquiries about Doukhobor historic sites in Yorkton and the surrounding area, visit the Doukhobor Genealogy Website at www.doukhobor.org and the National Heritage Doukhobor Village website at www.ndhv.ca.

Day-trip to Piers Island: Reminiscing About the Penitentiary, 1932-1935

by Gunter Schaarschmidt

From 1932 to 1935, over 600 Sons of Freedom were interred in a special penitentiary built on Piers Island in the Strait of Georgia between Vancouver Island and the mainland Pacific coast of British Columbia, Canada. Seventy-three years later, on June 17, 2008, Dr. Gunter Schaarschmidt of the University of Victoria returned to Piers Island and visited some of the physical features left from the penitentiary camp site. The following is an account of his observations and photos from his excursion. Reproduced by permission from ISKRA No. 2011 (Grand Forks, USCC, October 3, 2008).

On June 17, 2008, the University of Victoria Retirees Association organized a day-trip to Piers Island just 0.8 km (about half a mile) northwest of the Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal on the Saanich Peninsula on Vancouver Island. The island is inhabited by some 300 people many of whom live there for only part of the year. The island is accessible only by private boat – there are no roads except a dirt circle dirt road and walking trails criss-crossing the island. There are no stores but there is a Fire Station and an emergency helicopter landing site. For the retirees group one of its members and an island resident had chartered the harbour ferry that is normally used for Eco-trips from the pier at the end of Beacon Avenue in Sidney. The group assembled in the Piers Island parking lot next to the Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal and was ferried to the island in two trips. One of the trips arrived at a southern pier across from the ferry terminal, the other at the pier of the property that had been built on the same site as the Penitentiary for the Sons of Freedom (svobodniki), a radical group of Doukhobors, on the north side of the Island.

Plan of Piers Island, British Columbia. Note the Doukhobor penitentiary was located on ten acres in the northwest corner of the island, off of Satellite Channel.

Why was there a need for the creation of the Penitentiary on Piers Island for the Sons of Freedom, far away from their area of settlement in 1908? First of all, one must clearly differentiate between the group of Freedomite Doukhobors (svobodniki) and the Doukhobors as a whole, a pacifist philosophical movement. Lest it be thought that the group of Freedomites are all extreme anarchists, “there are many sincere and creative personalities in the group” (see Tarasoff 2002:93 who devotes an entire section to some of them on pp. 93-98). In fact, the Freedomite group has been very productive in writing diaries and autobiographies (see Rak 2004:115-142).

Figure 1. The old pier post of the camp (the new pier is farther to the right out of range of the photograph). Photo by Gunter Schaarschmidt.

An excerpt from a government document describes the establishment of the camp in part as follows (HWC/WJ 1934:1):

In May and June, 1932, at Nelson and Grand Forks, B.C., 303 males and 285 females of the faction above-named (”the Sons of Freedom faction of the Doukhobor sect”) were convicted of having publicly displayed themselves in a nude condition, and were sentenced to three years imprisonment in the British Columbia Penitentiary.
There being no accommodation for these convicts at the New Westminster Institution, arrangements were made to construct a temporary penitentiary at Piers Island, British Columbia.

Figure 2. Another view of the old pier post. Photo by Gunter Schaarschmidt.

The incarceration of the Freedomites proceeded in 18 escorted parties consisting of between 9 and 40 individuals, from August 11, 1932, to December 22, 1932. None of them served their full sentence of three years. No doubt the most important reason for their early release was a cost-saving effort in the difficult economic situation of the Depression years in Canada (see Skolrood 1995:27). Rationalizing, the warden H.W. Cooper wrote on June 20, 1934 (HWC/WJ 1934:13):

The object of the Administration has been to induce in the Sons of Freedom , confidence in Canada and Canadian ways so that upon their release they will be better citizens of the Dominion. There are signs that this has, to some extent, been attained.

Figure 3. View from the former campsite to the new pier post looking out to the NE. Photo by Gunter Schaarschmidt.

However, others do not quite see it that way stating that “their (the Sons of Freedom) attitudes were unchanged, in fact, their resolve to disobey the state was enhanced by a consciousness of martyrdom achieved at comparatively little person discomfort” (Woodcock & Avakumovic 1968:318).

The release of the Sons of Freedom proceeded in various stages – the last group of about 30 men was transferred to the New Westminster penitentiary before June, 1935. The camp was then demolished for the most part except the wharf and two buildings that had housed the penitentiary officers and matrons.

Figure 4. The owner’s flag post of property No. 119 is on the same spot as the old camp flag post. Photo by Gunter Schaarschmidt.

Of the University of Victoria retirees group visiting the island in June this year, not many knew about the “Doukhobor period”. It is, however, well remembered by the residents of Piers Island. In fact, on a small table with other information about the island, our host had placed a photograph of the campsite with the sign “Piers Island Penitentiary” attached to the pier post. This had apparently been given to him by the real estate agent at the time of the purchase of the property. Skolrood’s book (click here to read Doukhobor chapter) has a full page of photographs accompanying his chapter entitled “The Doukhobor Period, 1932-1935” (Skolrood 1995:14-32). This is a chapter well worth reading for anyone interested in the history of the Doukhobor movement as seen from the perspective of a former resident of Piers Island.

Figure 5. Rear view of the camp site (now property No. 119). Photo by Gunter Schaarschmidt.

Included are four photographs that I took of some of the physical features left from the penitentiary camp site. There is first and foremost the old pier post in Figures 1 and 2 (but without the sign “Piers Island Penitentiary”). Figure 3 shows today’s pier looking out to the NE. Then, there is the site of the camp flag post now marked by the owner’s maple-leaf flag (Figure 4). And, finally, there is the rear view of the new owner’s property which for some reason evoked in me the sight of the former women’s compound (Figure 5). Mentally, I had the eerie feeling of Doukhobor voices united in song in the beautiful surroundings of the camp whose barbed-wire fencing no doubt prevented the camp inhabitants from enjoying the scenery as much as we visitors were able to do more than three quarters of a century later.

References

  • HWC/WJ (1934). Piers Island Penitentiary (Memorandum from H.W.Cooper, Warden, British Columbia Penitentiary, to Superintendent of Penitentiaries, Ottawa).
  • Rak, Julie (2004). Negotiated Memory: Doukhobor Autobiographical Discourse. Vancouver/Toronto: UBC Press.
  • Skolrood, A. Harold (1995). Piers Island: A Brief History of the Island and Its People 1886-1993. Lethbridge, Alberta: Paramount Printers.
  • Tarasoff, Koozma J. (2002). Spirit Wrestlers: Doukhobor Pioneers’ Strategies for Living. Ottawa: LEGAS/Spirit Wrestler Publishing.
  • Woodcock, George & Ivan Avakumovic (1968). The Doukhobors. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

Notes

To read about Gunter Schaarschmidt’s research about the Doukhobor dialect spoken in Canada, see Four Norms – One Culture: Doukhobor Russian in Canada and also English for Doukhobors: 110 Years of Russian-English Contact in Canada.  For his translations of 19th century German articles about the Doukhobors, see The Dukhobortsy in Transcaucasia, 1854-1856 by Heinrich Johann von Paucker and Doukhobors in the Caucasus, 1863-1864 by Alexander Petzholdt.

Library and Archives Canada and the Doukhobor Genealogy Website Announce Strategic Partnership

For Immediate Release – July 10, 2008

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) and Jonathan J. Kalmakoff, creator of the Doukhobor Genealogy Website, the largest Doukhobor family history website, announced today a strategic partnership to make more resources accessible to Canadians interested in online Doukhobor family research.

Initially, Kalmakoff and LAC will focus on identifying the significant amount of Doukhobor archival material held at LAC. The material, covering 1899 to the present, includes thousands of government records, private manuscript collections, books, reports, periodicals, newspapers, photographs, and sound and video recordings. The result will be a thematic guide to help locate the material and assist in general research. The thematic guide will be available free of charge at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy as well as at www.doukhobor.org.

In addition to the thematic guide to Doukhobor records, LAC and Kalmakoff will develop a specialized web page for Doukhobor genealogy at www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy. The specialized web page will be designed for those who wish to undertake genealogical research on their Doukhobor ancestors. It will provide an overview of select sources and tips for doing effective Doukhobor genealogical research while avoiding numerous pitfalls.

Jonathan J. Kalmakoff, creator of the Doukhobor Genealogy Website and Sylvie Tremblay, head of the Canadian Genealogy Centre, Library and Archives Canada, discuss the strategic partnership in Ottawa.

The Doukhobors are a Christian group that originated in Russia in the 17th century. They were persecuted in Tsarist Russia for their religious beliefs, which included pacifism, egalitarianism and communal ownership. In 1899, over 7,500 Doukhobors immigrated to Western Canada. There, they formed large communal farming enterprises. Today an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 Doukhobors live in Canada with a similar number living in Russia and the Former Soviet Republics.

“I am pleased to be partnering with LAC to provide guidance and direction to Doukhobor family researchers,” said Kalmakoff. “There is a wealth of records that can help those researching their Doukhobor roots understand their past. Being able to find, locate and use them is absolutely essential.”

About the Doukhobor Genealogy Website

The Doukhobor Genealogy Website is the leading online site for Doukhobor family history. It contains research guides and indices of Doukhobor archival materials in Canada and elsewhere and offers comprehensive glossaries of Doukhobor names and naming practices, geography, maps and place names, in addition to a wealth of historical texts and English translations of Russian sources. The creator, researcher and writer Jonathan J. Kalmakoff is a leading authority on Doukhobor genealogy and history. His publications are essential works for the study of Doukhobor family history. For more information, visit www.doukhobor.org.

About Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada collects and preserves Canada’s documentary heritage, and makes it accessible to all Canadians. This heritage includes publications, archival records, sound and audio-visual materials, photographs, artworks, and electronic documents such as websites. The Canadian Genealogy Centre (www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/genealogy) includes all physical and online genealogical services of Library and Archives Canada. It offers genealogical content, services, advice, research tools and opportunities to work on joint projects, all in both official languages.

Media contacts:

Sylvie Tremblay
Library and Archives Canada
613-992-1638
Sylvie.Tremblay@lac-bac.gc.ca

Jonathan J. Kalmakoff
Doukhobor Genealogy Website
306-569-0074
Contact Jonathan

Good Spirit Lake Annex – Historical Tour

On Saturday, June 20, 2007, the National Heritage Doukhobor Village hosted a guided motor coach tour of Doukhobor historical sites, landmarks and points of interest in the Good Spirit Lake and Buchanan areas of Saskatchewan.

Approximately sixty people took part in the excursion, which travelled through the heart of “Good Spirit Country”, visiting some of the original Doukhobor village and related sites, exploring surviving buildings and structures, and learning about the Doukhobors who inhabited them, their surroundings, and the events that took place within them.

“One of the primary objectives of the tour was to emphasize the historical significance of the Doukhobor contribution to the development and growth of the area”, said Keith Tarasoff, tour organizer and chairman of the National Heritage Doukhobor Village.

Tour participants exploring the Krukoff Homestead near Good Spirit Lake.

In 1899, over 1,000 Doukhobors from Elizavetpol and Kars, Russia settled in the area on 168,930 acres of homestead land reserved by the Dominion Government for their use. The reserve was known as the “Good Spirit Lake Annex”. There, they cleared the forest, broke the virgin prairie, planted grain fields, kept livestock herds and established eight communal villages as well as gristmills, blacksmith shops, granaries and barns. Living, praying and working under the motto of “Toil and Peaceful Life”, they transformed the prairie wilderness into productive farmland. By 1918, the Annex reserve was closed as Doukhobors relocated to communal settlements in British Columbia or to individual homesteads in the area. Those who remained established successful independent farming operations and thriving businesses.

Original 1899-era barn from Blagosklonnoe Village at the Krukoff Homestead.

The tour of the Good Spirit Lake Annex departed from the Doukhobor Prayer Home in Canora at 1:00 p.m. and commenced with a visit to the Krukoff Homestead, established on the site of Blagosklonnoye Village and containing an original village barn as well as a house constructed from bricks from the original village prayer home. The tour then passed the Blagosklonnoye Cemetery site, along with the Staro-Goreloye Village and Cemetery sites, before visiting at the Hancheroff House, an original village home relocated from Staro-Goreloye to its present site in the early 1900’s. A brief stop was made at Devil’s Lake School, a main Doukhobor school in the area during the first half of the twentieth century. The tour then passed through the Kalmakovka Village and Cemetery sites, the Utesheniye Village and Cemetery sites, and the Sukovaeff House, an original village home relocated from Utesheniye to its present site in the early 1900’s. A group moleniye service and commemoration was held at Novo Troitskoye Cemetery, where a major effort is underway to restore the site and preserve the cemetery for the future. The tour then passed through the vicinity of the Novo-Troitskoye Village site and the Moiseyevo Cemetery and Village sites, where at the latter, several original village structures remain.

Tour participants conduct a moleniye service at Novo-Troitskoe Cemetery near Buchanan.

The excursion proceeded to the Village of Buchanan, the main commercial centre in the area and a significant hub of Doukhobor activity throughout much of the twentieth century. A stop was made at Lois Hole Memorial Park, which commemorates the late Lois (nee Verigin) Hole, a former Buchanan resident of Doukhobor ancestry who became a successful market gardener, prominent book publisher and Lieutenant-Governor of Alberta. Afterwards, the tour stopped at the Buchanan Community Hall where participants were treated to refreshments courtesy the Village Council and to an extensive historic photo display courtesy Lorne J. Plaxin.  The tour then resumed, passing the Plaxin & Verigin General Store site and the Buchanan Doukhobor Prayer Home, built in 1916 to serve the needs of the Doukhobors in the surrounding area. A stop was made at the foundations of the Independent Doukhobor Flour Mill and Elevator, which was built in 1916 and operated until the Forties, as well as the foundations of the Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood Store and Warehouse which operated in the Twenties and Thirties.

The tour continued west of Buchanan, where it passed the Novo-Goreloye Village and Cemetery sites, the Village of Buchanan Cemetery, the Kirilovka Village and Cemetery sites, and the site of Dernic Siding and Hamlet. On the return leg, the tour visited the Buchanan Historic Monument, located east of Buchanan along Highway No. 5. Constructed of millstones from the villages of Novo-Troitskoye and Utesheniye, it stands as a memorial to the Doukhobor pioneer settlers of the Buchanan area. As a concluding highlight, a group photo was taken in front of the monument. The tour then returned to the point of departure at 6:30 p.m.

Tour group photo at the Buchanan Historic Monument on Highway No. 5 east of Buchanan.

Throughout the five and a half-hour excursion, expert tour guides Jonathan J. Kalmakoff, a Regina-based researcher and writer and Lorne J. Plaxin, a Preeceville-based local historian, provided an informative and entertaining historical narration.  Both have family roots in the Good Spirit Lake Annex area. Tour participants also shared interesting stories and anecdotes about the people and places. These included Fred Krukoff, who spoke about the Blagosklonnoye village site while Margaret Hancheroff described the Hancheroff House from Staro-Goreloye village.  

“A lot of the people who accompanied the tour were amazed at what we were able to show them,” said Jonathan Kalmakoff. “Many presumed that there was nothing left to see, when in fact, there are plenty of existing historic sites, buildings and landmarks that people pass every day without knowing or appreciating their history or purpose. Through the tour, they were able to have an enjoyable visit, and most importantly, learn a little more about their Doukhobor heritage and culture.”

Highway map of Buchanan and Good Spirit Lake, Saskatchewan.

“It was a privilege to take part in the Good Spirit Lake Annex tour,” said Lorne Plaxin. “A profound feeling of belonging was very evident as the tour bus passed each village or cemetery site. Indeed, the recollections and anecdotes shared by many of the tour participants reminded us all of our rich heritage. We can indeed be proud of our ancestors’ accomplishments and legacy.”

For additional information or inquiries about the tour of the Good Spirit Lake Annex and other Doukhobor historic sites in Saskatchewan, contact the National Heritage Doukhobor Village at Box 99, Veregin, Saskatchewan, S0A 4H0. Phone number (306) 542-4441.

Lundbreck Cemetery Map

Map of United Doukhobors of Alberta Cemetery
Lundbreck District, Alberta

North

Jacob J.
Semenoff
Paul M.
Verigin
Jim
P.
Osachoff
Laura S.
Jmaeff
Annie H.
Verigin
Donald J.
McCabe
William S.
Kabatoff
George J.
Ewashen
Alex J.
Potapoff
Mike S.
Verigin
Anton W.
Mushta
Laura W.
Osachoff
Alex F.
Vishloff
Anastasia J.
Shkuratoff
Henry
Hakze
Christina M.
Verigin
Emma H.
Mushta
John J.
Ewashen
Mary H.
Vishloff
Mike M.
Deakoff
Anne M.
Hakze
Irene F.
Potapoff
Peter E.
Hoobanoff
Dora M.
Maloff
Paula G.
Ewashen
Pearl S.
Deakoff
William S.
Verigin
Paul N.
Potapoff
Mike N.
Berekoff
Mike W.
Shkuratoff
Anna F.
Vishloff
Mary S.
Verigin
Mike P.
Kabatoff
Olive M.
Berekoff
Alex J.
Mary P.&
Agnes
Ewashen
Willie
Stoochnoff&
Elena
Nickel
Helen
Parakin
Phillip M.
Verigin
Aksinia L.
Salekin
Nastia J.
Semenoff
Alex M.
Salekin
Margaret
Sukurukoff
Peter J.&
Helen J.
Parakin
Paul N.
Faminow
Anastasia G.
Konkin
George M.
Deakoff
Lawrence G.
Deakoff
Fenya E.
Holoboff
Anna W.
Kalmakoff
Malasha T.
Faminow
Anastasia H.
Verigin
John W.
Verigin
Anastasia S.
Ewashen
Shirley
Zumik
Fred W.
Semenoff
Cecil P. &
Dora M.
Hoobanoff
Mabel J.
Semenoff
John G.&
Vera K.
Maloff
Anastasia P.
Maloff
Mary M.
Maloff
George N.
Maloff
Dora C.
Maloff
Peter C.
Maloff
Helen J.
Semenoff
Joseph J.
Semenoff
Mary
Ribalkin
George G.
Maloff
William P.
Stoochnoff
Helen J.
Faminoff
William A.
Vishloff
Harry H.
Konkin
William E.
Ribalkin
William W.
Rebalkin
Peter G.
Pudmaroff
Mabel E.
Faminoff
Martha F.
Faminoff
Nastia G.
Verigin
Joseph P.
Faminoff

Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood Cemetery Map

Map of Christian Community of Universal
Brotherhood Cemetery
Arrowwood District, Alberta

North

W.W.
Androsoff
Fanny
Planidin
Mabel
Androsoff
George
Plotnikoff
Paul
Planidin
Helen
Planidin
Wasilisa
Zarchikova
Polly
Planidin
Paul P.
Planidin
John
Anutooshkin
Avdotia F.
Verigin
Dora
Malloff
Mary A.
Currey
Harry
Sherbackoff
Mavra
Verigin
Mary
Hlookoff
John
Malloff
Mabel
Markin
Fred
Popoff
Mabel
Sherbackoff
John A.
Malakoff
Mary
Popoff
Nastasia
Chernenkoff
Eli
P.
Holoboff
Andrei
Anutooshkin
Anna
Holoboff
Peter
Holoboff
Edna
Androsoff
Willie
Zaytsoff
Tanya E.
Candrashowa
Winnie
Holoboff
John W.
Androsoff
George
Verigin
Nastia
Zbitnoff
Mabel
Makortoff
Fred W.
Wieshlow
Mabel
Verigin
William
Androsoff
Anna
Androsoff
W.E.
Wieshlow
Dunya
Samaroden
Anne
Wieshlow
Mike
Makortoff
John
Samaroden
Fedosia
Verigin
Helen
Pereverzoff
Nicholas P.
Horkoff
Maria
Golooboff
Anastasia
Lords
Mary
Wieshlow
Joseph
Pereverzoff
Pauline
Horkoff
Polly
Shkuratoff
David W.
Horkoff
William
Shkuratoff
Anne
Holoboff
Thomas
Holoboff
Peter W.
Zaytsoff
William S.
Zaytsoff
William
Zaytsoff
Polly
Zaytsoff
Fred
Zaytsoff

Index to Doukhobor Cemeteries

Welcome to the Doukhobor Cemetery Index. This index contains the name and location of 108 Doukhobor cemetery and burial sites in the provinces of Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. It also identifies the status of transcriptions for these cemeteries.
Index – Saskatchewan – Alberta – British Columbia

Saskatchewan

Area Cemetery Legal Land Description GPS Condition Transcription
Arran
Bogomdannoye SE 16-35-30-W1 51°59.896 x
101°41.689
Destroyed Completed
Khlebodarnoye NW 12-34-30-W1 51°54.535 x
101°44.257
Overgrown Completed
Lebedevo SW 21-33-31-W1 51° 50.595 x
101°48.738
Overgrown Completed
Lyubomirnoye SE 2-34-31-W1  51°53.319 x
101°45.020
Overgrown Completed
Lyubomirnoye No. 2 NE 2-34-30-W1 Overgrown Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Mikhailovka NW 36-34-30-W1  51°57.887 x
101° 35.549
Destroyed Completed
Novo-Kamenka Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Pokrovskoye SW 21-34-30-W1  51°55.776 x
101°39.913
Partially
Overgrown
Completed
Semenovka NW 14-34-30-W1  51°55.103 x
101°37.202
Well Maintained Completed
Tikhomirnoye SE 28-33-30-W1 51°51.406 x
101°39.469
Overgrown Completed
Vera See Vosneseniye.
Vosneseniye NW 22-34-30-W1  51°55.971 x
101°38.263
Destroyed Completed
Blaine Lake
Haralowka (Gorelovka) SE35-44-8-W3 52°49.801 x
107°02.682
Well Maintained Completed
Old Haralowka SW35-44-8-W3 52°49.925 x
107°03.868
Destroyed Completed
Old Pozirayevka SE28-44-6-W3 52°48.780 x
106°48.391
Partially Maintained Completed
Old Spasovka NW14-45-5-W3 52°53.039 x
106°37.628
Partially Overgrown Completed
Old Terpeniye SE22-43-7-W3 52°42.855 x
106°47.247
Destroyed Completed
Ospenia (Uspeniye) SE1-44-6-W3 52°45.514 x
106°43.770
Well Maintained Completed
Pazaraevka (Balmoral) NW29-44-6-W3 52°49.637 x
106°50.389
Well Maintained Completed
Petrofka NE25-42-7-W3 52°39.006 x
106°52.093
Well Maintained Completed
Riverhill (Spasovka) RL8-45-5-W3 52°47.482 x
106°40.895
Well Maintained Completed
Slavanka NE17-44-5-W3 52°47.468 x
106°40.863
Well Maintained Completed
Terpeniye (Brook Hill) NE12-43-7-W3 52°41.767 x
106°52.595
Well Maintained Completed
Trinity (Troitskoye) SW2-44-7-W3 52°45.693 x
106°55.410
Well Maintained Completed
Borden Tambovka SE 2-40-9-W3 52°24.456 x
107°11.197
Overgrown Completed
Buchanan
Blagosklonnoye NW 3-30-5-W2 51°34.505 x
102°38.355
Destroyed Completed
Kalmakovo SE 30-30-5-W2 51°37.718 x
102°41.875
Overgrown Completed
Kirilovka NW 7-32-6-W2 51°43.997 x
102°51.307
Overgrown Completed
Moiseyevo
(Khristianovka)
SE 21-31-6-W2 51°40.021 x
102°47.661
Partially Maintained Completed
Novo-Goreloye SW 9-32-6-W2 51°43.621 x
102°48.476
Partially Destroyed Completed
Novo-Troitskoye NE 23-31-6-W2 51°40.580 x
102°44.963
Overgrown Completed
Old Goreloye NE 17-30-5-W2  51°36.277 x
102°40.357
Destroyed Completed
Ooteshenia (Utesheniye) SW 31-30-5-W2 51°38.468 x
102°42.505
Well Maintained Completed
Canora Besednoye NE 17-31-3-W2 51°23.485. x
102°23.776
Restored Completed
Blagoveshcheniye SW 19-31-2-W2 51°40.139 x
102°17.276
Destroyed Completed
Meadowdale NW 34-31-3-W2 51°45.088 x
102°20.983
Partially Maintained Completed
Novoye NE 14-31-3-W2 51°39.456 x
102°19.180
Overgrown Completed
Hyas Vozvysheniye SW 6-34-2-W2 51°52.934 x
102°17.197
Destroyed Completed
Kamsack
Alexeyevka NW 21-28-32-W1 Overgrown Completed
Efremovka NW 6-29-32-W1 51°29.358 x 101°59.251 Overgrown Completed
Lyubovnoye SE 13-29-33-W1  51°30.938 x 102°00.035 Destroyed Completed
Old Efremovka SW 20-29-32-W1 51°31.613 x
101°557.882
Destroyed Completed
Petrovka NW 22-28-32-W1 51°26.367 x
101°54.770
Partially Maintained Completed
Truzhdeniye SE 5-29-32-W1  51°28,854 x
101°57.062
Overgrown Completed
Voskreseniye SW 12-29-32-W1 51°29.541 x
101°52.117
Overgrown Completed
Kylemore God’s Blessing SE9-34-12-W2 51°54.172 x
103° 38.777
Well Maintained Completed
Langham Bogdanovka (Cee Pee) NW 20-39-8-W3 52°22.325 x
107°07.745
Well Maintained Completed
Pakrowka
(Henrietta)
SE5-39-9-W3 52°19.486 x
107°15.108
Well Maintained Completed
Kirilowka NW14-39-8-W3 52°21.604 x
107°03.571
Well Maintained Completed
 

Mikado

Chursinoff SE 21-32-2-W2  51°45.088 x
102°13.185 
Well Maintained Completed
Rodionovka SE 9-30-2-W2  51°34.896 x
102°13.178
Overgrown Completed
Sovetnoye NE 35-30-2-W2  51°38.698 x
102°10.738
Overgrown Completed
Pelly
Arkhangel’skoye NW 16-35-31-W1 52°00.564 x
101°50.149
Overgrown Completed
Gromovoye SE 32-34-31-W1 51°57.643 x
101°48.946
Destroyed Completed
Osvobozhdeniye SW 7-34-31-W1  51°53.740 x
101°50.972
Overgrown Completed
Pavlovo Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Peaceful Cove SE 25-33-31-W1  51°51.144 x
101°51.691
Well Maintained Completed
Perekhodnoye SW 8-35-31-W1  51°59.156 x
101°52.065
Destroyed Completed
Runnymede
Tambovka NW 2-29-31-W1 51°29.186 x
101°45.566
Well Maintained Completed
Trudolyubovoye SW 10-29-31-W1  51°29.837 x
101°46.373
Partially Maintained Completed
Vossianiye NE 21-28-31-W1  51°26.519 x
101°47.040
Overgrown Completed
Sheho Blagodatnoye NW 3-30-9-W2 51°34.319 x
103°12.222
Overgrown Completed
Togo
Nikolayevka SW3-28-31-W1 51°23.594 x
101°46.952
Destroyed Completed
(Old) Kamenka SE 21-27-31-W1 51°21.027 x
101°47.367
Destroyed Completed
(Old) Terpeniye NE 11-27-32-W1 51°19.624 x
101°52.853
Overgrown Completed
Veregin Blagodarnoe NE 19-29-1-W2  51°32.061 x
102°05.168
Overgrown Completed
CCUB SW 35-29-1-W2  51°33.108 x
102°02.996 
Overgrown Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Kapustino SE 36-31-2-W2 51°41.936 x
102°09.328
Overgrown Completed
Khutor SE 13-30-1-W2 51°35.600 x
102°00.893
Overgrown Completed
Nadezhda
(Nadojda)
NW 24 & NE 23-31-1-W2 51°40.591 x
102°01.805
Well Maintained Completed
Novo-Pokrovka NW 21-30-1-W2  51°37.359 x
102°05.340
Partially Destroyed Completed
Otradnoye NE 27-31-1-W2 51°41.421 x
102°03.488
Overgrown Completed
Prokuratovo NW 35-30-1-W2  51°33.108 x
102°02.996
Destroyed Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Terpeniye NE 35-29-2-W2 51°33.605 x
102°10.292
Destroyed Completed
Tolstoy NW 27-31-1-W2 51°41.543 x
102°03.928
Well Maintained Completed
Slavnoe S1/2 & NE4-32-2-W2 51°43.141 x
102°13.243
Overgrown Adopted
Jonathan
Kalmakoff
Smireniye SW 35-31-1-W2 51°41.884 x
102°02.542
Overgrown Completed
Spasovka NE 25-30-1-W2 51°37.857 x
102°01.019
Overgrown Completed
Ubezhdeniye
(Linden Valley)
NW 6-30-32-W1 51°34.700 x
101° 59.709
Overgrown Completed
Verigino NE 9-30-1-W2  51°35.500 x
102°05.413
Overgrown Completed
Vernoye NW 33-29-1-W2  51°33.531 x
102°05.478
Overgrown Completed
Watson Daphne Doukhobor NW 34-37-18-W2 52°13.447 x
104°30.373
Well Maintained Completed
Whitebeech Troitskoye SE 2-36-30-W1 52°03.413 x
101°38.151
Overgrown Completed
Uspeniye NW 3-36-30-W1  52°03.952 x
101°40.836
Overgrown Completed

Alberta

Area Cemetery Legal Land Description GPS Condition Transcription
Arrowwood Christian Community of Universal Brotherhood SE 30-20-23-W4 50°43.665 x
113°01.733
Well Maintained Completed
Lundbreck United Doukhobors of Alberta NW 24-7-2-W5 49°34.930 x
114°08.880
Well Maintained Completed
Queenstown Krasivaya Dolina NW11-19-22-W4 50°35.850 x
112°57.232
Destroyed Completed

British Columbia

Area Cemetery Legal Land Description GPS Condition Transcription
Castlegar Brilliant Block 6, District Lot 9, Kootenay District, Plan 2938 49°19.215 x 117°38.774 Partially Maintained Completed
Champion Creek (Blagodatnoye) Sub-lot 26, District Lot 4598, Kootenay District Plan X-34 49°13.420 x 117°40.419 Partially Maintained Completed
Ootischenia Lot 70, District Lot 4598, Kootenay District Plan 4882 49°16.647 x 117°38.369 Partially Maintained Completed
Verigin’s Memorial Park Sub-lot 28, Block 10, Kootenay District, Plan 2938 49°19.163 x 117°37.889 Well Maintained Completed
Gilpin Gilpin (No. 1) District Lot 2733, Group 1, Similkameen Division, Yale District Plan 6174A except part known As RW of the VV and E Railway. 49° 00.472 x  118° 19.047 Partially Overgrown Completed
Gilpin (No. 2) District Lot 2733, Group 1, Similkeen Division, Yale District, Plan 6174A 49°00.523 x 118°18.438 Partially Overgrown Completed
Glade Glade
(Plodorodnoye)
Block 85, District Lot 1239, Kootenay District, Plan 2888 49°23.597 x 117°32.182 Overgrown Completed
Grand Forks Bozhiya Dolina Overgrown Adopted
Lawrna Myers
Outlook (Khristovoye) Lot A, District Lot 334, Plan 34009, Similkameen Division 49°02.424 x 118°29.016 Partially Maintained Completed
 Sleepy Hollow (Ubezhishche) Lot F, District Lot 1027, Similkameen Division, Yale District Plan 17794 in the Kettle River Assessment District 49°00.103 x 118°32.433 Overgrown Completed
USCC (Sion) Lot 38, District Lot 453, Similkameen Division, Yale District Plan 8515 & Lot 47, District Lot 453, Similkameen Division, Yale District, Plan 8515  Tgrail Assessment District 49°00.969 x 118°29.831 Partially Maintained Completed
Hillers Hilliers Doukhobor Lot 7, District Lot 92, Newcastle District, Plan 2032 49°17.430 x 124°21.502 Partially Maintained Completed
Hills Hills Doukhobor Block 26, Lot 8127, Kootenay District, Plan 1187, except that part shown outlined in red on reference plan 62485-I 50°06.489 x 117°29.600 Well Maintained Completed
Krestova Krestova Lot 32 of Lot S 7368, 8773, 9326, Kootenay Dist Plan 5487 49°26.123 x 117°35.304 Partially
Overgrown
Completed
Pass Creek Pass Creek (Lugovoye) Lot 18 of District Lots 7245 and 7244, Kootenay District Plan 4784 49°22.975 x 117°40.816 Well Maintained Completed
Perrys Perry Siding (Persikovoye) Lot 11, District Lot 383, Kootenay District Plan 2887 49°39.631 x 117°30.396 Well Maintained Completed
Salmo Salmo Doukhobor Parcel A (see L28214) of Sub-lot 71, District Lot 273, Kootenay District Plan X70 49°13.844 x 117°15.128 Well Maintained Completed
Shoreacres Shoreacres (Prekrasnoye) Nelson Trail Assessment Authority, Lot 56, District Lot 303, Kootenay District Plan 2954 49°26.077 x 117°31.407 Partially Maintained Completed
Slocan Park Slocan Park (Valleyview) Block A, except a strip of land 50 feet and parallel with adjoining both sides of the highway, District Lot 3820, District of Kootenay Plan 5584 in the Nelson Slocan Assessment Authority 49°31.640 x 117°37.966 Well Maintained Completed
Thrums Thrums Doukhobor Parcel A (Reference Plan 55952-I) Block 7, District Lot 1239, Kootenay District, Plan 1525 49°22.119 x 117°34.020 Overgrown Completed
Winlaw Winlaw Doukhobor District Lot 3819, Kootenay District 49°36.078 x 117°34.800 Overgrown Completed
Ymir Porto Rico
Doukhobor
Plan X55, District Lot 1238, Kootenay District 49°19.572 x 117°14.747 Overgrown Completed

Scope of Index

This index contains information about private Doukhobor cemeteries. In addition, there are many public municipal cemeteries in Canada which contain significant numbers of Doukhobor burials. These include the following:

Cemetery Transcriptions

Online transcriptions are available for those cemeteries listed above as “complete”. Transcriptions are currently in progress for those cemeteries listed above as “adopted”. Cemeteries listed above as “adopt me” have not yet been adopted for the purpose of transcription. For information on the project to transcribe all Doukhobor cemeteries and burial sites in Canada, the current status of the project, and how you can volunteer to participate, see the Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project.

Acknowledgements

This index is the result of a project begun over four years ago to locate and document all known Doukhobor cemetery and burial sites in Canada. It would not have been possible without the dedicated field research of the following individuals: Fred S. Petroff in Saskatchewan, Michael Verigin in Alberta and Lawrna Myers in British Columbia.

This index is a work in progress and will continue to be updated. While every effort is made to have information current and accurate, inaccuracies may occur. If you know of any cemetery data in error or not listed, please contact Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project

Welcome to the Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project!  Learn about the project to transcribe all Doukhobor cemeteries and burial sites in Canada, the current status of the project, and how you can volunteer to participate.

What is the Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project?

The Doukhobor Cemetery Project is an ambitious plan to transcribe all Doukhobor cemeteries and burial sites in the provinces of Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia.  The first phase (already completed) involved the survey and establishment of a Canada-wide inventory of Doukhobor cemeteries – the first of its kind to be compiled.  The second phase involves the transcription of burials in each cemetery.  When completed, each cemetery will be posted on the Doukhobor Genealogy Website with information about its location, history, usage, physical layout, driving directions, photographs and, of course, detailed transcriptions of burials.  It will also tell you whom to contact for more information. 

Why is this Project so important?

Cemeteries are a critical source of information as we document our Doukhobor family history.  To date, few Doukhobor cemeteries have been transcribed for the purpose of documenting and preserving the information they contain.  Moreover, these cemeteries are dispersed across Western Canada, often in remote locations, making them difficult to physically access.  The unfortunate result is that most of this valuable cemetery information never makes it into the hands of the researchers who are looking for it – either because they don’t know it exists or, if they do, they don’t know how to locate it.  The purpose of the Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project is to provide greater access to this data by creating a centralized inventory accessible online by researchers all over the world!

When will the Project be completed?

With a project this size, it’s best to break it down into smaller goals.  The first goal is to have all of the 106 cemeteries in Western Canada adopted by a volunteer – by Fall 2005.  The second goal is to have at least 35 cemeteries transcribed each year for three years – by Fall of 2005, 2006 and 2007.  By Fall 2008, transcriptions for all cemeteries will (hopefully) be complete and the information will be accessible online through the Doukhobor Genealogy Website.  It is anticipated that the project will be completed over a three-year period.

What is the current status of the Project?

To date, of the 108 private Doukhobor cemeteries in Western Canada:

  • 101 are complete and available online
  • 7 cemetery transcriptions are in progress
  • no cemeteries require adoption by volunteers for transcription at this time

For a list of specific cemeteries which have been transcribed, see the Doukhobor Cemetery Index.

Where do I sign up?

If you are interested in contributing to this worthwhile project, we’d love to have you!  Our volunteers [15 at present] come from across Western Canada.  You don’t need to live in the area you are transcribing (but it does help!).  Each volunteer receives detailed instructions, data templates and ongoing technical and Russian translation support.  In addition, an electronic mailing list will be established to allow volunteers to compare notes and share best practices.  If you can help, know someone who can, or have any other questions about the Doukhobor Cemetery Transcription Project, please contact the project coordinator: Jonathan Kalmakoff.

Index of Doukhobor Settlements in the 1921 Canada Census

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

The following geographic finding aid may be used to locate Doukhobors in the 1921 Canada Census. Search by province, district, sub-district and page number to find a comprehensive listing of Doukhobor settlements (villages, work camps, homesteads, households, etc.). Then consult the Library and Archives Canada online images and microfilm copies (once available) of the original census to find specific Doukhobor entries. ***Note: This index is a work in progress. It currently contains Doukhobor entries for the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia only; Doukhobor entries for the province of Saskatchewan will be added soon.

Index – Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta –   British Columbia

 

Manitoba

District No. and Name Sub-District No. and Description City, Town, Village, Township Doukhobor Entries Pages Microfilm
26 Brandon 8   Townships 11-12, Range 19, west of Principal Meridian. Independent Doukhobor homesteads. 11. N/A
26 Brandon 13   Townships 9-11, whole or fractional, Range 22, west of Principal Meridian lying south of the Assiniboine River. Independent Doukhobor homestead. 6. N/A
26 Brandon 34 Brandon Brandon City, all that part lying south of the centre line of Victoria Avenue and east of the centre line of Fifth Street. Independent Doukhobor households. 17. N/A
26 Brandon 35 Brandon Brandon City, that portion lying south of the centre line of Victoria Avenue and between the centre line of Fifth and Tenth Streets. Independent Doukhobor households. 11-12, 19, 22, 30. N/A
26 Brandon 37 Brandon Brandon City, that portion lying south of the centre line of Victoria Avenue and west of the centre line of Sixteenth Street, and north of the centre line of Victoria Avenue and west of the centre line of Eighteenth Street. Independent Doukhobor household. 18. N/A
27 Dauphin 2   Townships 24-25, Range 15 west of Principal Meridian within the Municipality of Ste. Rose Independent Doukhobor homestead. 15. N/A
27 Dauphin 19   Townships 27-28, Ranges 28-29, west of Principal Meridian. Independent Doukhobor homesteads. 18, 23. N/A
32 Nelson 7   Townships 33-34, Ranges 24-28, West of Principal Meridian. Independent Doukhobor homesteads. 5-6, 8. N/A
32 Nelson 8   Townships 33-34, Range 29, West of Principal Meridian, including village of Benito. Independent Doukhobor households and homesteads. 3-5, 9-13, 15-16, 18-20, 23. N/A

Saskatchewan

Work-in-progress.

Alberta 

District No. and Name Sub-District No. and Description City, Town, Village, Township Doukhobor Entries Pages Microfilm
1 Battle River 1   Townships 33-35, Range 1 and Township 35, Range 2, West of 4 Meridian. Independent Doukhobor homesteads. 8, 10. N/A
2 Bow River 13   Townships 17-20, Ranges 21-22 lying east of McGregor Lake and the Canal, West of 4 Meridian. Communal Doukhobor settlement. 3. N/A
7 Lethbridge 12   Townships 4-6, Ranges 13-15, West of 4 Meridian, including village of Skiff. Independent Doukhobor homesteads. 6-7. N/A
8 Macleod 4   Townships 3-6, West of 5 Meridian and East of Provincial Boundary. Independent Doukhobor homestead. 9. N/A
8 Macleod 7   Townships 7-8, Ranges 28-29 and Townships 7-9, Range 30, West of 5 Meridian. Independent Doukhobor homestead; Doukhobor labourers. 2, 10. N/A
8 MacLeod 8   Townships 7-9, Range 1, West of 5 Meridian, including Cowley village. Communal Doukhobor settlements. 4-6. N/A
8 MacLeod 9   Townships 7-9, Range 2, West of 5 Meridian, including Lundbreck village. Communal Doukhobor settlements. 5-8. N/A

British Columbia

District No. and Name

Sub-District No. and Description

City, Town, Village, Township

Doukhobor Entries

Pages

Microfilm

18

Kootenay West

6B

Trail

Columbia Gardens

Independent Doukhobor household.

6.

N/A

18

Kootenay West

9

Trail

Birchbank

Doukhobor labourers.

5.

N/A

Blueberry

Independent Doukhobor household.

6.

Kinnaird

Independent Doukhobor household.

7.

18

Kootenay West

10

Trail

Brilliant

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Blagodatnoye, Lugovoye, Utesheniye (Ootischenia).

1-30.

N/A

City of Trail

Communal Doukhobor commercial enterprise.

31.

N/A

18

Kootenay West

10A

Trail

Brilliant

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Brilliant.

1-23.

N/A

Crescent Valley

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Krestova.

24-30.

Glade

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Plodorodnoye.

30-42.

Shoreacres

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Prekrasnoye.

42-44.

Taghum

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Dorogotsennoye.

44.

Quory

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Skalistoye.

44-45.

Koch’s

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Kov.

45-46.

Winlaw

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Veseloye, Kirpichnoye.

47-49.

Perrys

Communal Doukhobor settlement of Persikovoye.

49.

Porto Rico

Communal Doukhobor logging camp.

50.

Rossland

Communal Doukhobor farm.

51-52.

Nelson City

Communal Doukhobor commercial enterprise.

53.

18

Kootenay West

11

Trail

South Slocan

Independent Doukhobor households.

9-10.

N/A

Shoreacres

Independent Doukhobor households.

11-12.

Tarrys

Independent Doukhobor households.

12-13.

Thrums

Independent Doukhobor households.

13-15.

18

Kootenay West

13B

Trail

Shields

Doukhobor labourer.

11.

N/A

18

Kootenay West

21

Nelson City

Nelson City

Independent Doukhobor households.

6-7.

N/A

18

Kootenay West

23

Nelson City

Nelson City

Doukhobor labourer.

11.

N/A

18

Kootenay West

25

Trail City

Trail City

Doukhobor labourers.

3, 14, 18, 23, 32, 33.

N/A

25

Yale

48

Grand Forks

Grand Forks City

Independent Doukhobor households.

2, 29-30.

N/A

25

Yale

49

Grand Forks

Cascade

Independent Doukhobor households.

6-7.

N/A

25

Yale

50

Grand Forks

Deep Creek

Doukhobor labourer.

6.

N/A

25

Yale

51

Grand Forks

Paulson

Doukhobor labourers.

1.

N/A

25

Yale

52

Grand Forks

Carson

Communal Doukhobor settlements of Fruktova, Ubezhishche, Khristovoye.

1-13, 15-25.

N/A

Notes

This finding aid may be used to locate Doukhobor census enumerations both in the original census records and in census transcriptions as they become available. Currently the census is only available through a paid subscription to Ancestry.com. For a description of the 1921 Canada Census, including its historical background, content, usefulness and reliability, availability and published indices, see the Guide to Doukhobor Census Records. If you have any additional information or clarifications with respect to Doukhobor entries in the 1921 Canada Census, please contact Jonathan J. Kalmakoff.

Index of Doukhobor Settlements in the 1916 Census of the Northwest Provinces

by Jonathan J. Kalmakoff

The following geographic finding aid may be used to locate Doukhobors in the 1916 Census of the Northwest Provinces. Search by province, district, sub-district and page number to find a comprehensive listing of Doukhobor settlements (villages, work camps, homesteads, households, etc.). Then consult the Library and Archives Canada microfilm copies or online images of the original census to find specific Doukhobor entries.

Index  – Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta 

 

Manitoba

District  No. and Name Sub-District No. and Description Doukhobor Entries Pages Microfilm
1 Brandon 3 City of Brandon Independent Doukhobor households 17, 20, 24, 25, 30. T-21925
1 Brandon 12 City of Brandon Doukhobor workers 6. T-21925
1 Brandon 13 City of Brandon Doukhobor worker 24. T-21925
5 Marquette 20 Russell RM Doukhobor worker 10. T-21927
7 Nelson 3 Swan River RM Independent Doukhobor homesteads; Doukhobor workers 9, 12, 18, 22. T-21928
7 Nelson 4 Swan River RM Independent Doukhobor homestead; Doukhobor workers 5, 10, 14. T-21928

Saskatchewan

District  No. and Name

Sub-District No. and Description

Doukhobor Entries

Pages

Microfilm

21

Mackenzie

02A

City of Yorkton

Independent Doukhobor households

24.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

02B

City of Yorkton

Independent Doukhobor households

3, 9.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

08

Wallace RM; Sliding Hills RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

Communal Doukhobor farm

1.

19.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

09

Cote RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

8, 11, 15, 18, 19, 20, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28.

T-21938

Vossianiye

17.

Petrovo

21, 22.

21

Mackenzie

10

Cote RM; Town of Kamsack

Town of Kamsack

2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 22, 24.

T-21938

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33.

Efremovka

26, 27.

Lyubovnoye

27.

Voskriseniye

34, 35.

21

Mackenzie

11

Cote RM; St. Phillips RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 4, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20, 21, 22.

T-21938

Trudolyubovoye

2, 3, 4.

Tambovka

9, 10.

21

Mackenzie

12

St. Philips RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 18, 23, 24.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

13

Livingston RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, 19, 20.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

14

Livingston RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 16.

T-21938

“Crazy” village (Khlebodarnoye)

2, 3, 4.

21

Mackenzie

15

Livingston RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15.

T-21938

21

Mackenzie

18

Keys RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15.

T-21938

Nadezhda

16, 17.

Smireniye

17, 18.

Otradnoye

18, 19.

Blagoveshcheniye

20.

Kapustino

21, 22.

21

Mackenzie

19

Sliding Hills RM; Village of Veregin

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14.

T-21938

Blagodarnoye

9, 10.

Lyubovnoye

13.

Village of Veregin

15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20.

21

Mackenzie

20

Sliding Hills RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

1, 10, 21, 22.

T-21938

Rodionovo

5, 6.

Sovetnoye

8, 9.

Terpeniye

18, 19, 20, 21.

21

Mackenzie

21

Sliding Hills RM; Keys RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

13, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25.

T-21940

Novoye

22, 23.

21

Mackenzie

22

Keys RM; Village of Hyas

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

9, 10.

T-21940

21

Mackenzie

24

Good Lake RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16.

T-21940

21

Mackenzie

25

Good Lake RM; Town of Canora

Town of Canora

2, 3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17.

T-21940

Independent Doukhobor homestead

24.

21

Mackenzie

28

Insinger RM

Communal Doukhobor farm

20.

T-21940

21

Mackenzie

29

Buchanan RM; Village of Buchanan

Village of Buchanan

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.

T-21940

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19.

21

Mackenzie

30

Invermay RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads.

27, 30.

T-21940

24

North Battleford

01

Great Bend RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

20, 21, 25.

T-21941

24

North Battleford

03

Mayfield RM

Doukhobor worker

10.

T-21941

24

North Battleford

04

North Battleford RM

Saskatchewan Provincial Asylum

13, 14, 15, 16, 20, 23.

T-21941

24

North Battleford

07

Redberry RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

12, 13, 14, 15.

T-21941

24

North Battleford

09

Blaine Lake RM; Town of Blaine Lake

Town of Blaine Lake

1, 2, 4, 5.

T-21941

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 32, 33.

Petrovka 30, 31.

24

North Battleford

10

Blaine Lake RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

28, 29, 30, 31, 32.

T-21941

29

Saskatoon

11

Eagle Creek RM

Doukhobor worker

16.

T-21944

29

Saskatoon

12

Park RM

Independent Doukhobor homesteads

2, 3, 4, 13, 19, 24, 27.

T-21944

Pokrovka

19, 20, 21.

Kirilovka

22, 23, 24.

Bogdanovka

25, 26.

29

Saskatoon

14

Park RM; Town of Langham

Doukhobor worker

5.

T-21945

Town of Langham

21.

Alberta

District  No. and Name Sub-District No. and Description Doukhobor Entries Pages Microfilm
32 Battle River 1 Township 35, Range 4, West of 4 Independent Doukhobor homestead 33. T-21946
32 Battle River 9 Village of Provost Doukhobor workers 9. T-21947
38 Lethbridge 11 Town of Raymond Doukhobor work party 15, 18. T-21951
38 Lethbridge 13 Village of Warner Doukhobor work party 8, 10, 11. T-21951
38 Lethbridge 20f City of Lethbridge Doukhobor worker 31. T-21952
39 Macleod 7 Village of Lundbreck Communal Doukhobor settlement 14. T-21952
39 Macleod 8 Village of Cowley Communal Doukhobor settlement 5, 7, 14. T-21952
40 Medicine Hat 19 Village of Bow Island  Doukhobor work party 11-12. T-21953

Notes

This finding aid may be used to locate Doukhobor census enumerations both in the original census records and in census transcriptions such as those provided online by Ancestry.com. For a description of the 1916 Census of the Northwest Provinces, including its historical background, content, usefulness and reliability, availability and published indices, see the Guide to Doukhobor Census Records.

This article was reproduced by permission in the Bulletin Vol. 40 No. 4 (Regina: Saskatchewan Genealogical Society, December 2009).